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James Machie was a man with a genius for violence, his criminal empire spreading beyond Glasgow into the UK and mainland Europe. Fortunately, James Machie is dead, assassinated in the back of a prison ambulance following his trial and conviction. But now, five years later, he is apparently back from the grave, set on avenging himself on those who brought him down. Top of hi James Machie was a man with a genius for violence, his criminal empire spreading beyond Glasgow into the UK and mainland Europe. Fortunately, James Machie is dead, assassinated in the back of a prison ambulance following his trial and conviction. But now, five years later, he is apparently back from the grave, set on avenging himself on those who brought him down. Top of his list is his previous associate, Frank MacDougall, who unbeknownst to D.C.I. Jim Daley, is living under protection on his lochside patch, the small Scottish town of Kinloch. Daley knows that, having been the key to Machie’s conviction, his old friend and colleague D.S. Scott is almost as big a target. And nothing, not even death, has ever stood in James Machie’s way.


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James Machie was a man with a genius for violence, his criminal empire spreading beyond Glasgow into the UK and mainland Europe. Fortunately, James Machie is dead, assassinated in the back of a prison ambulance following his trial and conviction. But now, five years later, he is apparently back from the grave, set on avenging himself on those who brought him down. Top of hi James Machie was a man with a genius for violence, his criminal empire spreading beyond Glasgow into the UK and mainland Europe. Fortunately, James Machie is dead, assassinated in the back of a prison ambulance following his trial and conviction. But now, five years later, he is apparently back from the grave, set on avenging himself on those who brought him down. Top of his list is his previous associate, Frank MacDougall, who unbeknownst to D.C.I. Jim Daley, is living under protection on his lochside patch, the small Scottish town of Kinloch. Daley knows that, having been the key to Machie’s conviction, his old friend and colleague D.S. Scott is almost as big a target. And nothing, not even death, has ever stood in James Machie’s way.

