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Hellboy, Vol. 8: Darkness Calls

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Hellboy has finally returned from his adventures at sea, but no sooner has he settled on land than a conclave of witches drags him from his respite and into the heart of Russian folklore, where he becomes the quarry of the powerful and bloodthirsty witch Baba Yaga. Bent on revenge for the eye she had lost to Hellboy, Baba Yaga has enlisted the aid of a deathless warrior wh Hellboy has finally returned from his adventures at sea, but no sooner has he settled on land than a conclave of witches drags him from his respite and into the heart of Russian folklore, where he becomes the quarry of the powerful and bloodthirsty witch Baba Yaga. Bent on revenge for the eye she had lost to Hellboy, Baba Yaga has enlisted the aid of a deathless warrior who will stop at nothing to destroy Hellboy. Since his creation in 1993, Mike Mignola's Hellboy has accumulated dozens of industry awards and become a favorite of fans and critics alike. Now, Mignola turns over drawing duties to Duncan Fegredo (Enigma, Ultimate Adventures) for a new chapter in the life of the World's Greatest Paranormal Investigator. * Collects the entire six-issue miniseries, along with two new epilogues--one drawn by Mignola, and one by Fegredo--and an extensive sketchbook section from both artists!


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Hellboy has finally returned from his adventures at sea, but no sooner has he settled on land than a conclave of witches drags him from his respite and into the heart of Russian folklore, where he becomes the quarry of the powerful and bloodthirsty witch Baba Yaga. Bent on revenge for the eye she had lost to Hellboy, Baba Yaga has enlisted the aid of a deathless warrior wh Hellboy has finally returned from his adventures at sea, but no sooner has he settled on land than a conclave of witches drags him from his respite and into the heart of Russian folklore, where he becomes the quarry of the powerful and bloodthirsty witch Baba Yaga. Bent on revenge for the eye she had lost to Hellboy, Baba Yaga has enlisted the aid of a deathless warrior who will stop at nothing to destroy Hellboy. Since his creation in 1993, Mike Mignola's Hellboy has accumulated dozens of industry awards and become a favorite of fans and critics alike. Now, Mignola turns over drawing duties to Duncan Fegredo (Enigma, Ultimate Adventures) for a new chapter in the life of the World's Greatest Paranormal Investigator. * Collects the entire six-issue miniseries, along with two new epilogues--one drawn by Mignola, and one by Fegredo--and an extensive sketchbook section from both artists!

