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Reading Picture Books With Children: How to Shake Up Storytime and Get Kids Talking about What They See

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A new, interactive approach to storytime, The Whole Book Approach was developed in conjunction with the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and expert author Megan Dowd Lambert's graduate work in children's literature at Simmons College, offering a practical guide for reshaping storytime and getting kids to think with their eyes.   Traditional storytime often offers a pass A new, interactive approach to storytime, The Whole Book Approach was developed in conjunction with the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and expert author Megan Dowd Lambert's graduate work in children's literature at Simmons College, offering a practical guide for reshaping storytime and getting kids to think with their eyes.   Traditional storytime often offers a passive experience for kids, but the Whole Book approach asks the youngest of readers to ponder all aspects of a picture book and to use their critical thinking skills. Using classic examples, Megan asks kids to think about why the trim size of Ludwig Bemelman's Madeline is so generous, or why the typeset in David Wiesner's Caldecott winner,The Three Pigs, appears to twist around the page, or why books like Chris Van Allsburg's The Polar Express and Eric Carle's The Very Hungry Caterpillar are printed landscape instead of portrait. The dynamic discussions that result from this shared reading style range from the profound to the hilarious and will inspire adults to make children's responses to text, art, and design an essential part of storytime.


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A new, interactive approach to storytime, The Whole Book Approach was developed in conjunction with the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and expert author Megan Dowd Lambert's graduate work in children's literature at Simmons College, offering a practical guide for reshaping storytime and getting kids to think with their eyes.   Traditional storytime often offers a pass A new, interactive approach to storytime, The Whole Book Approach was developed in conjunction with the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and expert author Megan Dowd Lambert's graduate work in children's literature at Simmons College, offering a practical guide for reshaping storytime and getting kids to think with their eyes.   Traditional storytime often offers a passive experience for kids, but the Whole Book approach asks the youngest of readers to ponder all aspects of a picture book and to use their critical thinking skills. Using classic examples, Megan asks kids to think about why the trim size of Ludwig Bemelman's Madeline is so generous, or why the typeset in David Wiesner's Caldecott winner,The Three Pigs, appears to twist around the page, or why books like Chris Van Allsburg's The Polar Express and Eric Carle's The Very Hungry Caterpillar are printed landscape instead of portrait. The dynamic discussions that result from this shared reading style range from the profound to the hilarious and will inspire adults to make children's responses to text, art, and design an essential part of storytime.

30 review for Reading Picture Books With Children: How to Shake Up Storytime and Get Kids Talking about What They See

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    As a how-to book it's pure dead brill. For anyone who finds themselves about to read aloud to one or more children, it's a great introduction to how to do it, but also in what the long-term, big-picture goals are. Well researched, systematic, orderly, but really setting the reader up to be the best at storytime. Plus, there is practical tips on how to redirect the child who hijacks the conversation, which is probably super helpful for many. Plus, the idea of making it fun really comes down to maxi As a how-to book it's pure dead brill. For anyone who finds themselves about to read aloud to one or more children, it's a great introduction to how to do it, but also in what the long-term, big-picture goals are. Well researched, systematic, orderly, but really setting the reader up to be the best at storytime. Plus, there is practical tips on how to redirect the child who hijacks the conversation, which is probably super helpful for many. Plus, the idea of making it fun really comes down to maximum engagement: it's not just about the reading, it's the talking and thinking about it that make such a huge difference. Not everyone realizes that children have fascinating ideas and are crazy eager for someone to ask them real questions and listen. Good book, and a quick read. If you have storytime tomorrow you'd have time to read this, ponder it and make decisions accordingly. Library copy, of course.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ☼Book her, Danno☼