30 review for The Last Witness

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paromjit

    I listened to this on audio, because it was narrated by the wonderful David Monteath, and I had loved listening to him read Dark Suits and Sad Songs. So we return to Kinloch for a shocker of a story. 5 years previously, notorious crime lord James Machie had been shot dead in a prison van ambush, along with others. To everyone's consternation, there is now video of a resurrected James Machie in Australia brutally killing a man who had testified against him, as well as his wife. Fear ripples throu I listened to this on audio, because it was narrated by the wonderful David Monteath, and I had loved listening to him read Dark Suits and Sad Songs. So we return to Kinloch for a shocker of a story. 5 years previously, notorious crime lord James Machie had been shot dead in a prison van ambush, along with others. To everyone's consternation, there is now video of a resurrected James Machie in Australia brutally killing a man who had testified against him, as well as his wife. Fear ripples through the police when a member of Frank MacDougall's family is killed, assumed to be Machie as evidence emerges of his return to Scotland by helicopter, and him being responsible for another death. Anyone involved in securing the conviction of James Machie has good reason to be afraid and this includes DCI Jim Daley and DS Brian Scott. Frank, another criminal gang leader, has been under the witness protection programme ever since giving evidence against Machie, now he and his entire family are in danger as Machie goes on the rampage, with the police struggling to find any leads that can help them locate him. How has James Machie come back to the land of the living? This is a blood drenched story of revenge and betrayal, whilst Daley's personal life begins to fall apart and he begins to harbour suspicions of the obnoxious Superintendent John Donald. A wonderfully entertaining addition to this brilliant series which I recommend highly.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    The book begins with a couple of vignettes guaranteed to get your attention. In the first, legendary Glasgow gangster James Machie is being transported back to prison from hospital when the ambulance is….erm….intercepted. Suffice to say he won’t have to worry about serving out those 5 life sentences. The second takes place 5 years later in Melbourne. Gerald used to run with the Machie clan. After giving evidence at Machie’s trial, he & his wife got new identities & were whisked away to Australia The book begins with a couple of vignettes guaranteed to get your attention. In the first, legendary Glasgow gangster James Machie is being transported back to prison from hospital when the ambulance is….erm….intercepted. Suffice to say he won’t have to worry about serving out those 5 life sentences. The second takes place 5 years later in Melbourne. Gerald used to run with the Machie clan. After giving evidence at Machie’s trial, he & his wife got new identities & were whisked away to Australia. You’d think that would be far enough. You’d be wrong. The attack itself is brutal but when the killer’s face is caught on CCTV, jaws drop in police stations right across Scotland. For Kinloch DCI Jim Daley, it qualifies as a full-on WTF moment. Five years ago he & colleague DS Brian Scott were largely responsible for the case that finally put away much of the notorious Machie clan. It was a stressful & dangerous time. Many of the cops received death threats & Brian was shot. When Jim was transferred to Kinloch by Superintendent John Donald (a total git, BTW, but I digress….) he saw it as a chance to slow down, relax & spend more time with his wife. It’s good to have a dream, Jim. But the reality is the killing didn’t end in Melbourne. Family members of Machie’s old goon squad begin to drop like flies. It seems someone is getting revenge on those who helped put Machie away. Jim & Brian are grateful to be far from Glasgow until Supt. Donald comes clean. One of the biggest rats was Frank MacDougall & he & his family disappeared into witness protection after the trial. In fact they’ve been stashed on a farm outside Kinloch for the last 5 years. This is the first I’ve read from this author & I really enjoyed it. There are several sub-plots running along side the main story line which revolves around “just how dead is he” James Machie. Office politics, a bent insider, old mobsters who would sell their mother & Jim’s personal life all contribute to a thorny, fast paced story. Characters range from the enigmatic to the colourful. Brian in particular was a bit of a challenge. Dialogue is written to reflect the vernacular of where he grew up & his accent could mince haggis. Much is cleared up by the end but there are a few loose threads that will have major repercussions for several characters in the future. This is actually book #2 in the series after Whisky From Small Glasses & I look forward to getting my hands on the next one to see how it plays out.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    The Last Witness by Denzil Meyrick is the second in the series based on the fictional Scottish town of Kinloch. They are police procedurals and feature DCI Jim Daley and his longstanding colleague and mate DS Scott. If there was any doubt, this second book underlines the ability of the author. Always gritty and engrossing the writing quickly brings you into the story and maintains your interest throughout. Perhaps he lets us down more gently as the book closes purely to allow the reader to breath The Last Witness by Denzil Meyrick is the second in the series based on the fictional Scottish town of Kinloch. They are police procedurals and feature DCI Jim Daley and his longstanding colleague and mate DS Scott. If there was any doubt, this second book underlines the ability of the author. Always gritty and engrossing the writing quickly brings you into the story and maintains your interest throughout. Perhaps he lets us down more gently as the book closes purely to allow the reader to breathe and prepare for the next instalment. Some may find this a commercial ploy and argue a book should standalone but unless one produces an epilogue longer than the actual story the plot extensions need to run on. Book 3 is already published, so the wait isn’t a long one and the quality of this series means anyone who enjoys this novel will already be searching out this author anyway. That said, spoiler alert at the end of The Last Witness you will have as many questions as you have answers and to satisfy the need for completeness will want to continue with these characters’ journeys. The Last Witness is essentially a novel about revenge. Glasgow gangland boss James Machie was betrayed by his partners in crime and paid the ultimate price following his arrest he was mercilessly despatched in a prison convey. The current team know the details well enough they were in court before he met his demise and heard his threats to settle scores with them and his former associates. The main two villains who gave evidence against him are placed into the witness protection scheme and for a long time their new lives go on unchecked. When a crime is committed on the other side of the world it has repercussions for Daley and his team, and his boss Donald prepares them for the unthinkable when CCTV seems to reveal a ghost from the past. The quiet secluded life of this tranquil community is about to shattered as the crimes of Glasgow seem closer to Kinloch than the more traditional pursuits of smuggling and tax avoidance. Daley who is still trying to fit in himself has more unsettling news to process and his personal story plunges into darkness and suspicion. If only he learns to trust Hamish an enigmatic character who seems to discern most things but speaks in riddles. A great story, full of dark humour and serious violence. All bound together by expansive writing and authentic dialectal dialogue, which takes time to master, but only adds to one’s enjoyment of this wonderful book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    I received this from Edelweiss and W. W. Norton publishers in exchange for an honest review. I love Tartan noir, so my review may be somewhat biased. I really, really, really liked this one! A great sophomore effort from Mr. Meyrick, with fantastic development of the characters. A direct sequel to Whisky From Small Glasses, the plot was easy to follow and the subsequent plot twists were simply outstanding. Meyrick's writing reminds me a lot of early Stuart MacBride in the Logan McRae series. Gre I received this from Edelweiss and W. W. Norton publishers in exchange for an honest review. I love Tartan noir, so my review may be somewhat biased. I really, really, really liked this one! A great sophomore effort from Mr. Meyrick, with fantastic development of the characters. A direct sequel to Whisky From Small Glasses, the plot was easy to follow and the subsequent plot twists were simply outstanding. Meyrick's writing reminds me a lot of early Stuart MacBride in the Logan McRae series. Great stuff! I'm looking forward to the next book in the series!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Utterly brilliant second outing from this author. I was totally hooked from the opening (and explosive) prologue and first chapters, and struggled thereafter to put the book down. The pace is fast, the plot twists were superb, and the characters are so easily believable. I hd eagerly awaited the release of this book and, I am pleased to say, I was not disappointed. The only downside is, I'm now eagerly awaiting his third book! Utterly brilliant second outing from this author. I was totally hooked from the opening (and explosive) prologue and first chapters, and struggled thereafter to put the book down. The pace is fast, the plot twists were superb, and the characters are so easily believable. I hd eagerly awaited the release of this book and, I am pleased to say, I was not disappointed. The only downside is, I'm now eagerly awaiting his third book!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emma Clapperton

