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The Dulwich Horror and Others

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Inspired by the Cthulhu Mythos of H. P. Lovecraft, this stylish new collection of adventure stories fizzes with wit and invention. They can be enjoyed separately, but read them in one sitting and the pieces fit horribly together into a larger and more terrible nightmare. † These tales constitute David Hambling’s initial foray into the realm of Lovecraftian fiction. The fert Inspired by the Cthulhu Mythos of H. P. Lovecraft, this stylish new collection of adventure stories fizzes with wit and invention. They can be enjoyed separately, but read them in one sitting and the pieces fit horribly together into a larger and more terrible nightmare. † These tales constitute David Hambling’s initial foray into the realm of Lovecraftian fiction. The fertility of imagination, the crisp character delineations, and the smooth-flowing prose that we find in these seven tales leave us wishing for more of the same, and Hambling will no doubt oblige in the coming years. For now, we can sit back and relish a brace of stories that not only evoke the shade of the dreamer from Providence, but which that dreamer himself would have enjoyed to the full. —S. T. Joshi (from his foreword)


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Inspired by the Cthulhu Mythos of H. P. Lovecraft, this stylish new collection of adventure stories fizzes with wit and invention. They can be enjoyed separately, but read them in one sitting and the pieces fit horribly together into a larger and more terrible nightmare. † These tales constitute David Hambling’s initial foray into the realm of Lovecraftian fiction. The fert Inspired by the Cthulhu Mythos of H. P. Lovecraft, this stylish new collection of adventure stories fizzes with wit and invention. They can be enjoyed separately, but read them in one sitting and the pieces fit horribly together into a larger and more terrible nightmare. † These tales constitute David Hambling’s initial foray into the realm of Lovecraftian fiction. The fertility of imagination, the crisp character delineations, and the smooth-flowing prose that we find in these seven tales leave us wishing for more of the same, and Hambling will no doubt oblige in the coming years. For now, we can sit back and relish a brace of stories that not only evoke the shade of the dreamer from Providence, but which that dreamer himself would have enjoyed to the full. —S. T. Joshi (from his foreword)

58 review for The Dulwich Horror and Others

  1. 5 out of 5

    C.T. Phipps

    David Hambling is one of the great new voices in Neo-Lovecraft fiction like David J. West and Matthew Davenport. He may be the best, however, due to the fact he is capable of creating stories which genuinely terrify with alien horrors while maintaining the spark of humanity which renders his characters relatable. In this collection of short stories and novellas, he has a wonderful group of obsessive humans poking the Cthulhu Mythos with a stick. In "The Dulwich Horror", we have an homage to the David Hambling is one of the great new voices in Neo-Lovecraft fiction like David J. West and Matthew Davenport. He may be the best, however, due to the fact he is capable of creating stories which genuinely terrify with alien horrors while maintaining the spark of humanity which renders his characters relatable. In this collection of short stories and novellas, he has a wonderful group of obsessive humans poking the Cthulhu Mythos with a stick. In "The Dulwich Horror", we have an homage to the Dunwich Horror taken from the perspective of a bunch of english radicals. However, its sequel is even better as a man coping with the guilt of his disfigured wife goes to criminal and eventually homicidal lengths to cure her. The interweaving of stories in the volume is also masterfully done, making you sense this is all part of a larger tapestry. Each story is more interesting than the last and illustrates just how good David is at mixing horror, science, and human motives. To give a sense of how the stories go, I think the best example is the third story in the volume which is a Pulp Detective story set during America's Prohibition. A man is hired to investigate a German doctor who has invented a filter which allows him to create high grade alcohol in an era of bathtub gin. It gradually becomes clear the man is insane, there are horrifying things living nearby, and the poor detective is getting a lot more than he's bargained for by taking on the case. This is an odd one out for being in America but is otherwise representative of the book's style. Even the introductions are great with S.T. Joshi giving a nice foreword talking about David Hambling's skills as well as a discussion about how while Lovecraft thought 200 years was a long time (it's not), that Europe's own history is much more suited to discussing antediluvian subjects like evolution as well as abominable ancient pagan rites. As the old saying goes, "In America, a 100 years is a long time and in England a 100 miles is a long distance." If you buy one Lovecraft pastiche, you wouldn't be making a mistake to do this one. They're spooky and spell-binding with never a sense this isn't either the Mythos or the real world. Plus, plenty of local Mythos color. 9/10

