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Fairies, Fractions Women, and the Old Faith: Fairy Lore in Early Modern British Drama and Culture

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Fairies, unruly women, and vestigial Catholicism constituted a frequently invoked triad in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century drama which has seldom been critically examined and therefore constitutes a significant lacuna in scholarly treatments of early modern theater, including the work of Shakespeare. Fairy tradition has lost out in scholarly critical conventi Fairies, unruly women, and vestigial Catholicism constituted a frequently invoked triad in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century drama which has seldom been critically examined and therefore constitutes a significant lacuna in scholarly treatments of early modern theater, including the work of Shakespeare. Fairy tradition has lost out in scholarly critical convention to the more masculine mythologies of Christianity and classical Greece and Rome, in which female deities either serve masculine gods or are themselves masculinized (i.e., Diana as a buckskinned warrior). However, the fairy tradition is every bit as significant in our critical attempts to situate early modern texts in their historical contexts as the references to classical texts and struggles associated with state-mandated religious beliefs are widely agreed to be. fairy, rebellious woman, quasi-Catholic trio repeatedly stages resistance to early modern conceptions of appropriate class and gender conduct and state-mandated religion in A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Cymbeline, All's Well That Ends Well, and Ben Jonson's The Alchemist.


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Fairies, unruly women, and vestigial Catholicism constituted a frequently invoked triad in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century drama which has seldom been critically examined and therefore constitutes a significant lacuna in scholarly treatments of early modern theater, including the work of Shakespeare. Fairy tradition has lost out in scholarly critical conventi Fairies, unruly women, and vestigial Catholicism constituted a frequently invoked triad in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century drama which has seldom been critically examined and therefore constitutes a significant lacuna in scholarly treatments of early modern theater, including the work of Shakespeare. Fairy tradition has lost out in scholarly critical convention to the more masculine mythologies of Christianity and classical Greece and Rome, in which female deities either serve masculine gods or are themselves masculinized (i.e., Diana as a buckskinned warrior). However, the fairy tradition is every bit as significant in our critical attempts to situate early modern texts in their historical contexts as the references to classical texts and struggles associated with state-mandated religious beliefs are widely agreed to be. fairy, rebellious woman, quasi-Catholic trio repeatedly stages resistance to early modern conceptions of appropriate class and gender conduct and state-mandated religion in A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Cymbeline, All's Well That Ends Well, and Ben Jonson's The Alchemist.

26 review for Fairies, Fractions Women, and the Old Faith: Fairy Lore in Early Modern British Drama and Culture

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

    An alright book but would have preferred hearing about more than just Shakespeare.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Penny

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gary Colcombe

  5. 5 out of 5

    GaryandRuth

  6. 5 out of 5

    Pat Curran

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stunning Mess

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Norris

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  11. 4 out of 5

    Honey

  12. 4 out of 5

    jreads

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nat

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kaavariel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sapphire

  16. 5 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ariya S

  18. 5 out of 5

    Annie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rhea Rodriguez

  20. 4 out of 5

    Circe

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tomás

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gillian Lang

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Krzysiek (Chris)

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