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Emotional Rescue: How to Work with Your Emotions to Transform Hurt and Confusion into Energy That Empowers You

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In this life-changing book, acclaimed Buddhist teacher Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche shows how to free yourself from being a victim of your emotions by gaining the awareness and understanding that will help you harness their power.       Emotions bring color and meaning to our lives, but they can also put us on an exhausting rollercoaster ride that takes us to blissful peak stat In this life-changing book, acclaimed Buddhist teacher Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche shows how to free yourself from being a victim of your emotions by gaining the awareness and understanding that will help you harness their power.       Emotions bring color and meaning to our lives, but they can also put us on an exhausting rollercoaster ride that takes us to blissful peak states, the depths of delusion and despair, and everything in between. It is only by learning to relate to our emotions skillfully that we benefit from their richness and glean wisdom, rather than letting them control us. Emotions get their power from a simple but deep-seated source: our lack of self-knowledge. When we bring awareness to our experience of emotions, something truly amazing happens—they lose their power to make us miserable.      In this book, Rinpoche leads us through the three steps of his Emotional Rescue Plan. Mindful Gap is the practice of creating a safe distance between you and your emotions, which gives you the psychological space to work with their energy. Clear Seeing involves recognizing the bigger picture. Last, Letting Go is the practice of releasing stressful physical and emotional energy through exercise, relaxation, and awareness. With each step, we become increasingly familiar with the inner workings of our emotions, seeing straight to the heart of anger, fear, passion, jealousy, and pride. With time and practice, instead of leading us astray, our emotions become our guide towards living a more compassionate, creative, and fulfilling life.


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In this life-changing book, acclaimed Buddhist teacher Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche shows how to free yourself from being a victim of your emotions by gaining the awareness and understanding that will help you harness their power.       Emotions bring color and meaning to our lives, but they can also put us on an exhausting rollercoaster ride that takes us to blissful peak stat In this life-changing book, acclaimed Buddhist teacher Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche shows how to free yourself from being a victim of your emotions by gaining the awareness and understanding that will help you harness their power.       Emotions bring color and meaning to our lives, but they can also put us on an exhausting rollercoaster ride that takes us to blissful peak states, the depths of delusion and despair, and everything in between. It is only by learning to relate to our emotions skillfully that we benefit from their richness and glean wisdom, rather than letting them control us. Emotions get their power from a simple but deep-seated source: our lack of self-knowledge. When we bring awareness to our experience of emotions, something truly amazing happens—they lose their power to make us miserable.      In this book, Rinpoche leads us through the three steps of his Emotional Rescue Plan. Mindful Gap is the practice of creating a safe distance between you and your emotions, which gives you the psychological space to work with their energy. Clear Seeing involves recognizing the bigger picture. Last, Letting Go is the practice of releasing stressful physical and emotional energy through exercise, relaxation, and awareness. With each step, we become increasingly familiar with the inner workings of our emotions, seeing straight to the heart of anger, fear, passion, jealousy, and pride. With time and practice, instead of leading us astray, our emotions become our guide towards living a more compassionate, creative, and fulfilling life.

30 review for Emotional Rescue: How to Work with Your Emotions to Transform Hurt and Confusion into Energy That Empowers You

  1. 4 out of 5

    Meg - A Bookish Affair

    4.5 stars. "Emotional Rescue" is a self-help book that shows how to take negative energy and turn it into something positive. I was intrigued by this book because one of my resolutions for 2016 was to meditate on a more regular basis. I have been doing pretty well but thought this book may help me out a little bit and it definitely did! This book is going to make a great tool for me and I know I will go back to it again and again. What I like about this book is that it has a lot of lessons but i 4.5 stars. "Emotional Rescue" is a self-help book that shows how to take negative energy and turn it into something positive. I was intrigued by this book because one of my resolutions for 2016 was to meditate on a more regular basis. I have been doing pretty well but thought this book may help me out a little bit and it definitely did! This book is going to make a great tool for me and I know I will go back to it again and again. What I like about this book is that it has a lot of lessons but it also has some exercises in order to reinforce the lessons. I like the way the author has the book laid out - lessons are simple and meaningful. While I read this book as a whole, I could see this book working really well reading a chapter at a time. This isn't a book that you need to (or will want to) go through quickly! Mindfulness is powerful! If you have ever thought about trying to be more mindful or meditation, this book has a nice introduction!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alvin

    A contemporary take on Buddhist ideas of mindfulness and emotions. I appreciated how the author tied in modern references to help explain the teachings. The ideas are also presented in such a way that are accessible for those who are resistant to religious teachings. The work one needs to do, as outlined in this book, is hard but necessary. This is not a quick fix.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kitap