    I love reading and I love reading *with* children so this book was a natural choice for me. While reading it I found both things that were familiar and things that were not. I've shared wordless books with children, specifically to draw them out and get them to tell me the story. And I've gone over the parts of the book on a mega-level. Which is to say that I've pointed out the elements of the title page, the page numbers, table of contents and index and that sort of thing. What I never thought t I love reading and I love reading *with* children so this book was a natural choice for me. While reading it I found both things that were familiar and things that were not. I've shared wordless books with children, specifically to draw them out and get them to tell me the story. And I've gone over the parts of the book on a mega-level. Which is to say that I've pointed out the elements of the title page, the page numbers, table of contents and index and that sort of thing. What I never thought to discuss though was the layout of a book. Things like the guttering and why the shape of the book, the color pallate and even the font might have been chosen. So Megan Lambert opened up a whole new jungle of ideas that could be shared. As well as new ways that I could 'step back' and let children use their own imaginations so that we could have new kinds of discussions. ~ I really enjoyed this book and will revisit it as I begin to more fully utilize the author's suggestions, but I should warn you up front that the author is an evangelist for this approach to books and you need to brace yourself not to put off by her marginalizing of 'the old way' of sharing books. When she says that she's put off by those who succumb 'to a descent into some fuzzy platitudes about the magic of reading' I know there are going to be some of you who are put off. But I hope you aren't for long. I think there are some really good ideas in this book. Not just for moms/dads and teachers reading to early elementary aged children, but for art teachers and English teachers to share with older children and young adults. Analyzing how media effects us is an important part of understanding how we are being manipulated. And the challenge of converting what we understand on a gut level into words so that others can grasp what we are saying has great benefits. I think of Lambert's approach as being an extension of McLuhan's (medium is the message) and Korzybski's (the map is not the territory) work on media and communication. And I think this book holds some great clues on how to share these concepts with very young children. As well as some hints to aid us to step back to let children observe, organize their thoughts, and find their own voice. ~review copy ~book #11 for 2016

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eija

    Not all professional books about reading and reading with children are easy to read. Much to the theme of the book, this book feels more like a conversation than a professional lecture. Previously, there were times in my storytime where I ask kids about what they think might happen next based on the picture and other interactive questions -- but after or really during reading this I began to slow down more and try to point out specific design and illustration choices and ask kids questions-- let Not all professional books about reading and reading with children are easy to read. Much to the theme of the book, this book feels more like a conversation than a professional lecture. Previously, there were times in my storytime where I ask kids about what they think might happen next based on the picture and other interactive questions -- but after or really during reading this I began to slow down more and try to point out specific design and illustration choices and ask kids questions-- let them have room to speak. I'm still working on how to be more of a facilitator and less pointing out what I think they should notice, if that makes sense. I have noticed that some of my more unruly kids are more engaged. I've noticed that a 30 minute storytime can easily become a 45 minute+ storytime BUT and here's the crazy part. A room of 20 preschoolers will be okay at an extended storytime in this way because they're engaged in the process and participating. That's my feedback so far, I'm sure it will change and morph as i try to share books in this way. Some teachers remind kids not to interrupt the story or to be quiet, so it will be a bit of a learning process in moving to more of a conversation. For the kids and teachers/parents both. I also haven't had a group larger than 20 yet, so we'll see how it goes in a bigger group.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kris Patrick

    Six stars please! Reading aloud can absolutely be an inquiry based learning experience. Need to find the right wording ... possible upper arm tattoo? Hmmm...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn Patterson

    A lot of this content could be used with graphic novels, too. Started using some of these strategies in stories already.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chance Lee

    Seriously every adult who reads picture books needs to read this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Penelope

    Aspects I liked about this book: -Lambert spends time discussing aspects of art, text, subject, and layout of picture books and ways to engage children in story time. -The book is laid out like a picture book, with illustrations, glossy pages, and easy to read text. These design elements draw the reader into the book, and complement its topic. Aspects I really didn't like about the book: -Lambert has created a new vs. old paradigm of picture book reading that is very exaggerated. She implies that n Aspects I liked about this book: -Lambert spends time discussing aspects of art, text, subject, and layout of picture books and ways to engage children in story time. -The book is laid out like a picture book, with illustrations, glossy pages, and easy to read text. These design elements draw the reader into the book, and complement its topic. Aspects I really didn't like about the book: -Lambert has created a new vs. old paradigm of picture book reading that is very exaggerated. She implies that no one spends time discussing art and picture books with children while reading, and her tone can be condescending throughout the book. -Much like her condescending tone, she has an aside about a undergrad student who wrote a horrible paper about a picture book. The story, and a few other stories in the book, actually detract from Lambert is trying to communicate, and contribute to the condescending tone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Niki Marion