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Alarmingly, a pun made by at least two other writers. I can't speak for their work, but this collection makes a good fist of weaving Lovecraft's horrors around the streets, railways and strange old woods of south-east London. Sure, there are times where it runs a bit modern Mythos, characters talking a little too knowledgeably about the structure of the pantheon and the attributes of its entities when more oblique hints would feel more chilling. But simply through walking the same territory as t Alarmingly, a pun made by at least two other writers. I can't speak for their work, but this collection makes a good fist of weaving Lovecraft's horrors around the streets, railways and strange old woods of south-east London. Sure, there are times where it runs a bit modern Mythos, characters talking a little too knowledgeably about the structure of the pantheon and the attributes of its entities when more oblique hints would feel more chilling. But simply through walking the same territory as these tales, I'm more inclined to forgive this than might otherwise be the case.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kris Lugosi

    "Never summon that which you can not put down...." Shadows from Norwood, is a collection of seven stories told in the Lovecraftian style. All stories are told with a strong Lovecraft voice with an original embellishment on most of the tales. David Hambling incorporates many of the classic Lovecraft themes, with a heavy emphasize on not losing the scientific side of his storytelling. The Cthulhu mythos that Hambling draws from is exquisite in its delivery and is a perfect homage to Lovecraft. H.P. "Never summon that which you can not put down...." Shadows from Norwood, is a collection of seven stories told in the Lovecraftian style. All stories are told with a strong Lovecraft voice with an original embellishment on most of the tales. David Hambling incorporates many of the classic Lovecraft themes, with a heavy emphasize on not losing the scientific side of his storytelling. The Cthulhu mythos that Hambling draws from is exquisite in its delivery and is a perfect homage to Lovecraft. H.P. would be very proud to know that there are people like Hambling building off his worlds and creating something for future generations to enjoy, forever keeping Lovecraft's stories alive. I could not put this book down. THE DULWICH HORROR OF 1927: A group of arrogant, know it all, grad students stumble upon an ancient evil that will tear them apart quite literally. We have Tom, the keen eyed photographer, George, the leader of the group, Jessica the athletic one of the group, the pleasant know it all Sophie, Daisy, the quiet beautiful one, Daniel, the incredible mathematician, and finally our main character William through which this tale is told. This story reminded me a lot of the movie Flatliners where a group of young doctors experiment with bringing people to the verge of death and reviving them back. For this group of scholars, it is the Whatley house that holds the answers to their questions and fate. There is speculation about what has gone on in that house, from incest to cult satanic worship, but what our characters discover is much more sinister and otherworldly and by awakening the creature they inadvertently cast a shadow of insanity of all those that survive. FIVE STARS TWO FINGERS: When a wealthy Yacht builder's wife suffers an accident that leaves here hand disfigured, he takes it upon himself to find any means necessary to fix her hand and life her spirits even at the cost of others. The Effra House is key to his salvation and with the help of Sir Harold, a transplant should be easily attained....I liked this story. I was a bit annoyed that Michael goes through all this trouble over two fingers (and not even the thumb!!). It's all done out of vanity for his stupid wife who apparently just becomes this catatonic depressed woman because of her disfigurement. Other than that, the story is really good. FOUR STARS THE THING IN THE VAULT: Written and stylized like an old 1920's crime noire mystery, the story opens up with Detective Jones being hired by the wealthy Spencer Wade who needs Jones to check on his investment. Being set in the 20's when prohibition was around, the investment is that of a filter used to supposedly make the best liquor to ever touch one's lips. Wade believes the invention to be too good to be true and sets Jones off to investigate the validity of the inventor's creation. Dr. K is the good doctor that invites not only Jones to his home but other potential investors as well. They all meet up at Dr. K's where takes him into his underground lab. This lab is home to far more than just inventions and paper work and the investors soon find themselves in a battle to save their lives when they meet Dr. K's associates.....Great story from start to finish. FIVE STARS THE MONSTERS IN THE PARK: This was my favorite story (although it was hard to choose). Set in 1936, William is called upon by an old friend to help him with his son, Paul. William is a school teacher and having experiences with all sorts of children, Webster feels he may be able to return his son Paul, back to his usually boisterous self. When William meets with Paul, it is obvious that something is off with the boy. After several conversations with him, William finds out that Paul is no longer Webster's son. Through a form of mind transference, an alien race has traded places with Paul's brain. Paul is just a young boy, and his mind is not up to the task of grasping the concepts that the alien that is living in his body needs to accomplish his mission (whether or not they are sinister is only speculated). The alien wants to go home and to humor him, William and Webster arrange for the "boy" to visit the local radio station. Here Paul constructs a complicated structure that will be able to submit the proper signals to his "people" and Paul will be returned to his body. What that signal picks up, however, is far from home sweet home.... FIVE STARS! THE DEVIL'S IN THE DEEP BLUE SEA: "Being an account of events on the voyage of the SS Amaryllis from Melbourne to Fiji in the Tasman Sea, 1886, as told to William Blake." This was the least of my favorite tales but it was still a good one. Basically a crew of seaman or sent out to find what happened to the Ly-ee-Moon that has been reported missing. They find the remnants of the ship along with two "crazed" crew members that they bring back aboard with them. What they don't know is that one of the crazies has brought a curse aboard with them and they must find a way to break it before they all die at sea. THREE STARS THE NORWOOD BUILDER: So when an eccentric ex asks you to come out in to the middle of nowhere so he can show his "experiments" that he won't tell you about over the phone....don't go. Unfortunately Lottie, even though he husband tried to convince her it was a sketchy idea, still takes the bait, but it's not her that gets gobbled up by the fish on the line. What's supposed to be a harmless visit with an ex-lover and fellow scientist turns into a human experiment with terrible consequences. The basis of this story is really good, but the ending was kinda cheesy. I liked the "mind of matter" mentality and explanation of epigenetics. FOUR STARS SHADOWS OF THE WITCHHOUSE: This is where we come full circle in the Shadows of Norwood tales! Our players from the first story, THE DULWICH HORROR OF 1927, shed more light on the events and fates of the rest of the gang. In a letter addressed to William, Sophia clarifies her role in what happened and what has become of her. Her letter is written from within the walls of Canterbury House Sanatorium and told in three parts. This was my favorite wrap around story I have read in a while and what Sophia reveals is quite astonishing. FIVE STARS This truly felt like reading Lovecraft himself without the sometimes obnoxious attention to detail. Though that is not to discredit the detail that Hambling brings to his stories, from his descriptions of the fish-men, and the ominous shadows that play off the waves and the human eye, all is perfectly detailed and explained. I love the time periods that the author chose to tell his stories in and made them all the richer in my imagination. Each story has its own explanation for how and why these creatures came to our plane of existence and even more interesting are the ways in which the characters combat the "evil." David Hambling is an old soul with a thick Lovecraft style of art.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Lawrenson