    I loved this book. The last half of the book was fast paced and I read it so quickly so I could find out what happened. I love Daley and Brian Scott and I can't wait to read the third instalment. I especially enjoyed the Scottish dialect because I was able to read it in the accent intended which was an extra treat. I have Dalintober Moon ready to read until Dark Suits and Sad Songs comes out ;) I loved this book. The last half of the book was fast paced and I read it so quickly so I could find out what happened. I love Daley and Brian Scott and I can't wait to read the third instalment. I especially enjoyed the Scottish dialect because I was able to read it in the accent intended which was an extra treat. I have Dalintober Moon ready to read until Dark Suits and Sad Songs comes out ;)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Denzil Meyrick’s The Last Witness (2015) introduces Detective Chief Inspector Jim Daley of Glasgow’s police. Years earlier Daley, aided by inside informants, had been a central figure in breaking up a powerful crime family—the Machie gang led by Godfather James (“JayMac”) Machie. The turncoats went into witness protection but now they are turning up extremely dead, neither police custody nor witness protection able to protect them. And there are sightings of a ghost: Daley had watched JayMac’s b Denzil Meyrick’s The Last Witness (2015) introduces Detective Chief Inspector Jim Daley of Glasgow’s police. Years earlier Daley, aided by inside informants, had been a central figure in breaking up a powerful crime family—the Machie gang led by Godfather James (“JayMac”) Machie. The turncoats went into witness protection but now they are turning up extremely dead, neither police custody nor witness protection able to protect them. And there are sightings of a ghost: Daley had watched JayMac’s body cremated years earlier following his assassination, but it appears that JayMac is back from the dead. And JayMac is mad! Much of the story is told in that lovely Scottish brogue that pleases the ear and offends the eye. Be prepared for dialogue likeAye, that’s as may be. The fermers have a wile struggle tae make ends meet, these days, especially the wans wi’ the wee mixed ferms. Every bugger an’ his freens are efter their wee bit money. I’m no’ tryin’ tae influence ye, mind—jeest letting you know.Even a world champion speed reader will feel those speed bumps. The avenger is remarkably capable: he kills a couple in Australia and is working his way through the family of Frank McDougall, JayMac’s former lieutenant. Daley knows that he and his family are on the hit list, so he has a very personal reason to try to put the toothpaste back in the tube. He and his sidekick—the fumbling Brian Scott—an acquaintance of JayMac’s since Scott’s youth in a Glasgow gang—are on the job tracking down the avenger as he does his thing: mutilating McDougall’s elderly aunt and killing his children, blowing up Daley’s car and house, killing a policeman. Yet, we wonder, isn’t this a bit too pat? The arisen JayMac seems happy to leave DNA and photographs to identify himself. Is he bragging about his resurrection, or is it perhaps a setup to divert attention from the real murderer and their personal motives? Well, we just have to read on to find out. The story was decent but the strong dialect—and lots of it—was an impediment for me even though it added verisimilitude. Perhaps if I had more Scotch in me… Three stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Noelle