30 review for Hellboy, Vol. 8: Darkness Calls

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Hellish good! This TPB edition collects “Hellboy” #27-32 featuring the storyline “Darkness Calls”. Creative Team: Writer: Mike Mignola Illustrator: Duncan Fegredo COLLECTING DEBTS How bad is it going to be? We will not survive it. Events happened in previous storylines such as Seed of Destruction, Wake the Devil, The Chained Coffin and Others and Box Full of Evil make a terrible crossroad here… …and Hellboy is right in the center of all of it. Great powers walking the Earth will collide c Hellish good! This TPB edition collects “Hellboy” #27-32 featuring the storyline “Darkness Calls”. Creative Team: Writer: Mike Mignola Illustrator: Duncan Fegredo COLLECTING DEBTS How bad is it going to be? We will not survive it. Events happened in previous storylines such as Seed of Destruction, Wake the Devil, The Chained Coffin and Others and Box Full of Evil make a terrible crossroad here… …and Hellboy is right in the center of all of it. Great powers walking the Earth will collide choosing sides in the fate of Hellboy. Some looking for his doom, others stepping out for protecting him. At this point, I’ll take all the friends I can get. And have no doubt that this battle will collect its toll in both sides of the paranormal conflict. Baba Yaga lost an eye due Hellboy, she’s back and you can be sure that she is pissed as hell (pun intented) and she won’t rest until getting that Hellboy would suffer the same and being as humiliated too. WICKED CROWN Who, then, has more right to be king? The witches of the world lost their queen. The position must be filled soon. Obviously, Baba Yaga wants it. However, the sources of Hellboy’s unholy breeding, makes him to look like as good candidate as any, if not more. A king for the witches? Some circles are considering the unusual scenario. Obviously, Hellboy doesn’t want it. That’s only more firewood for their messy clash. However, an insidious third party is moving around to find a better suited queen. Better suited for the witches’ community, not for us.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    In the dreamland of Baba Yaga, the immortal Russian Forest, Hellboy faces a ton of cool foes right from real mythology and legend. I can't say I completely recognize all the legend references here but that doesn't matter for the sake of sheer enjoyment. Indeed, the pacing on this one is pretty much nonstop action and twist with a really huge bite of Hellboy's old foes. We've got witches, Hood of the hanging fame, Hecate and an army of skeletons, the spirit of the forest, Baba Yaga... but honestly In the dreamland of Baba Yaga, the immortal Russian Forest, Hellboy faces a ton of cool foes right from real mythology and legend. I can't say I completely recognize all the legend references here but that doesn't matter for the sake of sheer enjoyment. Indeed, the pacing on this one is pretty much nonstop action and twist with a really huge bite of Hellboy's old foes. We've got witches, Hood of the hanging fame, Hecate and an army of skeletons, the spirit of the forest, Baba Yaga... but honestly, I was most thrilled by Koshchei the Deathless. The only other time I read about Koshchei the Deathless was in a Cat Valente novel and now I'm pretty stoked to learn a lot more, and not just because of how he was portrayed here. What a tragic piece!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This is one of my favorite volumes yet. Both the story with the witches of england and the confrontation with Baba Yaga is fantastic. I love how Mignola brings in Russian folklore and ties it all together into the book. Russian mythology is pretty batshit crazy in the first place. Baba Yaga has a house that runs around on chicken legs and she flies around in a giant mortar and pestle. It doesn't get much more insane than that. Duncan Fegredo takes over on art for the last 3 books of Hellboy's mai This is one of my favorite volumes yet. Both the story with the witches of england and the confrontation with Baba Yaga is fantastic. I love how Mignola brings in Russian folklore and ties it all together into the book. Russian mythology is pretty batshit crazy in the first place. Baba Yaga has a house that runs around on chicken legs and she flies around in a giant mortar and pestle. It doesn't get much more insane than that. Duncan Fegredo takes over on art for the last 3 books of Hellboy's main story. His art is probably technically better. It does pair well with Mignola's but his fight scenes don't have the same oomph and dynamics to them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    This isn't quite 5 stars, but it's a 5 star HELLBOY book...if that makes any sense... Again, Mignola puts aside the art for Duncan Fegredo, who manages to take Mignola's style and tweak it ever so much into something that captures the essence and feel of Hellboy nearly as well as Mignola himself. This is also a change, in that the whole volume contains one continuous story, not a pile of smaller ones. Hellboy has to deal with some pretty dangerous opponents returning from the Darkness: Hecate, Baba This isn't quite 5 stars, but it's a 5 star HELLBOY book...if that makes any sense... Again, Mignola puts aside the art for Duncan Fegredo, who manages to take Mignola's style and tweak it ever so much into something that captures the essence and feel of Hellboy nearly as well as Mignola himself. This is also a change, in that the whole volume contains one continuous story, not a pile of smaller ones. Hellboy has to deal with some pretty dangerous opponents returning from the Darkness: Hecate, Baba Yaga being the 2 biggies. We see here that he's a pawn in a larger game, and we see his lineage and parentage might include the Devil and a Witch, but his biggest actual battle is waged against the best opponent yet: Koshchei the Deathless...a valliant warrior once, who's soul belongs to Baba Yaga, who will never release him...she sics him on Hellboy, and promises death/eternal peace, but of course, he cannot trust her, nor can he afford not to fight and destroy Hellboy...this leads to a helluva throwdown between these 2 guys. There's a lot going on here, and it's plenty enjoyable to see Hellboy run into real foes and someone who he can't just blow up or punch out. He even gets thrown into a netherworld to fight, and is so fed up with it at one point: "STUPID GODDAMN SKELETON ARMY BASTARDS...!" Which is exactly what he has to face...a skeleton army of dead, only to be rescued by a gigantic Wolf, who represents the forest, and only enjoys the fact that Hellboy annoys Hecate... It's quite the spot he's thrown into, and for the first time in memory, he might not make it out...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    Darkness Calls is the first part of what basically is a three-part finale of Hellboy, and it is appropriately epic. This volume is heavy on Russian folklore, as it features Hellboy's fight against Baba Yaga and Koshchei the Deathless, and Vasilisa the Beautiful makes her first appearance in the Hellboy-verse. A friend of mine once told me the premise of this volume (long before I have read Hellboy myself), and I thought it was bonkers. What I didn't realise then is just how much fun such a story Darkness Calls is the first part of what basically is a three-part finale of Hellboy, and it is appropriately epic. This volume is heavy on Russian folklore, as it features Hellboy's fight against Baba Yaga and Koshchei the Deathless, and Vasilisa the Beautiful makes her first appearance in the Hellboy-verse. A friend of mine once told me the premise of this volume (long before I have read Hellboy myself), and I thought it was bonkers. What I didn't realise then is just how much fun such a story can be if it's executed well. Needless to say, Mike Mignola did exactly that in Darkness Calls. I never liked Russian fables when I was a kid, because I only knew them from bad soviet cartoons and adapted children's books that seemed dull even to a toddler. Mignola made me realise just how awesome and metal Russian folklore can be when it's in the hands of a talented writer. This volume is also the first one drawn by Duncan Fegredo instead of Mike Mignola himself. I wasn't a huge fan of Mignola's style the first time I was reading Hellboy, but on my second read I've actually grown to love it, so now I'm not as happy with the change. Don't get me wrong, Fegredo's style is incredible — it's very similar to Mignola's, but much more detailed and technical. Still, I really miss Mignola drawing Hellboy, there is just that special kind of charm and atmosphere that is impossible to replicate. Fegredo's art may look more impressive and professional, but Mignola's has heart and soul. First read: October 28, 2015 Rating: ★★★★★ Second read: October 12, 2017 Rating: ★★★★★