    This is a collection of seven stories, some of which are interlinked, exploring different ideas and concepts from the Cthulhu Mythos. The tales are mainly set in or linked to the area of Norwood in London, and when the stories are set in the 20s and 30s, the writing style manages to portray the mood of the era effectively. I’ve read many mythos-related short stories over the years, and these are among the best of them. They evoke a lovecraftian spirit, but are more than just derivative pastiches, This is a collection of seven stories, some of which are interlinked, exploring different ideas and concepts from the Cthulhu Mythos. The tales are mainly set in or linked to the area of Norwood in London, and when the stories are set in the 20s and 30s, the writing style manages to portray the mood of the era effectively. I’ve read many mythos-related short stories over the years, and these are among the best of them. They evoke a lovecraftian spirit, but are more than just derivative pastiches, and never feel clichéd. Hambling manages to blend just enough scientific background into the horror to lend an air of plausibility to the stories, without feeling forced. Highly recommended.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    In "The Dulwich Horror and Others", Hambling has avoided the problems so many HP Lovecraft pastiche writers do and that accordingly make their works tedious reads. With a crisp, clear, but non-derivative voice, Hambling has done a magnificent job with taking HPL's ideas and working them into new situations and new locales. Simply put, if you as a reader enjoy the worlds that HPL devised, you owe it to yourself to read "The Dulwich Horror and Others". In "The Dulwich Horror and Others", Hambling has avoided the problems so many HP Lovecraft pastiche writers do and that accordingly make their works tedious reads. With a crisp, clear, but non-derivative voice, Hambling has done a magnificent job with taking HPL's ideas and working them into new situations and new locales. Simply put, if you as a reader enjoy the worlds that HPL devised, you owe it to yourself to read "The Dulwich Horror and Others".