    When I read "Whiskey in Small Glasses" by Denzil Meyrick I was instantly captured by this author's style. The characters were likeable and real. So when I finished it I wondered how Denzil was going to match this and would I see the realism in the characters again. I was more than pleasantly surprised when I started reading this book as not only did we see some of the same characters...the storyline had me shouting in the night...waking my neighbours with screams of "oh no!" and "oh my god!". I When I read "Whiskey in Small Glasses" by Denzil Meyrick I was instantly captured by this author's style. The characters were likeable and real. So when I finished it I wondered how Denzil was going to match this and would I see the realism in the characters again. I was more than pleasantly surprised when I started reading this book as not only did we see some of the same characters...the storyline had me shouting in the night...waking my neighbours with screams of "oh no!" and "oh my god!". I can usually tell within the first few chapters whether or not a book is worth reading and once again, Mr Meyrick impressed me instantly. The story reintroduces us to Jim Daley and the trials and tribulations of a small Scottish Village Kinloch. I now want to go there!! I also loved the writing style of incorporating the accents within the story...and found myself instantly within the pages as if I was a part of the story myself! Words fail me as this book was amazing. I was sad when it ended but pleased at the same time because I think we are going to be lucky enough to join Daley and Scott in another gripping crime in Kinloch again! Well done Denzil. I will be recommending this book to everyone I know. Thank you for the pleasure of reading this book. I want to describe each and every chapter but that wouldn't be fair to those who haven't read it yet. It's not just a book...it is an experience and a journey that I am looking forward to being a part of again!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Deb Jones

    There's a lot of story going on in The Last Witness. The action and suspense begin in the first pages and don't let go until the end. There are the main plot and enough subplots to keep even the most jaded reader fully involved. There's a lot of story going on in The Last Witness. The action and suspense begin in the first pages and don't let go until the end. There are the main plot and enough subplots to keep even the most jaded reader fully involved.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    I’d like to say a few things about this book. I don’t feel qualified somehow. It was good, original and atmospheric. I enjoyed it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Luanne Ollivier

    The Last Witness by Denzil Meyrick is the second book in his Detective Daley series. Now, I haven't read the first book, but didn't feel lost at all in The Last Witness. (although the first one sounds cracking good) The Last Witness is the first book in the series to be published in North America. The series is set in Scotland. James Machie was a criminal kingpin in Glasgow. Five years ago he was assinated in the back of a transport vehicle. Then how in the world is on camera today killing those The Last Witness by Denzil Meyrick is the second book in his Detective Daley series. Now, I haven't read the first book, but didn't feel lost at all in The Last Witness. (although the first one sounds cracking good) The Last Witness is the first book in the series to be published in North America. The series is set in Scotland. James Machie was a criminal kingpin in Glasgow. Five years ago he was assinated in the back of a transport vehicle. Then how in the world is on camera today killing those who testified against him? His former right hand man Frank MacDougall, has been in the witness protection program for the last five years. Jim Daley is stunned to find out that Frank has been living on his patch for the entire time. And that he now responsible for the safety of Frank and his family. I liked Jim as a character, but I have to say that my favourite is his Sergeant, Brian Scott. His irreverent attitude is great fun and the perfect foil against their Superintendent, John Scott. (who's a piece of work) Daley plays peacemaker between the two. Meyrick's dialogue is written as it would be spoken - Scottish brogue and all. I found it easy after a few pages, but some may not. There's also a fair amount of swearing and lots of drinking. Again, it fits the tone of the book, the characters and the setting. But some may be offended. Meyrick has penned an imaginative plot, filled it with lots of action and created characters I would revisit again. He also has a dark sense of humour that mixes well with the noir feeling of The Last Witness. Meyrick is writing what he knows, in settings, characters and plotting. "Denzil Meyrick was educated in Argyll, then after studying politics, joined the Strathclyde Police, serving in Glasgow. After being injured and developing back problems, he now works as a freelance journalist in both print and on radio. Denzil lives in Scotland." His prose absolutely have the ring of authenticity and accuracy. And although the ending tied up things nicely, there's one or two questions about Daley's personal life that will hopefully be answered in the next book - one I'll be reading. Fans of Stuart MacBride would enjoy Meyrick's writing.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    DCI Jim Daley has his hand full of both personal life problem and the investigation. The characters are likable with each with their own background that surely will gradually reveal or weave into new plots. The case was about revenge, there were twist after twist (mini twist, though) but a bit skeptical to me. Overall The Last Witness is an enjoyable read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Bridges