    Required reading for anyone who reads picturebooks with children and those who read picturebooks with themselves, too. An incredible resource for teachers, librarians, and booksellers to reinvigorate how they see picturebooks and those books' intended audiences. Lambert focuses on how to encourage the child reader to share their thoughts by providing them with a toolkit about how to look at and think about a picturebook as a whole art object, from cover to cover and everything in between. She als Required reading for anyone who reads picturebooks with children and those who read picturebooks with themselves, too. An incredible resource for teachers, librarians, and booksellers to reinvigorate how they see picturebooks and those books' intended audiences. Lambert focuses on how to encourage the child reader to share their thoughts by providing them with a toolkit about how to look at and think about a picturebook as a whole art object, from cover to cover and everything in between. She also quotes Ms. Frizzle. C'mon. Too good.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    I'm on the fence. I love the concept of making storytime less of a performance and more of a conversation/joint exploration. And I *really* love focusing on building and nurturing a relationship between kids and books, not to earn points or take tests but to have fun. Anyone who knows me knows exactly how I feel about AR (spoiler: it's the literal worst). I guess I'm just not sure that talking to preschoolers about endpapers is the way I want to go. I mostly do toddler storytimes so I'm also not I'm on the fence. I love the concept of making storytime less of a performance and more of a conversation/joint exploration. And I *really* love focusing on building and nurturing a relationship between kids and books, not to earn points or take tests but to have fun. Anyone who knows me knows exactly how I feel about AR (spoiler: it's the literal worst). I guess I'm just not sure that talking to preschoolers about endpapers is the way I want to go. I mostly do toddler storytimes so I'm also not sure how some of these concepts translate to that audience. But I'm open to trying. The practical tips at the end, including sample questions and the tips about keeping conversations on track, were helpful. Would like to learn more of these concrete ideas, but applied to a lapsit/toddler setting.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Georgene

    This book is a quick read with many surprises about reading picture books with children and teaching them about the parts of the book that interact with the illustrations to help tell the story on a child's level. Adults readers may be more engaged in reading the text and not giving the illustrations as much attention, but young listeners are more engrossed in the illustrations and will often see things that surprise the adults. Anyone who reads to children should read this book. This book is a quick read with many surprises about reading picture books with children and teaching them about the parts of the book that interact with the illustrations to help tell the story on a child's level. Adults readers may be more engaged in reading the text and not giving the illustrations as much attention, but young listeners are more engrossed in the illustrations and will often see things that surprise the adults. Anyone who reads to children should read this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emily Cornell

    Lots of good information to think about when interacting with children and stories. A large part of the book is specialized (i.e. being able to have an hour long discussion all about the images, etc.) which isn't translatable to toddler time at a public library, since we generally have only 5-10 minutes for a story. However, the comments and positive affirmation and fun exploration within observing the book as a whole art object--that's all going to be what I think about consciously implementing Lots of good information to think about when interacting with children and stories. A large part of the book is specialized (i.e. being able to have an hour long discussion all about the images, etc.) which isn't translatable to toddler time at a public library, since we generally have only 5-10 minutes for a story. However, the comments and positive affirmation and fun exploration within observing the book as a whole art object--that's all going to be what I think about consciously implementing more of. Overall, great for pushing you to be more purposeful with sharing stories! This book would be wonderful for parents who want to expand storytime at home!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    Lambert’s Whole Book Approach to Picture Book Story Times with children is both a revelation for and a confirmation of what I do with my Story Times at the library. Children need to be guided to develop visual interpretive skills. The illustrations, book design, end papers, book jacket, page layout and font all contribute to the story, hand in hand with the text. I will slow down, be more deliberate in my approach and ask more questions. This is the perfect melding of two things I love whole hea Lambert’s Whole Book Approach to Picture Book Story Times with children is both a revelation for and a confirmation of what I do with my Story Times at the library. Children need to be guided to develop visual interpretive skills. The illustrations, book design, end papers, book jacket, page layout and font all contribute to the story, hand in hand with the text. I will slow down, be more deliberate in my approach and ask more questions. This is the perfect melding of two things I love whole heartedly—visual design (art) and literature. A lovely book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Could also have been titled, "A Love Letter to Picture Books" or "Everything You Didn't Know You Didn't Know about Picture Books." I have mixed feelings about this one. It had some great information, and I have already started reading with my children differently. We take time to notice the front and back cover, the flaps, the endpapers, and the size or design of the fonts. We ask more questions based on these things and make predictions. We don't flip the pages quite so fast, taking the time to Could also have been titled, "A Love Letter to Picture Books" or "Everything You Didn't Know You Didn't Know about Picture Books." I have mixed feelings about this one. It had some great information, and I have already started reading with my children differently. We take time to notice the front and back cover, the flaps, the endpapers, and the size or design of the fonts. We ask more questions based on these things and make predictions. We don't flip the pages quite so fast, taking the time to pay attention to the illustrations. In these ways, I found value in the book. I struggled with the tone of the book, however. Not only did it read like a graduate degree dissertation, there was just something about it that came across...hmm... Holier than thou? Prideful? Not really sure what word or phrase quite pins it down, but I had to push through my discomfort with her tone to make it through the book. BUT, I learned a lot that I didn't know before (verso and recto pages, simultaneous succession or continuous narrative, intertextual reading, knockout type, and much more).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    I appreciated this read much more than Supercharged Storytime. This offers realistic instead of overwhelming teaching methods in a way that makes them not seem like teaching methods but just an insightful way to share a picture book. I'm someone who's still wary of so many questions interrupting the flow of the story, but I'm going to challenge myself to add more questioning to my storytime approach and just see how it goes. I appreciated this read much more than Supercharged Storytime. This offers realistic instead of overwhelming teaching methods in a way that makes them not seem like teaching methods but just an insightful way to share a picture book. I'm someone who's still wary of so many questions interrupting the flow of the story, but I'm going to challenge myself to add more questioning to my storytime approach and just see how it goes.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    This book opened my mind to a new way of thinking about sharing picture books with children. While I have problems getting this to work in my storytime it certainly has caused me to call attention to the art work and to remember to value the comments and ideas of children.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    All my librarian friends should read this book. I learned a lot!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Scott Fillner