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    3.5 stars. Hellboy’s starts out in England, but ends up somewhere else, thanks to him ticking off some witches. Baba Yaga finds him, and sends a variety of forces after him so she can have her revenge on Hellboy for taking one of her eyes. Hellboy encounters various Russian spirits and gods this time. The artwork is frequently stunning, with brilliant oranges and reds. I found some parts of the story confusing, but I liked the basic premise of a pissed off Baba Yaga throwing everything she can a 3.5 stars. Hellboy’s starts out in England, but ends up somewhere else, thanks to him ticking off some witches. Baba Yaga finds him, and sends a variety of forces after him so she can have her revenge on Hellboy for taking one of her eyes. Hellboy encounters various Russian spirits and gods this time. The artwork is frequently stunning, with brilliant oranges and reds. I found some parts of the story confusing, but I liked the basic premise of a pissed off Baba Yaga throwing everything she can at Hellboy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I'm in love with the art of Duncan Fegredo. I think he's one of the few people that can replace Mike Mignola. He simultaneously matches the tone of Mignola and introduces his own unique style - unlike, say Guy Davis's work on B.P.R.D. which has very little similarity to Mignola. The story in this book is a little thin and it's a quick read. I won't go into any plot details but it includes a lot of Hellboy running around and meeting/battling interesting characters while trying to avoid a witch who I'm in love with the art of Duncan Fegredo. I think he's one of the few people that can replace Mike Mignola. He simultaneously matches the tone of Mignola and introduces his own unique style - unlike, say Guy Davis's work on B.P.R.D. which has very little similarity to Mignola. The story in this book is a little thin and it's a quick read. I won't go into any plot details but it includes a lot of Hellboy running around and meeting/battling interesting characters while trying to avoid a witch who wants to take his eyeball. Darkness Calls is a good entry in the Hellboy series but nothing game-changing. Every fan will obviously want to read this and its just another reason for new readers to go through all the Hellboy volumes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    Holy jeez! Super epic world building awesomeness! Man it's been a while we've had a large 6 issue Hellboy grand arc story, it's finally here and it's awesome. Let's just dive into this awesomeness: World: Mignola Art, done. Duncan Fregrado art is nice, he's quite good at mimicking Mignola, I just wish Mignola would draw more again. Absolute tour de force in world building. Oh man so much happens here in the grand scheme of things that I can't even list all of it. I won't spoil anything for you but Holy jeez! Super epic world building awesomeness! Man it's been a while we've had a large 6 issue Hellboy grand arc story, it's finally here and it's awesome. Let's just dive into this awesomeness: World: Mignola Art, done. Duncan Fregrado art is nice, he's quite good at mimicking Mignola, I just wish Mignola would draw more again. Absolute tour de force in world building. Oh man so much happens here in the grand scheme of things that I can't even list all of it. I won't spoil anything for you but wow, yeah its insane how many things are called back, put into motion and tied together. I love how the HB world which has been separate from the rest of the Mignolaverse is finally tying back with the BPRD. Insane awesomeness. Story: Grand is the word, epic is another. The Baba Yaga story and the World Tree has been in the back burner for a while, and man this return was well worth the wait. It's insane, the pacing great, the dialog superb. Wow the world building is amazing. I don't want to ruin anything once again so be prepared to get your mind to explode. Characters: HB still does not have a large chunk of development for a while and here there is, it's passive where he's not the person changing, the world around him is and preparing for something greater, I can't wait to see where this will go. Baba Yaga is amazing as is the witches story, yeah. Epic. And I'm trying to be spoiler free without shitting my pants. If you like monsters and giant fights and mythology, read this bloody book, it's amazing. It will make you shit yourself! Onward to the next book!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melissa McShane