    DS Brian Scott and DCI Jim Daley arrested notorious gangster, James Machie, five years ago and on the way to prison he was killed. How is it possible that JayMac is back and planning his revenge on the people who put him away. And where does that leave Scott and Daley? This is apparently the second novel in the Daley series and now that I have read it, I definitely intend to go back and read the first one - always the sign of an enjoyable book! It did not really detract from the story not having DS Brian Scott and DCI Jim Daley arrested notorious gangster, James Machie, five years ago and on the way to prison he was killed. How is it possible that JayMac is back and planning his revenge on the people who put him away. And where does that leave Scott and Daley? This is apparently the second novel in the Daley series and now that I have read it, I definitely intend to go back and read the first one - always the sign of an enjoyable book! It did not really detract from the story not having read it, but I would like to know the full story of JayMac's arrest and so on as I did find the relationships between the criminals interesting. Even though I have obviously missed some background story, I found the characters of Scott, Daley and Donald very real and extremely rounded and I quickly felt sympathy for the policemen caught up in this awful situation. I have to declare now that I really don't like speech which is written phonetically and it is a sign that I enjoyed this book that I almost managed to forget about that aspect. I also found the relationhship between Scott and the criminals he had grown up with very believable and clearly very difficult - Meyrick is clearly an excellent observer of human nature and this comes across very clearly in the novel. All in all, I really enjoyed "The Last Witness" and would highly recommend it as an easy, but interesting read. I had a small issue with the explanation of JayMac's amazing "return", but the rest of it was down to earth and very believable. I shall go and put "Whiskey From Small Glasses" on my wishlist straightaway.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pat (currently not accepting new friend requests)

    I really enjoyed the first book in this series - Whiskey From Small Glasses. It was a satisfying but not very pacy read. This though was pretty full on from the get go. A double homicide in Australia gets the attention of the Kinloch police because an image from that scene shows a dead man. Glasgow gangland boss James Machie was finally captured five years ago after some of his crew gave evidence against him in exchange for immunity. But during transport the van he is travelling is attacked and t I really enjoyed the first book in this series - Whiskey From Small Glasses. It was a satisfying but not very pacy read. This though was pretty full on from the get go. A double homicide in Australia gets the attention of the Kinloch police because an image from that scene shows a dead man. Glasgow gangland boss James Machie was finally captured five years ago after some of his crew gave evidence against him in exchange for immunity. But during transport the van he is travelling is attacked and the guards and Machie are gunned down. The end. But wait... Pretty soon Machie is back in Scotland. It seems he is killing everyone who betrayed him and he's making sure they know its him. DCI Jim Daley and bagman DS Scott can't work out how he cheated death but are pretty bloody concerned because they were involved with the original arrest. Also, the remaining witness against Machie is in witness protection, in hiding, but no one is convinced he is safe. The sense of menace is quite palpable as the ruthless Machie continues his quest for vengeance taking no prisoners. Can Daley and Scott stop him, or will they too fall victim to this bloody rampage. These characters are well portrayed and its easy to get invested in them. This could turn into a damn fine series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Gilchrist

    Another outstanding book, a real page turner. Also finished with the next book in mind .I look forward to that coming out.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Giles Burrows

    I've enjoyed other books in this series but I got a bit bogged down in this one, and just got really confused about the plot. I've enjoyed other books in this series but I got a bit bogged down in this one, and just got really confused about the plot.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lainy

    Time taken to read - in and out over 3 days Pages - 320 Publisher - Polygon Source - Waterstones Blurb from Goodreads James Machie was a man with a genius for violence, his criminal empire spreading beyond Glasgow into the UK and mainland Europe. Fortunately, James Machie is dead, assassinated in the back of a prison ambulance following his trial and conviction. But now, five years later, he is apparently back from the grave, set on avenging himself on those who brought him down. Top of his list is h Time taken to read - in and out over 3 days Pages - 320 Publisher - Polygon Source - Waterstones Blurb from Goodreads James Machie was a man with a genius for violence, his criminal empire spreading beyond Glasgow into the UK and mainland Europe. Fortunately, James Machie is dead, assassinated in the back of a prison ambulance following his trial and conviction. But now, five years later, he is apparently back from the grave, set on avenging himself on those who brought him down. Top of his list is his previous associate, Frank MacDougall, who unbeknownst to D.C.I. Jim Daley, is living under protection on his lochside patch, the small Scottish town of Kinloch. Daley knows that, having been the key to Machie’s conviction, his old friend and colleague D.S. Scott is almost as big a target. And nothing, not even death, has ever stood in James Machie’s way. My Review James Machie was one of the most brutal criminals Daley and Scott had to deal with before he was killed. Now it seems the impossible has happened, Machie is back, he is on a killing mission and has no problems hiding it. The police are freaked out, the people that betrayed him know he is coming for them but how do you defend yourself against a ghost? A brutal killing opens the book, a few years later someone in witness protection/relocation is horrifically killed. The killer happy to show his face has the cops confused, weirded out and knowing it can't be him, can it? The hunt is on for the killer, the police have to move quickly before the killer gets to his targets. He is taunting them and the chase is on, who will die next and how is the killer back from the dead? I do enjoy Meyricks writing, the characters are great and love or hate them you want to know what is coming next. As well as the killer and threat to the officers lives we have the politics within the police ranks and Daley's personal life and woes. Sometimes when you have the personal aspect as well as the crimes it can be frustrating or dull, not so with Daley. I always want to know what is coming next for him, he is such a decent guy and you are always rooting for the team. The book as with the first one has some Scottish humour in the way the team/locals interact which I love, it is true to life in the way small communities are with their own and if you don't laugh it will minimally draw a smile from you. I have all the other books to read and cannot wait to see what is coming next 4.5/5 for me this time.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chrystyna