  6. 5 out of 5

    Myles

    A short story in The Book of Yig turned me into a Hambling fan and The Dulwich Horror & Others did not disappoint. A series of short stories that connect in a way you'll never see coming that any mythos fan will enjoy. A short story in The Book of Yig turned me into a Hambling fan and The Dulwich Horror & Others did not disappoint. A series of short stories that connect in a way you'll never see coming that any mythos fan will enjoy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Philip Hemplow

    TDH&O is the 3rd of David Hambling's books that I've read, and the 3rd that I've thoroughly enjoyed. If you're at all a fan of Lovecraftian fiction and you haven't tried him yet, you've been depriving yourself - and this collection of short stories might be the ideal place to start putting that right. STJ's foreword (which you can peek at via the 'look inside' thing above) probably does a better job than I can of placing this book in the context of the genre, so maybe have a look at that. The col TDH&O is the 3rd of David Hambling's books that I've read, and the 3rd that I've thoroughly enjoyed. If you're at all a fan of Lovecraftian fiction and you haven't tried him yet, you've been depriving yourself - and this collection of short stories might be the ideal place to start putting that right. STJ's foreword (which you can peek at via the 'look inside' thing above) probably does a better job than I can of placing this book in the context of the genre, so maybe have a look at that. The collection comprises seven stories, some of which are linked in ways both subtle and forthright, and some of which stand alone, and which between them they revisit a variety of Mythos tropes and ideas, but always with an intriguing new idea in-and-amongst. I don't want to say too much and risk spoiling any of them for you, but, suffice to say, there's plenty going on here to interest even the most jaded Lovecraftian. (One thing I would recommend is that you read the stories in the order they're presented, for best effect. Like I mentioned, some of them are inter-linked.) A majority of them are set in the environs of South London (where the author has, by now, definitively planted his flag), with others taking us to the South Seas and the backwoods of Vermont. Even for those of us who have read reams of Lovecraftian fiction, the plots are satisfyingly twisty and unpredictable. My personal favourites were Two Fingers and Shadows Of The Witch House, but only by the slenderest of margins. The writing is of a consistently high quality: evocative but unpretentious, free of cliche, with natural-sounding dialogue and imaginative, carefully-crafted descriptions of people, places, and events. It is also chock-full of incidental detail and interesting historical tidbits, that betray the depth of research that has evidently gone into each story. There are moments of subtle humour here, too, though it is used sensibly and at no point compromises the prevailing atmosphere of creeping unease. I actually own both the hardback and the ebook (I was on the move, and didn't want to wait until I got home to finish the book) and can confirm that both are produced to the highest quality. The hardback is particularly nice. (The actual hard cover, beneath the dust jacket, is the full, wraparound cover illustration without the text, and would make a fantastic desktop background!) The editing, formatting, and presentation are all of a suitably professional standard, so have no concerns on that score. There's a lot of commercial pressure on writers these days to spew out huge numbers of books as quickly as possible, which makes it frankly a relief to read things that have instead been produced with care, craft, and a critical eye. This book definitely falls into that category, and if you pick it up you'll reap the benefits of the author's pride in his work. It deserves to do very well, and I hope that it will.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cthulhuwho1

    David Hambling's seven very Lovecraftian tales, in his Shadows from Norwood collection, mostly set in very appropriate, and perfectly Lovecraftian locations in England (such as Dulwich), are grand continuations to H. P. Lovecraft's original stories; and they do include Cthulhu Mythos elements that are beautifully handled. I don't really want to give away the plots for each story, as the realization of their connections to Lovecraft's tales are just part of the fun. Even the names of certain charac David Hambling's seven very Lovecraftian tales, in his Shadows from Norwood collection, mostly set in very appropriate, and perfectly Lovecraftian locations in England (such as Dulwich), are grand continuations to H. P. Lovecraft's original stories; and they do include Cthulhu Mythos elements that are beautifully handled. I don't really want to give away the plots for each story, as the realization of their connections to Lovecraft's tales are just part of the fun. Even the names of certain characters are sometimes veiled references that will add to your literary enjoyment of this book. The most important detail though, is that each of the stories eventually, when read in order, build to a conclusion that is greater than the sum of the parts. The New Corrected Edition of Shadows from Norwood, which fixes a few minor typos, is coming soon from Amazon; and is well worth picking up in any digital or hardcopy format. Two Tentacles Way Up from an Old One in California!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tyson Fultz

    Very good collection of short stories set in Norwood England in the 1920s (save for a couple set in modern times and Chicago) All are written by the author, David Hambling, who borrows Lovecraft themes and archetype stories/monsters which makes it feel familiar but also adds enough twists in the stories to keep them interesting. I would not be surprised if the author is a player of the Call of Cthulhu roleplaying game since a lot of the stories and characters seem to unfold like a CoC scenario wou Very good collection of short stories set in Norwood England in the 1920s (save for a couple set in modern times and Chicago) All are written by the author, David Hambling, who borrows Lovecraft themes and archetype stories/monsters which makes it feel familiar but also adds enough twists in the stories to keep them interesting. I would not be surprised if the author is a player of the Call of Cthulhu roleplaying game since a lot of the stories and characters seem to unfold like a CoC scenario would. One of the better Cthulhu Mythos compilations I have read this year. Looking forward to the next installment which will hopefully be out in 2014