    Re-read 8/6/15: Another excellent miniseries, this one focusing on Baba Yaga's vendetta against Hellboy because of her lost eye. The story takes place in a dreamland alternate Russia populated by Russian myth and folklore, and as Hellboy runs for his life, he's pursued by Koshchei the Deathless, probably my favorite "villain" of the Hellboy universe. (He's definitely not a good guy, but Baba Yaga is almost literally pulling his strings, and you can see that his sense of honor is tearing him apar Re-read 8/6/15: Another excellent miniseries, this one focusing on Baba Yaga's vendetta against Hellboy because of her lost eye. The story takes place in a dreamland alternate Russia populated by Russian myth and folklore, and as Hellboy runs for his life, he's pursued by Koshchei the Deathless, probably my favorite "villain" of the Hellboy universe. (He's definitely not a good guy, but Baba Yaga is almost literally pulling his strings, and you can see that his sense of honor is tearing him apart.) This one ties back in briefly to the B.P.R.D., which I found useful for keeping track of the parallel chronologies. Duncan Fegredo takes over the illustrating duties here, and his work is simply beautiful: this is still recognizably Hellboy, but with a unique twist. This book is battling for first place with Conqueror Worm in my heart. At this point I've come to the end of what I've read before, and am looking forward to seeing what comes next. Read, but not reviewed, 1/14/09.