    The Last Witness by Denzil Meyrick - Good The second in the series featuring DCI Jim Daley and his team. Since their first outing, Daley is now permanently located in Kinloch with a support team there plus the occasional visit from those based in Glasgow. Life has settled down for him and his wife and they are enjoying their new location. Of course, things are about to change. Earlier in his career he was involved in breaking up a major crime syndicate and jailing the gang leader....except he neve The Last Witness by Denzil Meyrick - Good The second in the series featuring DCI Jim Daley and his team. Since their first outing, Daley is now permanently located in Kinloch with a support team there plus the occasional visit from those based in Glasgow. Life has settled down for him and his wife and they are enjoying their new location. Of course, things are about to change. Earlier in his career he was involved in breaking up a major crime syndicate and jailing the gang leader....except he never made it to jail, shot in an ambush before he could get there. The witnesses were all given new names and lives but now someone is picking them off and it appears he is back from the dead and Daley and his team are on his hitlist along with 'the last witness' who just happens to have been relocated to Kinloch. Time for the team to get on the case. Great page turner. Perfect for my holiday read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    There's something about the accents of some narrators that just make things so easy to listen to and David Monteath is doing a terrific job with the DCI Jim Daley series. There's enough wry, dry humour here, alongside some reasonably gritty plot lines to keep the reader engaged, although the series does have a hefty dose of the personal as well if you're a fan of that sort of thing. Daley has a complicated sort of a lovelife with a wife he doesn't exactly trust, a new position in a small Scottis There's something about the accents of some narrators that just make things so easy to listen to and David Monteath is doing a terrific job with the DCI Jim Daley series. There's enough wry, dry humour here, alongside some reasonably gritty plot lines to keep the reader engaged, although the series does have a hefty dose of the personal as well if you're a fan of that sort of thing. Daley has a complicated sort of a lovelife with a wife he doesn't exactly trust, a new position in a small Scottish town (introduced in book 1 in the series: Whisky From Small Glasses and a surprisingly active Scottish gangster population surrounding him. Another one of those quintessentially Scottish sounding audible books - perfect for listening to over an extended period of time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Colette Lamberth

    This was just as compelling as book 1 in the series. I chose the audible version as I knew my reading time would be limited but also as I knew that David Monteath’s narration would be perfect. Daley and Scott are back in Kinloch for an investigation. There is an awful lot going on in this book and I did find myself a bit confused at times as there seemed to be a huge cast of characters. Ultimately I have been left wanting more so lucky for me that I have book 3 ready to go.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Kemp

    Really pleased I came across this writer

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carole

    The second in the series featuring DCI Jim Daley and his team. Since their first outing, Daley is now permanently located in Kinloch with a support team there plus the occasional visit from those based in Glasgow. Life has settled down for him and his wife and they are enjoying their new location. Of course, things are about to change. I enjoyed the book, the plot was enjoyable and moved along at a good rate, unwinding nicely in a fairly believable manner although maybe the secret twin part was The second in the series featuring DCI Jim Daley and his team. Since their first outing, Daley is now permanently located in Kinloch with a support team there plus the occasional visit from those based in Glasgow. Life has settled down for him and his wife and they are enjoying their new location. Of course, things are about to change. I enjoyed the book, the plot was enjoyable and moved along at a good rate, unwinding nicely in a fairly believable manner although maybe the secret twin part was a bit weak (and confusing).