    Wonderful book with exact vocabulary to use with students. It is a great book to utilize if you partake in #bookaday or #classroombookaday

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I'm going to have to reread this at least a couple more times to really get the most out of it. I love the idea of the Whole Book Approach - it seems so natural. I think it can easily become second nature with a little more exposure. Obviously not every reading of every picture book is going to provide an hour long discussion of the art, but the whole idea is just a beautiful one to help children with visual literacy and engage visual learners in story time. A few of my favorite quotes: "Books, l I'm going to have to reread this at least a couple more times to really get the most out of it. I love the idea of the Whole Book Approach - it seems so natural. I think it can easily become second nature with a little more exposure. Obviously not every reading of every picture book is going to provide an hour long discussion of the art, but the whole idea is just a beautiful one to help children with visual literacy and engage visual learners in story time. A few of my favorite quotes: "Books, like stuffed animals, are things. They're very thingy. They have a size and a shape. They are more or less shiny, soft or hard, smooth or rough. The paper within them is glossy or matte, brilliant or warm, exciting or comforting." p. v "Learning is best when it comes with a personality, whether that personality is in the line of a brush, the smile of a teacher, or the question of a child." p. vi [both these are technically from Chris Raschka's forward] "I didn't realize how very much I was missing until one day when I slowed down enough to let a child expand upon this observation" p. 27 "Just as children need to develop print awareness and other skills to be able to decode text and achieve fluency in their reading of words, learning to read pictures is a skill that develops over time and exposure." p. 71 "I've found that interactivity is the best way to prevent feeling as if one's role as story time leader is tantamount to crowd control; instead, interactivity asserts the reader as a facilitator of the group's shared experience." p. 99 As a children's librarian, I would much rather be a facilitator than provide merely crowd control! This book will give you a lot to think about and I highly recommend it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Makayla

    I picked up this book in hopes that it might give me some insight on leading my 'Book Babies' story time, where I am a tad uncomfortable. While I found the information in here to be extremely helpful and inspiring on how to really get children involved in story time, picture books and reading, I did not find it as life-changing as I hoped since my 'babies' are quite younger than the targeted audience, and I would not be able to engage in conversation with them. However, it has opened my eyes to I picked up this book in hopes that it might give me some insight on leading my 'Book Babies' story time, where I am a tad uncomfortable. While I found the information in here to be extremely helpful and inspiring on how to really get children involved in story time, picture books and reading, I did not find it as life-changing as I hoped since my 'babies' are quite younger than the targeted audience, and I would not be able to engage in conversation with them. However, it has opened my eyes to the true beauty of picture books in a way that I hadn't thought about them before. And, considering that the imagery and design is just as important as the text, I will do my best to slow down and not make so story time so much about finishing the book as about appreciating the beauty of the story altogether with the whole book approach.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Niki