  10. 5 out of 5

    William Thomas

    Mike Mignola awoke some very serious artistic sensibilities in my very young mind at the time that "Gotham by Gaslight" came out. He was doing something so different, so deceptively simple, and so dark, that I could barely understand it. Fast forward to some of his DHP work with the early Hellboy stories (like Jenny Greenteeth) and I couldn't stay away. I mean, I was still addicted to the likes of Lee and Silvestri around that time, but artists like Mignola and Allred were having a huge influenc Mike Mignola awoke some very serious artistic sensibilities in my very young mind at the time that "Gotham by Gaslight" came out. He was doing something so different, so deceptively simple, and so dark, that I could barely understand it. Fast forward to some of his DHP work with the early Hellboy stories (like Jenny Greenteeth) and I couldn't stay away. I mean, I was still addicted to the likes of Lee and Silvestri around that time, but artists like Mignola and Allred were having a huge influence on me and on my work. The lines could do so much when they were just barely even there. Deep shadows could speak volumes. I still to this day feel as if Miller gets more credit than he deserves for things Mignola does better. But, whatever. Mignola doesn't even touch the art chores in this volume. It's just someone who really wants to mimic his style. For whatever reason. Anyway, this is a solid volume. I stopped reading a lot of the Hellboy stuff probably around what I'm guessing would be volume 6 or so. No reason, really, just fell off it. The bookstore I work at now got some of these later trades in and I figured I'd take a look at the colorized stuff he was pumping out now. I wasn't disappointed. And I was damn glad to find only a mention of Rasputin here, but not the witch himself. Instead, we are treated to the fairy tales and legends of Russia from a time before the madman even lived. If you know anything about Hellboy, you know he goes about his business much the same way the Goon does- with brute force and little brains. It's one of the things that makes him endearing. One of the reasons the character worked so well surrounded by the BPRD cast. In Darkness Calls, the witchiest of witches calls our boy to another realm, that of Baba Yaga. It doesn't disappoint. The endless parade of Russian misfit legends is more interesting and intriguing than anything Hellboy himself says or does in this volume, and I don't mind that a single bit. As for the colorized art here... it works. It's serviceable. There isn't anything terrible, except maybe some of the more unfortunate choices of deep grays that obscure some of the inks. Otherwise, the bright, straightforward reds and oranges, the muted browns and the stark contrasts of the whites work wonders against masterful lines. Grade: B+

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adam M

    This is pretty standard Hellboy greatness. Please feel free to read what's going to happen if you haven't read the first 7 volumes... or you know, just pick it up and enjoy how great Mike Mignola is. At most things. This is pretty standard Hellboy greatness. Please feel free to read what's going to happen if you haven't read the first 7 volumes... or you know, just pick it up and enjoy how great Mike Mignola is. At most things.

  12. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    It wasn't until halfway through the first chapter that I suddenly thought 'hey, I thought Mignola was giving up art duties to concentrate fully on writing'. Yet the choppy line quality, intimidating mood, and bulky chiaroscuro of Mignola's style were all in full effect, despite the fact that they were the work of artist Duncan Fegredo. The art in this volume is lush, gorgeous, and full of detail, yet completely true to the classic Hellboy style. Somehow, Fegredo took in Mignola's characteristic a It wasn't until halfway through the first chapter that I suddenly thought 'hey, I thought Mignola was giving up art duties to concentrate fully on writing'. Yet the choppy line quality, intimidating mood, and bulky chiaroscuro of Mignola's style were all in full effect, despite the fact that they were the work of artist Duncan Fegredo. The art in this volume is lush, gorgeous, and full of detail, yet completely true to the classic Hellboy style. Somehow, Fegredo took in Mignola's characteristic art, refined it, and recreated it with the hand of a master draughtsman. Yet I have always been impressed with Fegredo's sense of form and gesture, which he demonstrated so effectively in Milligan's great conceptual work, Enigma, though I did not know he was such a studied mimic. I'm glad that Mignola decided to devote himself full-time to writing, having found an artist capable of keeping up the other end, because it has freed him up to write more in-depth, thoughtful stories without sacrificing his publishing schedule, and it also allows the dedicated artist to produce highly-detailed work. I am usually less fond of the main plotline stories in the Hellboy series, since I find the briefer, unconnected story collections to be more experimental and rich, concentrating on tone and character instead of steady plot movement. Yet in this volume, Mignola has managed to advance the plot at the same time as he explores subtler aspects of his world. His deep delving into Russian myth was interesting, since it is such a rich vein of unique stories and magics, and one rarely tapped by other authors. I'm glad that, like Gaiman, Mignola is not content to sit on his laurels, but keeps expanding his world and surprising us. My only complaint is the characterization of Hellboy himself, who has always been flippant and sardonic, but since the Strange Places TPB, has increasingly become a dullard and spewer of quips. As Mignola explained in the introduction to that collection, he had just come off of working on the Del Toro film, which influenced his concept of the character and the world. I find it extremely disappointing that the goofy, watered-down film version of Hellboy has ended up replacing the complex, conflicted character of the earlier comics. I'm glad that Mignola has moved on from the narrative exposition of Strange Places, but I hope the character will also soon escape the dulling effect of Del Toro's flashy, unsubtle film and return to what made the comic great.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I've come to love Hellboy, and how Mignola uses folklore as a starting point for his stories. I've also become a fan of Mignola's art on Hellboy, and his skillful use of black spaces. But this is not Mignola's art. This is Duncan Fegredo, and I was surprised by how much it works. Fegredo does a good job of making his art here stylistically consistent with Mignola's. And yet, he isn't just copying his style. His art has more detail, to name the most obvious difference. It has to be a difficult ti I've come to love Hellboy, and how Mignola uses folklore as a starting point for his stories. I've also become a fan of Mignola's art on Hellboy, and his skillful use of black spaces. But this is not Mignola's art. This is Duncan Fegredo, and I was surprised by how much it works. Fegredo does a good job of making his art here stylistically consistent with Mignola's. And yet, he isn't just copying his style. His art has more detail, to name the most obvious difference. It has to be a difficult tightrope act, to draw something similar enough to Mignola's Hellboy to be consistent with his work (and satisfying to fans!) while still making it your own. Fegredo nails it, and he deserves a ton of credit for pulling it off. That leaves the story entirely in Mignola's hand. This may be a good thing, in the long run, because what he delivers is one of the longest and most complex Hellboy stories to date. It brings the conflict between Hellboy and Baba Yaga to its conclusion, while setting up a new conflict. I'm very interested to see where the storyline with the witches is heading. It all builds very naturally from what came before, without the reader having to flip back to previous collections to understand what's going on. It's possible that a new reader could start out here, but I wouldn't suggest it. However, parts of the story did drag a bit. Koschei the Deathless just keeps showing up, and I could have used a bit less of him. Overall, though, one of the best single volumes of Hellboy so far.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    If you thought the Hellboy movies were good then you will love the comics. Much more story on the monsters and the history of hellboys origin. Great reads, Very recommended