    Some readers are put off by the "self-help" tone of this book, but I think that might be its secret genius. It replaces the jargon of Himalayan Buddhism with non-exotic words, concepts, and tone that your average USAmerican sentient being (including the agnostic Buddhist Christian that is yours truly) might find helpful in reducing their suffering and that of others. Here's what I mean. In this book DPR gives a more or less traditional presentation of the Tibetan "three yana" view of Buddhism, b Some readers are put off by the "self-help" tone of this book, but I think that might be its secret genius. It replaces the jargon of Himalayan Buddhism with non-exotic words, concepts, and tone that your average USAmerican sentient being (including the agnostic Buddhist Christian that is yours truly) might find helpful in reducing their suffering and that of others. Here's what I mean. In this book DPR gives a more or less traditional presentation of the Tibetan "three yana" view of Buddhism, but he maps these traditional "vehicles" onto the Emotional Rescue plan's series of three self-help steps. So Hinayana becomes "Mindful Gap," where the emphasis is on the individual "retreating" from an overwhelming emotion into her breath and the present sensations; Mahayana becomes "Clear Seeing" with its emphasis on śūnyatā: the emptiness, openness, and workability of all emotional experience; and Vajrayana becomes "Letting Go," which "refills" that emptiness with ever-present Buddha Nature and its infinite reserves of plenitude and creativity which are available whenever you simply relax. (Remembering here that simple doesn't mean easy. The Tibetans have entire paths constructed to get you to where you already are. Humans are weird.) But DPR doesn't use the word "yana." He doesn't use the word "śūnyatā." He doesn't use the word "buddhavacana," either, although this book (to me at least) was a solid example of that concept, "the Buddha's words," particularly as it is interpreted by the Vajrayana: anything that helps sentient beings find liberation. And it made several points that opened my eyes in ways that previous dharma books have not, so it has helped me and my relationships with others. It also provides exercises to put the Emotional Rescue plan into practice, five or ten minutes at a time. As anyone who has studied Buddhism (or any real life skill, for that matter) knows, it is one thing to read about something and quite another to experience it. Those exercises put this book on my "want to read again" shelf, because I want to give each exercise the attention it deserves and incorporate some of them into my own daily practices. If someone needs the tone of a self-help book for them to discover their lack of an intrinsic ego and their interrelatedness with all other beings, so be it. What should we expect from a dharma book with a title taken from a Rolling Stones song? (Seriously. Rinpoche-la is a huge Stones fan. I was a bit disappointed that there weren't more similar Easter eggs in this book. Alas, you can't always get what you want.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    In neither its catchy title nor its wordy subtitle (“How to Work with Your Emotions to Transform Hurt and Confusion into Energy That Empowers You”) is there the slightest hint that Emotional Rescue belongs to the body of contemporary Buddhist literature. The only clue comes from the name of its author, Dzogchen Ponlop, who, according to the biographical information on his website, was “recognized as a reincarnate lama of the Nyingma tradition, the seventh incarnation in the Dzogchen Ponlop linea In neither its catchy title nor its wordy subtitle (“How to Work with Your Emotions to Transform Hurt and Confusion into Energy That Empowers You”) is there the slightest hint that Emotional Rescue belongs to the body of contemporary Buddhist literature. The only clue comes from the name of its author, Dzogchen Ponlop, who, according to the biographical information on his website, was “recognized as a reincarnate lama of the Nyingma tradition, the seventh incarnation in the Dzogchen Ponlop lineage, [and] was formally enthroned as the 7th Dzogchen Ponlop at Rumtek in 1968, at the age of three.” So, even if you are put off by the self-help tone of his title (as I was), you might put aside your doubts and plunge in on the basis of Ponlop’s Buddhist lineage and scholarly credentials (as I did). But if you do, be prepared to require some emotional rescuing yourself. For what you will find in these pages is nothing other than a well-intentioned but ultimately banal treatise on positive thinking. Aimed squarely at readers looking for guidance on how to manage their turbulent emotions, Emotional Rescue will disappoint those readers who come to it looking instead for guidance on how to sharpen their meditation skills. As with just about every self-help book ever written, the problem lies with Ponlop’s oversimplified “one-size-fits-all” approach. His emotional rescue “plan” (referred to throughout the book by the awkward term “ER plan”) consists of a uniform three-step program to be followed by every reader whenever confronted with a difficult emotion, whatever its nature: (1) mindful gap, which means looking at whatever emotion has arisen with mindfulness. (2) clear seeing, which is not all that distinct from what the looking mindfully in the mindful gap step calls for, but which seems to mean a vague sort of exploring more deeply what you’ve already become mindful of in that first step. (3) letting go, which should need no explanation, but which Ponlop needlessly complicates by defining it as “relaxing” via a fivefold series of sensory relaxation exercises, each of which he modifies with an ill-fitting adjective - “fresh sight”, “natural sound”, “bright smell”, “pure taste”, and “clear touch”. It’s quite a challenge to take this cumbersome three-step process seriously, and equally difficult to imagine anyone putting themselves through the rigorous array of written exercises that Ponlop prescribes at each step along the way. At best, specific portions of the plan, and the specific exercises accompanying those portions, might be useful to a particular person stuck on a particularly difficult recurring emotion. But in that case, we are probably talking about an individual therapy situation, not a comprehensive program to be undertaken by the general reader in dealing with the full spectrum of everyday difficult emotions. And after all this, Ponlop adds to the reader’s dismay by introducing a second, equally oversimplified three-stage schemata, whereby followers of his ER plan gradually evolve from experiencing their emotions as “negative”, to experiencing these same emotions as “positive”, and then finally experiencing them as “neutral energy”. Those who successfully arrive at this endpoint are promised empowerment to become their best creative selves. In Ponlop’s system, letting go, which should signify the mindful practice of relaxing our habitual patterns of clinging and aversion, has morphed into the mindless new-age religion of grasping for personal fulfillment. We are no longer relinquishing clinging, we’re embracing it. Here indeed, we have arrived at a rendering of the Buddha as little more than a life coach. The question I continuously pondered while reading this book was “How?”. How could a respected scholar steeped in Buddhist teachings for the past five decades concoct such new-age banalities, and then present them as representative of Buddhist wisdom? Consider this one paragraph: “Positivity is more than an attitude or mode of thinking. It’s a force that goes beyond words – and you can feel its power in the world at times. When something extremely positive (or negative) occurs somewhere, that place seems to become invested with an energy that can be sensed. It becomes a kind of power spot. Across the planet there are many such spots … that attract visitors hoping for an extraordinary encounter – a magical experience of peace, healing, or awakening.” (pp. 117-118). Or consider instead just this one sentence: “The Buddha’s teachings are like a self-help project, kind of like what’s in the magazines in your doctor’s waiting room.” (p. 194). I’ve read this astonishing declaration several times, and I still have difficulty accepting that it was written, and published, by such a renowned Buddhist authority. I have to believe that Ponlop does not really believe this himself. I have to believe that he is just trying to be encouraging to those readers whom he so clearly wants to help with his ER plan. But I also have to believe that in his zeal to be helpful, he has gone quite a bit off the rails – hopefully, just this one time, just with this one book. The Buddha’s teachings are emphatically not like a self-help project. But regrettably, Emotional Rescue is very much like the forgettable pieces featured in those magazines in my doctor’s waiting room.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Denise Nader