    Reading Picture Books with Children is a fantastic resource for early year educators, teacher-librarians, and other library staff. Dowd Lambert explains various book terms and how to entice young readers to respond to the illustrations in deep and meaningful ways through what she has termed the Whole Book Approach. Years ago I had the pleasure of listening to a book designer speak at a Winnipeg Children's Literature Roundtable event for picture book illustrations and it was my first glimpse into Reading Picture Books with Children is a fantastic resource for early year educators, teacher-librarians, and other library staff. Dowd Lambert explains various book terms and how to entice young readers to respond to the illustrations in deep and meaningful ways through what she has termed the Whole Book Approach. Years ago I had the pleasure of listening to a book designer speak at a Winnipeg Children's Literature Roundtable event for picture book illustrations and it was my first glimpse into the many careful and deliberate choices that are made in all aspects of a picture book. Reading Picture Books with Children was an extension of that learning and I am so excited to put it into practice in the new year with my Mock Caldecott projects. (Shout out to my friend, Georgette, for the recommendation!)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    This was an intriguing read. Often time we thing story time should be a quiet time where children listen to the story and gaze at the pictures at the speed the reader (adult) chooses to go. I've been that adult, especially trying to speed through at a Scholastic Book Fair Preview time or trying to get to a certain point in a picture book before I get the kiddos checked out and lined up. However, whenever time permits I try to use the suggested questions presented in this book. I try to make ever This was an intriguing read. Often time we thing story time should be a quiet time where children listen to the story and gaze at the pictures at the speed the reader (adult) chooses to go. I've been that adult, especially trying to speed through at a Scholastic Book Fair Preview time or trying to get to a certain point in a picture book before I get the kiddos checked out and lined up. However, whenever time permits I try to use the suggested questions presented in this book. I try to make everything about the book an inquiry- and this book just showed even more areas in which I can improve. Story time should be about letting the children read the book with you- make observations, ask questions, predict, etc. This book goes over the great way to make reading time an inquiry time with picture books.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Miss Shelley

    A really great way to practice reading pictures as well as words when reading aloud with children. This will work really well in small groups or 1 to 1 sharing. Tips: model the words for trim size, orientation, endpapers, covers, etc. Give a direction: This white space is an air frame. Watch it and tell me what you see. Try reading against typography and see how they reaction (whisper the big letters, etc) Validate and redirect back to the pictures/book when kids start making connections to their A really great way to practice reading pictures as well as words when reading aloud with children. This will work really well in small groups or 1 to 1 sharing. Tips: model the words for trim size, orientation, endpapers, covers, etc. Give a direction: This white space is an air frame. Watch it and tell me what you see. Try reading against typography and see how they reaction (whisper the big letters, etc) Validate and redirect back to the pictures/book when kids start making connections to their own lives (I HAVE A GRANDMA!!!) "I think we're ready to turn the page. 1...2...3....turn!" Why do you think this book is so tall? So wide? What do you see that makes you think that? Endpapers can give clues about the story. What clues do you see?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bkrieth

    This title was recommended in a session at nErDcamp MI-thank you to Deborah Freedman for the suggestion. Lambert is a former staff member at the Eric Carle Museum of Art and a lecturer at Simmons College. Her Whole Book Approach is powerful study for educators, librarians, and caregivers looking to develop children's visual literacy skills using the infinite possibiities of picture books. Lambert's goal is to explore and expand the way children interact with these texts by guiding them into meta This title was recommended in a session at nErDcamp MI-thank you to Deborah Freedman for the suggestion. Lambert is a former staff member at the Eric Carle Museum of Art and a lecturer at Simmons College. Her Whole Book Approach is powerful study for educators, librarians, and caregivers looking to develop children's visual literacy skills using the infinite possibiities of picture books. Lambert's goal is to explore and expand the way children interact with these texts by guiding them into metacognitive conversations while examining how text, art, and paratext (covers, endpapers, placement, gutters, etc.) interact. I highly recommend this thought-provoking book to anyone who spends time reading picture books with children.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Desiree Sotomayor

    This has been my "slow time on desk" reading for a while now, part of why it's taken me a bit to finish...all that said, as I've made my way through it, I have shifted some parts of my philosophy on storytime (while others were completely validated by reading this). I've noticed so many more ideas & deeper conversations while reading with the kids too! For a book on storytime, the writing is super accessible -- not too much jargon or ideas that look great on paper, but not quite so much when you This has been my "slow time on desk" reading for a while now, part of why it's taken me a bit to finish...all that said, as I've made my way through it, I have shifted some parts of my philosophy on storytime (while others were completely validated by reading this). I've noticed so many more ideas & deeper conversations while reading with the kids too! For a book on storytime, the writing is super accessible -- not too much jargon or ideas that look great on paper, but not quite so much when you are actually sitting down with a group of 2-4 year olds. Definitely lives up to all of its praise.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brandy