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ren the Unclean

    I didn't like this quite as much as the collection of shorter stories that was the last trade. The story was somewhat unclear and muddled at times, and there is a lot of action that isn't supported super well by the art. This book is not drawn at all by Mignola (Duncan Fegredo takes over in the art department) and though it is very well done and emulates the Hellboy style expertly, Fegredo doesn't handle high action as well as Mignola and it sort of hurts the book. The fight scenes end up being I didn't like this quite as much as the collection of shorter stories that was the last trade. The story was somewhat unclear and muddled at times, and there is a lot of action that isn't supported super well by the art. This book is not drawn at all by Mignola (Duncan Fegredo takes over in the art department) and though it is very well done and emulates the Hellboy style expertly, Fegredo doesn't handle high action as well as Mignola and it sort of hurts the book. The fight scenes end up being chaotic and confusing, rather than having the sort of impact that Mignola usually manages. The story seems sort of hacked together as well. There is a lot of setup for Hellboy's next big challenge, but it is pretty obviously setup, with Hellboy rambling from one plot point to the next without much tying them together. This is a pretty good comic, but definitely not the best Hellboy has to offer.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    4 1/2 stars

  17. 5 out of 5

    Siona St Mark

    Actual rating: 4.5 I will say that the art in this volume was a bit confusing, but also really cool to look at. I like the new characters also.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Snook O'Neill

    A spectacular change of pace for the adventures of Hellboy. There are a lot of scenes with armies and crowds (like the congregation of witches and the attack of Baba Yaga's army) which largely explains why Mignola chose to have Duncan Fegrado draw this tale (and the next two), as his own style is perhaps a bit too minimalistic to really do those events justice. Duncan Fegredo's gorgeous artwork is a bit Mignola-esque but with much more attention to detail. This works tremendously well in the afo A spectacular change of pace for the adventures of Hellboy. There are a lot of scenes with armies and crowds (like the congregation of witches and the attack of Baba Yaga's army) which largely explains why Mignola chose to have Duncan Fegrado draw this tale (and the next two), as his own style is perhaps a bit too minimalistic to really do those events justice. Duncan Fegredo's gorgeous artwork is a bit Mignola-esque but with much more attention to detail. This works tremendously well in the aforementioned scenes, but feels a bit too cluttered in a lot of other places. For instance, there is a scene in a cottage where every pot and pan on the shelves is painstakingly rendered. In a scene like that it's hard not to long for a more Mignola/shadow-heavy approach. However, the storytelling in this volume is top-notch yet again, with some deliciously spooky and even tragic (the giant that guards the well!) side-characters and a lot of exciting prospects for the war to come.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Aritra Dasgupta