    Esta edición que terminé fue el audiolibro. Lo leeré impreso, también; ahí haré la reseña.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shashi Martynova

    A helpful very simple manual on shamatha-vipashyana for emotions via body and to some extent thoughts. Buddhism as such is named and related to in the last fifth of the book, and before that it is carefully avoided. In a way it is like eating an orange without using one's hands, with sheer dexterity of the lips and teeth. And yes it makes the author a very good methodologist and teacher. I'd recommend that for anyone coping with pushy and nagging emotions (esp. anger, frustration, and easy annoya A helpful very simple manual on shamatha-vipashyana for emotions via body and to some extent thoughts. Buddhism as such is named and related to in the last fifth of the book, and before that it is carefully avoided. In a way it is like eating an orange without using one's hands, with sheer dexterity of the lips and teeth. And yes it makes the author a very good methodologist and teacher. I'd recommend that for anyone coping with pushy and nagging emotions (esp. anger, frustration, and easy annoyance) and trying to apply vipashyana to one's daily passions.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Al

    There is much reference to Buddhism in these reviews. However, there is pretty much no mention of Buddhism in this book, so don't let that be a block if Buddhism is not your thing. This book is a perfect example, in my opinion, of a deeply experienced practitioner, offering practical wisdom, accessible to anyone, without watering it down. The practices in the book, are not complicated, and can be easily learned by anyone. It is not an intellectual book, but a manual of practical application. My e There is much reference to Buddhism in these reviews. However, there is pretty much no mention of Buddhism in this book, so don't let that be a block if Buddhism is not your thing. This book is a perfect example, in my opinion, of a deeply experienced practitioner, offering practical wisdom, accessible to anyone, without watering it down. The practices in the book, are not complicated, and can be easily learned by anyone. It is not an intellectual book, but a manual of practical application. My experience is simply this: Practicing what is outlined in the book, leads to the result outlined in the book. An improved relationship with emotions, improved quality of life, reduction in fear, improved relationship with others, greater sense of joy. This is my actual experience, even in relatively early days. It does take practice. It is not a huge book, but I am needing to absorb is slowly and steadily, and will revisit many times. The results come immediately, but deepen over time and with practice. Highly recommended

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    DNF. BORING and the narration was not good. This just didn't appeal to me, so I am giving this one a miss after two chapters. DNF. BORING and the narration was not good. This just didn't appeal to me, so I am giving this one a miss after two chapters.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