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Davenport

    David has the amazing ability of voice, and you can see that in this volume of his lovecraftian stories. As with original Lovecraft stories, I was drawn into the stories of David's collection and held rapt the entire time. Especially by "The Dulwich Horror of 1927." I'd also like to emphasize the amazing detail in these stories. Mr. Hambling can tell a detailed scene that pulls you into the story just as much as the plot or dialogue. Definitely, pick up a copy of Shadows From Norwood. David has the amazing ability of voice, and you can see that in this volume of his lovecraftian stories. As with original Lovecraft stories, I was drawn into the stories of David's collection and held rapt the entire time. Especially by "The Dulwich Horror of 1927." I'd also like to emphasize the amazing detail in these stories. Mr. Hambling can tell a detailed scene that pulls you into the story just as much as the plot or dialogue. Definitely, pick up a copy of Shadows From Norwood.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Susie Spizzirro

    Sorry for the delay. Life has dealt me a few misfortunes this last year, almost more than I could handle. Mr.Hambling has a special gift for descriptive scenes. I enjoy all the stories. My favorite was number 7. I highly recommend, Shadows from Norwood to all my Goodreads friends. I thank you for sharing your book with me. Ms. Susie

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mr. D.

    Quite the nice bunch of tales. It succeds in the tricky business of writing lovecraftian pastiches without sounding too much indebted to the original article. Yet it's more along the lines of a Call of Cthulhu campaing than the existential dread of Barron's best effort or Ligotti's desolation. Most of the stories read extremely well and fast and Hambling, the good journalist he is, doesn't indulge in the purple prose so common for the genre, which is good; he unfortunately starts dropping names Quite the nice bunch of tales. It succeds in the tricky business of writing lovecraftian pastiches without sounding too much indebted to the original article. Yet it's more along the lines of a Call of Cthulhu campaing than the existential dread of Barron's best effort or Ligotti's desolation. Most of the stories read extremely well and fast and Hambling, the good journalist he is, doesn't indulge in the purple prose so common for the genre, which is good; he unfortunately starts dropping names and clear references later in the book that really let the mood down, by means of a falling, crashing fourth wall. Also the final revelation comes out as a deus ex, tough maybe a necessary, unifying one; still the book is enjoyable and very well written, Hambling's voice is clear and his take on the mythos worth reading; one could do worse than choosing this book over say, "Southern Gods" or "The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft".

  13. 5 out of 5

    tom gray

    Truly a cut above the usual Lovecraft pastiche. Truly a cut above the usual Lovecraft pastiche. (And f**k Amazon for forcing one to be unnecessarily verbose and leave 20-word reviews!)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rob Preddy

    Really loved this collection of stories. the Lovecraft elements were well written although the racial parts felt a bit contrived. However the 'thread' that links all the stories was well done and I liked the 'historical' aspects of London especially the Effra bits. Really loved this collection of stories. the Lovecraft elements were well written although the racial parts felt a bit contrived. However the 'thread' that links all the stories was well done and I liked the 'historical' aspects of London especially the Effra bits.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steve Lee

    I thoroughly enjoyed these short stories. Very much in the vein of HPL, a worthy addition to the Cthulhu Mythos.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jack Turner

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Hambling

  18. 5 out of 5

    Raven

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Henderson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Higgs

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tom Landels

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Duncan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andy Gillaspy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Smith

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tobias Cooper

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Fernie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jim Clark

  31. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

  32. 5 out of 5

    Carlyle Clark

  33. 4 out of 5

    Tom Brown

  34. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  35. 4 out of 5

    Richard Tyler

  36. 4 out of 5

    Kim Friant

  37. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  38. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Yanney

  39. 5 out of 5

    Joyce Yanney

  40. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin Inman

  41. 4 out of 5

    Carol Ann

  42. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Lavender

  43. 5 out of 5

    Laura Dobb

  44. 5 out of 5

    Linda Todd

  45. 4 out of 5

    David Holland

  46. 5 out of 5

    Haven Gordon

  47. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  48. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Manning

  49. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  50. 4 out of 5

    Kim Coomey

  51. 5 out of 5

    Michelle & Tony

  52. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  53. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Gates

  54. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  55. 5 out of 5

    Callie

  56. 5 out of 5

    Richard Hicks

  57. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ahmed

  58. 4 out of 5

    Sally

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