    A useful approach to storytimes, but--contrary to the premise--certainly not the only way. It's a way of running storytime as an interactive discussion of art and books (which is great and valuable) rather than as a performance (which is also valuable in different ways). Good information and technique for presenting picture books, complete with the proper lingo to discuss it, but wrapped in a slightly off-putting This Is The True Way package. Thinking on some of the ideas for an upcoming class, A useful approach to storytimes, but--contrary to the premise--certainly not the only way. It's a way of running storytime as an interactive discussion of art and books (which is great and valuable) rather than as a performance (which is also valuable in different ways). Good information and technique for presenting picture books, complete with the proper lingo to discuss it, but wrapped in a slightly off-putting This Is The True Way package. Thinking on some of the ideas for an upcoming class, though.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    This book brings some really great ideas to the table for storytimes with Lambert's Whole Book Approach. In general, I felt the text could have been more succinct as well as go into more depth for those attempting to incorporate this approach into storytimes. Strangely, I couldn't really see an audience for this book aside from other educators/librarians/etc who lead storytime and yet the book contained a lot of anecdotal evidence rather than instruction on how to become comfortable leading a gr This book brings some really great ideas to the table for storytimes with Lambert's Whole Book Approach. In general, I felt the text could have been more succinct as well as go into more depth for those attempting to incorporate this approach into storytimes. Strangely, I couldn't really see an audience for this book aside from other educators/librarians/etc who lead storytime and yet the book contained a lot of anecdotal evidence rather than instruction on how to become comfortable leading a group in this way.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    With a lot of workable suggestions, this book offers a basic guide to talking about the elements of a picture book. Some ideas were new to me, others were great reminders of concepts that I haven't consciously thought about in awhile. I wanted more detail on the groups she worked with: ages and sizes. Her narrative implied that her approach works with kids as young as two and with assembly-sized crowds, but I kept hoping for more thoughts on dealing with younger or larger audiences. I could easi With a lot of workable suggestions, this book offers a basic guide to talking about the elements of a picture book. Some ideas were new to me, others were great reminders of concepts that I haven't consciously thought about in awhile. I wanted more detail on the groups she worked with: ages and sizes. Her narrative implied that her approach works with kids as young as two and with assembly-sized crowds, but I kept hoping for more thoughts on dealing with younger or larger audiences. I could easily see translating her techniques to one-on-one interactions, or classroom reading.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    While some caregivers will find this approach too heavy-handed for everyday attention, others, and definitely preschool and elementary teachers will see its usefulness in fostering observation, risk-taking, detail-oriented description, and enjoyment of a picture book as a visual and narrative experience. The language is accessible to parents and caregivers, whether or not they have an education or art background. And the varied examples of picture books throughout the text will help homes and cl While some caregivers will find this approach too heavy-handed for everyday attention, others, and definitely preschool and elementary teachers will see its usefulness in fostering observation, risk-taking, detail-oriented description, and enjoyment of a picture book as a visual and narrative experience. The language is accessible to parents and caregivers, whether or not they have an education or art background. And the varied examples of picture books throughout the text will help homes and classrooms build their own libraries with rich and diverse stories. 

  29. 5 out of 5

    Payge Rustad

    This book was very influential on how I now look at children's books. They're more than just words and pictures on a page. They're an immersive work of art. Each time I pick up a picture book, I now take time to absorb each page individually, allowing myself to find the message the illustrators/authors are trying to convey. Highly recommend this book for a new librarian (like me), or someone looking to dive deeper into the world of picture books. This book was very influential on how I now look at children's books. They're more than just words and pictures on a page. They're an immersive work of art. Each time I pick up a picture book, I now take time to absorb each page individually, allowing myself to find the message the illustrators/authors are trying to convey. Highly recommend this book for a new librarian (like me), or someone looking to dive deeper into the world of picture books.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Wow, this was really interesting! Like maybe a lot of people who "love reading," I don't consider myself very visual and definitely tend to prioritize text over art. This book looks at a picture book as a unified work of art and encourages storytime providers to get kids talking about things like the gutter and the endpapers. I know I'll be looking art parts of picture books that I never thought of before! It'll help my storytimes, but I wish I had found it when my personal kids were smaller. Wow, this was really interesting! Like maybe a lot of people who "love reading," I don't consider myself very visual and definitely tend to prioritize text over art. This book looks at a picture book as a unified work of art and encourages storytime providers to get kids talking about things like the gutter and the endpapers. I know I'll be looking art parts of picture books that I never thought of before! It'll help my storytimes, but I wish I had found it when my personal kids were smaller.

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