    I really didn't enjoy the presentation of Buddhist teachings in such a 'self-help' format. I'm sure this is a great approach for some people, but it really didn't work for me. I found it tedious to read and sort of 'infomercial' like. I did enjoy the final section, where DPR canters through the three yanas and the Abidharma without naming any of them. That was a nice example of how to present Buddhist teachings in a secular way. I really didn't enjoy the presentation of Buddhist teachings in such a 'self-help' format. I'm sure this is a great approach for some people, but it really didn't work for me. I found it tedious to read and sort of 'infomercial' like. I did enjoy the final section, where DPR canters through the three yanas and the Abidharma without naming any of them. That was a nice example of how to present Buddhist teachings in a secular way.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Mahnke

    This book is the assigned reading for a retreat I'll be attending with Pema Chödrön this weekend (May 5-6, 2018). It just didn't do anything for me. Pop culture-y. With practice activities that I hope we don't have to do during the retreat, at least not in the way they are presented in this book. The last part of the book, in which some key Buddhist teachings are presented in a digestible format, and in which the author links these teachings to the main theme of the book (in a nutshell - workin This book is the assigned reading for a retreat I'll be attending with Pema Chödrön this weekend (May 5-6, 2018). It just didn't do anything for me. Pop culture-y. With practice activities that I hope we don't have to do during the retreat, at least not in the way they are presented in this book. The last part of the book, in which some key Buddhist teachings are presented in a digestible format, and in which the author links these teachings to the main theme of the book (in a nutshell - working with even our most difficult emotions in a positive way, appreciating their energy, and using them for growth), redeemed it somewhat for me. Back from my retreat now. Pema used this book in just exactly the right way. As a backdrop for her own teachings and message. Upon reflection and after hearing others at the retreat talk about the book - I think it might be quite useful for younger people working through difficult times. It is very accessible, with simple, step-by-step exercises and activities. Might be good for young ones struggling through puberty, for example.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sergio Ledward

    Una vez más Ponlop Rinpoche nos regala una enseñanza plena de sabiduría y compasión... En un lenguaje claro, sencillo, actual y lleno de sentido del humor. Precioso libro para entender las emociones y llevar un poco de paz al mundo

  12. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This is a great beginner book on getting in touch with your emotions. It is filled with practical ideas and exercises. It would absolutely not be offensive to the most conservative of lifestyles. This would be a great book for teens as well!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Geri Degruy

    Good tools for working with difficult emotions in our difficult world.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mindy Kannon

    Super interesting and practical book about how to use meditation and other mindful techniques to gain from harmful negative emotions. Really useful!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Ryan

    I read a lot of Buddhist teachings these days. My Women's circle has gone through this book chapter by chapter over the last year. Everyone likes it. I read a lot of Buddhist teachings these days. My Women's circle has gone through this book chapter by chapter over the last year. Everyone likes it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Monica Udell

    3.5

  17. 4 out of 5

    Indie

    I read this book in conjunction with an online class with Pema Chodron. I got so much from the clear examples and exercises. I definitely want to read more books by Ponlop!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Another great book that I definitely needed to read. As they say, it's all in divine timing and when the student is ready, the teacher will appear. This book appeared when I was struggling with some behaviors of others that I didn't like or believe in. It has given me tools to learn how to better deal with situations as such, and how I can guard and protect myself from such life's events that may have previously disturbed my peace of mind. The steps will take time and practice, but if it means I Another great book that I definitely needed to read. As they say, it's all in divine timing and when the student is ready, the teacher will appear. This book appeared when I was struggling with some behaviors of others that I didn't like or believe in. It has given me tools to learn how to better deal with situations as such, and how I can guard and protect myself from such life's events that may have previously disturbed my peace of mind. The steps will take time and practice, but if it means I am calm and peaceful and do not let the behaviors/actions/words of others to dampen my very bright and shining light! Very grateful to be a Goodreads winner of this book!

  19. 5 out of 5

    LemontreeLime

    2016 review Its interesting in the way it presents Buddhism bare bones and desecularized. But it kind of left me cold, maybe the modern spin was too hep for me. 2020 review Actually? I accidentally listened to this again without remembering I had before. I was trying to find something that would speak to my niece & nephews, help them think outside their boxes. This was perfect for that. In hindsight, it is quite brilliant. Will add stars. So maybe this is slow drip wisdom. Worth the revisit.

  20. 5 out of 5

    José Marcio da Silva

    Um plano de resgate emocional é apresentado. Um maior conhecimento e conscientização sobre as emoções é adquirido durante a leitura.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Victor Miranda

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dana Biscotti

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  25. 4 out of 5

    John

  26. 4 out of 5

    Connie Assadi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Senshin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ane

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ralph

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