  23. 4 out of 5

    ReadandRated

    After enjoying Whisky From Small Glasses (sounds like a great hobby as well as a title for a gritty new Scottish crime thriller!), I quickly bought The Last Witness for my reading pile. Jim Daley is now a DCI after a bit of a slap dash promotion during the first book and his character feels more comfortable, more rounded (in several ways) and more at home in his role and his environment. I really like Jim Daley, although I still picture him in my mind as Barnaby from Midsummer, albeit a sweary Ba After enjoying Whisky From Small Glasses (sounds like a great hobby as well as a title for a gritty new Scottish crime thriller!), I quickly bought The Last Witness for my reading pile. Jim Daley is now a DCI after a bit of a slap dash promotion during the first book and his character feels more comfortable, more rounded (in several ways) and more at home in his role and his environment. I really like Jim Daley, although I still picture him in my mind as Barnaby from Midsummer, albeit a sweary Barnaby! The story itself is great, complex in places, simple in others with another layer of threads woven in which – much like in WFSG – clearly pave the way to be continued in a future book. I think this is a great touch and is missing from a lot of books which stick with beginning, middle and end – Denzil Meyrick manages to do all that and also include a ‘what if’. I did get a weeny bit lost in one part of the story but I’m not sure if the muddle was my own head or if it wasn’t all that clear in the book. I very quickly got back on track though and whatever the reason for it, it didn’t detract from my enjoyment or understanding of the story. My dislike of the promiscuity of one character is continued throughout this book, again a matter which in my opinion is treated bizarrely lightly given the potential consequences. Overall a very welcome addition to the crime thriller market and I look forward to reading more by Denzil Meyrick; and I would imagine we’ll be seeing them televised too as the scenes are so easy to picture and would lend themselves incredibly well to a TV series. Loving the cover artwork on this one too, it’s a far more professional look to the original cover on Whisky From Small Glasses which has the more homespun look of a self published novel.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. SO. I wanted to like this series. So badly. Some of the characters are quite good (Brian Scott)...and I gotta say, I do like the titles...but there was always something just a little off. It took reading this entire book for me to figure it out. THE FEMALE CHARACTERS. They're hideously sexist. There are no "women with agency" or "strong women" here. Take Liz - she's around to have sex with Jim. Then there's Sarah - who evidently is "smart and beautiful and sexy" and ultimately enjoyed be raped. SO. I wanted to like this series. So badly. Some of the characters are quite good (Brian Scott)...and I gotta say, I do like the titles...but there was always something just a little off. It took reading this entire book for me to figure it out. THE FEMALE CHARACTERS. They're hideously sexist. There are no "women with agency" or "strong women" here. Take Liz - she's around to have sex with Jim. Then there's Sarah - who evidently is "smart and beautiful and sexy" and ultimately enjoyed be raped. Add in Betty who's useless (dementia) and the old aunt (forget her name) who's a victim of really terrible (in my opinion unnecessary) violence. And finally, the only woman who seems to be there to do actual work DC Dunn - then Daley decides she's pretty cute by the end of the novel (spoiler for the next book: when it opens they've been screwing for seven months and when Daley breaks it off to go back to his wife, she goes psycho wine drinking, glass throwing bitch). So we have the battered woman, the she-liked-it victim, the sexy innocent, the crazy girlfriend, and the sluttly wife. The male characters are better developed, but the women in this book made me sick. I read the next one (ok, skimmed) just because I wanted to see the baby and the relationship. Mysteries aren't good enough to keep me reading either.

  25. 4 out of 5

    J.R.

