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Mokie and Bik Go to Sea

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Mokie and Bik live on a boat called Bullfrog. Now that their father has come home from the illy-ally-o, the twins are ready to take Bullfrog out to sea. First, though, they need to shipshape! Soon Mokie and Bik are saving a runaway boat, making friends with a scaredy-seal, and keeping track of a Waggles with A Lot to Learn. Life with the twins is always a rollicky frolickin Mokie and Bik live on a boat called Bullfrog. Now that their father has come home from the illy-ally-o, the twins are ready to take Bullfrog out to sea. First, though, they need to shipshape! Soon Mokie and Bik are saving a runaway boat, making friends with a scaredy-seal, and keeping track of a Waggles with A Lot to Learn. Life with the twins is always a rollicky frolicking adventure!


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Mokie and Bik live on a boat called Bullfrog. Now that their father has come home from the illy-ally-o, the twins are ready to take Bullfrog out to sea. First, though, they need to shipshape! Soon Mokie and Bik are saving a runaway boat, making friends with a scaredy-seal, and keeping track of a Waggles with A Lot to Learn. Life with the twins is always a rollicky frolickin Mokie and Bik live on a boat called Bullfrog. Now that their father has come home from the illy-ally-o, the twins are ready to take Bullfrog out to sea. First, though, they need to shipshape! Soon Mokie and Bik are saving a runaway boat, making friends with a scaredy-seal, and keeping track of a Waggles with A Lot to Learn. Life with the twins is always a rollicky frolicking adventure!

43 review for Mokie and Bik Go to Sea

  1. 5 out of 5

    Martyn

    I really enjoyed reading the the Mokie and Bik books with Emily. I loved the playful and poetic use of language and the art, and I also really enjoyed the characters. I want to live on the Bullfrog, have clams on the beach and sail the illy-ally-o.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    Fantastic and clever use of language. Ginger hisser has stuck in my lexicon. Best read out loud.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    Wendy Orr is a woman whose star has risen. Consider the evidence. Her book Nim’s Island becomes a big-budget film with Jodie Foster. Her book Mokie and Bik is widely hailed as hailable (widely). And what’s more she manages to wrangle up-and-coming Ezra Jack Keats Award winning illustrator Jonathan Bean into creating the pictures for the latter book. 2008 is now her year of sequels. With Nim at Sea providing fans with a prompt Nim follow-up, she’s also cast her Aussie eyes upon the Mokie and B Wendy Orr is a woman whose star has risen. Consider the evidence. Her book Nim’s Island becomes a big-budget film with Jodie Foster. Her book Mokie and Bik is widely hailed as hailable (widely). And what’s more she manages to wrangle up-and-coming Ezra Jack Keats Award winning illustrator Jonathan Bean into creating the pictures for the latter book. 2008 is now her year of sequels. With Nim at Sea providing fans with a prompt Nim follow-up, she’s also cast her Aussie eyes upon the Mokie and Bik world as well. Mokie and Bik Go to Sea isn’t going to shock the socks off of anyone who has had the pleasure of reading the original. It just has the same wonderful wordplay. The same free-flowing energy, upbeat characters, and mischievous shenanigans. Even if you somehow missed the first, this early chapter book makes for a brilliant bedtime readaloud. That is, if your tongue is truly up to the challenge. In true Pippi Longstocking fashion, Mokie and Bik’s father returned at the end of their last book to sail their boat the Bullfrog out upon the illy-ally-o. Their pets have increased from the faithful sheepdog Laddie and the turtle Slow to include a Newfoundland pup with the ever-so accurate name of Waggles. Getting everything shipshape in time for the illy-ally-o isn’t as easy as it looks, though, and before the twins know it they’re underfoot, overboard, rowboating with a whale, and accidentally on an unexpected boat ride all alone quicker than you can say “jiggly heap”. Sometimes language tastes good. It just does. It’s a delicious sensation to say out loud something like, “Waggles frogleaped off the log, across the beach, and down the wharf skid skad skedaddle after the big ginger hisser.” That’s Orr’s gift to us here. She gives us words we know and words we don’t know and just swirls them all together in the best possible series of combinations. Common words replace commoner words, and so we get a sentence like, “Mokie was still paddling and swallowing big mouthfuls of harbor.” And though I’ve a low spoonerism saturation point, I even liked that the twins’ mother drove a “botormike”. I just did. It’s funny that in a book as high-spirited and delightful as this that you never get the sense that the twins’ absent parents and distracted nanny have anything but the greatest affection for their twins. They’re always busy, but I’m sure that that’s how parents feel to a lot of kids. Constantly involved in other activities and only offering a swipe here and there at the children when they’ve gotten a touch too much underfoot. Again, it’s much with the same and I’m sure you could bottle Mokie and Bik and its sequel together and neither would be the worse for wear. For those of you desperate for delightful early chapter books, Orr’s pair is fun from tail to tip. A great book to give to anyone that claims that language is never used to charm and delight in children’s books anymore. Or to give to anyone, really. Ages 5-9.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    The art was my favorite thing about Mokie & Bik—it was crisp and fleshed out. In this book, the art (some of which you can see on Jonathan Bean's website) is in pencil rather than pen, and it's sketchy, looser. Sometimes this works for me—I love the opening spread, with the looming hulls of ships and the twins' neighbor, Erik, and his fishing boat and his cat—but sometimes it just feels unfinished. Bean does still admirably capture the motion of the twins and their surroundings: landing seabirds The art was my favorite thing about Mokie & Bik—it was crisp and fleshed out. In this book, the art (some of which you can see on Jonathan Bean's website) is in pencil rather than pen, and it's sketchy, looser. Sometimes this works for me—I love the opening spread, with the looming hulls of ships and the twins' neighbor, Erik, and his fishing boat and his cat—but sometimes it just feels unfinished. Bean does still admirably capture the motion of the twins and their surroundings: landing seabirds, lapping waves, leapfrogging kids, a running puppy. And I do quite like the softness in this image: the water and the smoke and the moon and the foliage at the left. As with the last book, the text was secondary for me, though I did find it funnier and more charming in this one, with passages like this, when Mokie and Bik's puppy falls overboard: Waggles had black curly hair and big black paddly paws to help him swim. When he grew up he was going to be a swimming, rescuing Newfoundland dog. But right now he was a soggy shaggy round black waggles, and he knew how to swim but he didn't know which way to go. (8-9) Or this whole page, when Bik and Mokie are playing at getting Bullfrog ready to go to sea. And it's fun to read about Mokie and Bik's adventures, which include (unintentionally) taking Bullfrog to the fuel barge at the edge of the harbor by themselves, and fun for me to remember nautical vocabulary I haven't thought about in years (like the spring line: that's the rope holding the middle of the boat to the dock). Waggles the puppy and Laddie the dog kind of steal the show sometimes, and are totally great: there's one drawing of a sheepish-looking Waggles holding a bumper (which is supposed to be hanging from the boat's side/keeping it from bashing against the dock) that just slays me with its cuteness, and another of Laddie with Slow, the pet "tortle," that's also ridiculously sweet. I was going to give this two stars, but I bumped it up one for the dogs.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carissa