    A dead man returns to wreak vengeance on those who betrayed him. A stunning premise for the U.S. debut of a Scots Noir series with an interesting protagonist, plenty of action and lots of surprises. Considering that premise some might be led to suspect a paranormal aspect to the plot. But, no, Denzil Meyrick provides a solid, logical explanation for the events, though he doles it out slowly in increments to keep up the suspense. The fact a number of the killer's victims are tucked away in Witness A dead man returns to wreak vengeance on those who betrayed him. A stunning premise for the U.S. debut of a Scots Noir series with an interesting protagonist, plenty of action and lots of surprises. Considering that premise some might be led to suspect a paranormal aspect to the plot. But, no, Denzil Meyrick provides a solid, logical explanation for the events, though he doles it out slowly in increments to keep up the suspense. The fact a number of the killer's victims are tucked away in Witness Protection would ordinarily stretch credence. Meyrick again manages to provide a realistic and satisfying answer for how they are tracked down. Meyrick's background, which includes a stint as a police officer, adds to the authenticity of the story. Recently promoted Detective Chief Inspector Jim Daley, overweight, out of shape, still getting used to his new position and authority, is a sympathetic and engaging character. His friend and colleague DS Brian Scott, slovenly and fond of drink, adds a bit of humor to help tone down the darkness and violence of the plot. Some readers may be put off by the heavy reliance on dialect. I soon got accustomed to the rhythm and found it no real hindrance to my enjoyment. Overall, an enjoyable read and I look forward to more in the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    I'll include some spoilers because as much as I liked this book, there was one part that angered me. Great book overall. It was surprising to see the cops that were so full of bravado in the first book absolutely shaken in this book. A couple instances of a murder from a first-person perspective (that of the victim) were pretty chilling to read. That said, the "secret twin" plot device is pretty lazy. Denzil Meyrick is such a talented writer that the use of this plot device seems particularly egr I'll include some spoilers because as much as I liked this book, there was one part that angered me. Great book overall. It was surprising to see the cops that were so full of bravado in the first book absolutely shaken in this book. A couple instances of a murder from a first-person perspective (that of the victim) were pretty chilling to read. That said, the "secret twin" plot device is pretty lazy. Denzil Meyrick is such a talented writer that the use of this plot device seems particularly egregious. Meyrick includes an almost uncomfortable amount of realism in this book - one character comments on the feeling of his eyebrows singeing as he runs through a fire, a cop being stalked worries that the sound of pissing himself is going to give away his hiding place, and a machete murder is written from the victim's perspective. To go from that to a soap opera level plot device like a secret twin or a coma fantasy is just insulting to the readers and to Meyrick's reputation. I'm going to keep reading Meyrick's books because I'm invested in the characters and love how he fleshes out the small town. But I certainly hope he doesn't stoop to such lows in a third act again.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    This was sent to me by Lovereading to review. Wow impressed what an explosive read and I have not read Meyrick's first book. So as you have gathered this is the sequel. Taggart meets Rebus. Essentially DCI Jim Daley a Scottish detective and the man he convicted is out to get him. The storyline is fast with twists and turns. Meyrick writes a great Scottish detective novel, his writing is good and his characters are real. This book will be definitely be in the top ten this summer. I eagerly await his nex This was sent to me by Lovereading to review. Wow impressed what an explosive read and I have not read Meyrick's first book. So as you have gathered this is the sequel. Taggart meets Rebus. Essentially DCI Jim Daley a Scottish detective and the man he convicted is out to get him. The storyline is fast with twists and turns. Meyrick writes a great Scottish detective novel, his writing is good and his characters are real. This book will be definitely be in the top ten this summer. I eagerly await his next book- powerful stuff.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vanessab

    Well, this is fast paced and has plenty of action in it. However, I did not enjoy it at all. The dialect is so intrusive and often incomprehensible. I found myself skipping the dialogue. The sudden introduction of his wife's apparent infidelity seems out of character and draws my attention to the very poor portrayal of the women characters. As the story progressed I found myself not believing any of it. Finally there are several unresolved threads at the end of the book. I enjoyed his short stor Well, this is fast paced and has plenty of action in it. However, I did not enjoy it at all. The dialect is so intrusive and often incomprehensible. I found myself skipping the dialogue. The sudden introduction of his wife's apparent infidelity seems out of character and draws my attention to the very poor portrayal of the women characters. As the story progressed I found myself not believing any of it. Finally there are several unresolved threads at the end of the book. I enjoyed his short story but won't be reading any more by this author.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    Continuing with this series book 2 continues with a criminal feud in the wilds of Scotland. There is enough interest generated to see where the mystery goes and to get questions answered. DCI Daley is a good character although a bit blind to anything concerning his wife despite it being plastered to his face! The ending is left open so the reader will need to jump into book 3 to see what happens next. I will continue with the series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Judith Walker

    Didn't want this book to end! Enjoyed getting into the story behind each character and loved the twists and turns towards the end. Great follow up to Whisky In Small Glasses. Really enjoyed reading it and looking forward to next publication by Denzil. Didn't want this book to end! Enjoyed getting into the story behind each character and loved the twists and turns towards the end. Great follow up to Whisky In Small Glasses. Really enjoyed reading it and looking forward to next publication by Denzil.

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