    I remember when I first saw this book wondering where in the heck it should go in the library. It's got lots of pictures and pretty big typeface, so it appears to be a good fit for our early chapter book collection (where it currently resides) but the language is so... creatively unique and lyrical that i thought it would present a significant challenge to the beginning readers who choose books from that shelf. well, i think I've found this book's true purpose--read-alouds to young listeners! We I remember when I first saw this book wondering where in the heck it should go in the library. It's got lots of pictures and pretty big typeface, so it appears to be a good fit for our early chapter book collection (where it currently resides) but the language is so... creatively unique and lyrical that i thought it would present a significant challenge to the beginning readers who choose books from that shelf. well, i think I've found this book's true purpose--read-alouds to young listeners! We could read this book several times and still probably not get tired of the words. Here's a sample: "Waggles [the dog] scrabble waggle scrabbled. The water swished over the slippy wet deck, swoshed over Mokie's and Bik's soggy socks--and then Waggles skiddled out of the bucket, across the deck and --splash!--into the sea." Can you just SEE that wet dog slipping all over the wet boat deck, trying to gain purchase with his nails and utterly failing? Love it!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erin Reilly-Sanders

    The story itself seemed to be okay with the novel setting of a houseboat and some adventures on the water but I found the humourous calling of things by different names confusing rather than funny. The language seems like it should be very fun- "wibble wabbled" and "rolicked" sniff wiffing the stinky salty brine- but in a setting with a lot of unfamiliar nautical vocabulary, it's difficult to tell what is made up and what is real. It might be better as a read aloud than silent reading, as I thin The story itself seemed to be okay with the novel setting of a houseboat and some adventures on the water but I found the humourous calling of things by different names confusing rather than funny. The language seems like it should be very fun- "wibble wabbled" and "rolicked" sniff wiffing the stinky salty brine- but in a setting with a lot of unfamiliar nautical vocabulary, it's difficult to tell what is made up and what is real. It might be better as a read aloud than silent reading, as I think it would make more sense.

  7. 5 out of 5

    R

    LOVE IT! It has a very Roald Dahl feel with wonderful illustrations on most pages. We didn't want it to end! Lots of good seafaring words to learn and words that aren't really words but fun to read and say! Now we need to read the other one she has written! LOVE IT! It has a very Roald Dahl feel with wonderful illustrations on most pages. We didn't want it to end! Lots of good seafaring words to learn and words that aren't really words but fun to read and say! Now we need to read the other one she has written!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Contessa

    I read this with my kids...not my favorite and hard to read aloud because the author changes everyday words to make them silly...however that is why the kids loved it! Short chapters and a good book for a strong young reader.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Beth Vredenburg

    Poetic use of language is refreshing in this book- a little like the salty sea air on the deck of the Bullfrog, the family boat. Great book for someone looking beyond easy readers and very early chapter books. Love the illustrations by Jonathan Bean!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Donalyn

    Bik and Mokie live on a boat with their parents and have rolicking adventures "overboard" and "underfoot". Invented words (brooped, botormike), alliteration (barnacle bells),repetition (row-row-rowboat) and other stylistic language make this a fun book to read aloud with young children. Bik and Mokie live on a boat with their parents and have rolicking adventures "overboard" and "underfoot". Invented words (brooped, botormike), alliteration (barnacle bells),repetition (row-row-rowboat) and other stylistic language make this a fun book to read aloud with young children.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Danette

    Read with my children at lunch time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    Lots of fun but I found the language just a bit too crazy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Waller

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kelleysgirl

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wesley

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  18. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne Hsu Feldman

  19. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Margarete Gillette

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tara

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rebs

  23. 4 out of 5

    Calvin West

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lily

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sophia Goodliffe

  27. 4 out of 5

    Walter

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hillvan

    810L

  30. 4 out of 5

    GraceAnne

  31. 5 out of 5

    Katy

  32. 5 out of 5

    Geri

  33. 4 out of 5

    Nickey

  34. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  35. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  36. 4 out of 5

    Christia

  37. 5 out of 5

    Neveen

  38. 5 out of 5

    K. L.

  39. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

  40. 4 out of 5

    Aleena Kluka

  41. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

  42. 4 out of 5

    K.h.m

  43. 5 out of 5

    Jayden

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