    I really loved so many parts of this and I'm super hyped about what Duncan Fegredo does with this(also wow his last name sounds like a pasta variation). But as a whole, this is so narratively dissonant, like there are two halves to this story, the England one, which legit confused the fuck out of me the first time I read it and the Baba Yaga which is one of the coolest comics I have ever read, BLEEDING snarky hero taking on humongous monsters facing certain death is totally my thing. I also love I really loved so many parts of this and I'm super hyped about what Duncan Fegredo does with this(also wow his last name sounds like a pasta variation). But as a whole, this is so narratively dissonant, like there are two halves to this story, the England one, which legit confused the fuck out of me the first time I read it and the Baba Yaga which is one of the coolest comics I have ever read, BLEEDING snarky hero taking on humongous monsters facing certain death is totally my thing. I also loved the twists of the England tale(especially the first one). Man, I wish this was two separate stories, cause on their own they're excellent, especially baba yaga but they just don't mix together. The B plot of resurrecting the new queen of the witches felt bland and I just wanted to get back to the main story. This had so much potential but ultimately didn't land for me. ps someone explain this witchfinder shit to me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    Apparently I was wrong about Hellboy heading back to London, because he's still off on his own in this volume. One thing I liked - Duncan Fegredo takes over the art, and his Hellboy is a little more detailed than Mignola's. It's an interesting switch, and keeping an eye on the changes helped take my attention off the one thing I didn't like - there was no real reason for this story to take 6 whole issues. Not very much happens, mostly lots of fighting and crashing and booming. There are interest Apparently I was wrong about Hellboy heading back to London, because he's still off on his own in this volume. One thing I liked - Duncan Fegredo takes over the art, and his Hellboy is a little more detailed than Mignola's. It's an interesting switch, and keeping an eye on the changes helped take my attention off the one thing I didn't like - there was no real reason for this story to take 6 whole issues. Not very much happens, mostly lots of fighting and crashing and booming. There are interesting characters who interact with Hellboy, but I think the same story could have been told in far fewer issues.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Greensmith

    "Your father was lord over the witches of Lancashire and Abbotsbury. East Bromwich. Faversham. Berkswell. And your mother was a witch. Who, then, has more right to be king?" This was marginally better than the last one as it was one story but they are all so samey, the same stories and revelations, but told slightly differently with different characters, and they always seem to confuse me, but maybe that is my fault. It did delve a little into Hellboys origin, which was interesting but I swear we "Your father was lord over the witches of Lancashire and Abbotsbury. East Bromwich. Faversham. Berkswell. And your mother was a witch. Who, then, has more right to be king?" This was marginally better than the last one as it was one story but they are all so samey, the same stories and revelations, but told slightly differently with different characters, and they always seem to confuse me, but maybe that is my fault. It did delve a little into Hellboys origin, which was interesting but I swear we have heard that stuff before? I dont know, its obviously not for me, I will give one more volume a go, and if that is the same I will part ways with Hellboy...2🌟

  22. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    First of all I have to say that the art is perfect! Duncan Fegredo has a very similar style to Mike Mignola without it seeming like he's trying to emulate his work. The detail, colour, settings are wonderfully illustrated, Duncan has some serious skill. Mike has done a brilliant job with the story, the writing is solid and the mix of Hellboy mythology and folklore is spot on. Overall this was a really enjoyable volume and highly recommended to Hellboy fans, although newcomers would definitely be First of all I have to say that the art is perfect! Duncan Fegredo has a very similar style to Mike Mignola without it seeming like he's trying to emulate his work. The detail, colour, settings are wonderfully illustrated, Duncan has some serious skill. Mike has done a brilliant job with the story, the writing is solid and the mix of Hellboy mythology and folklore is spot on. Overall this was a really enjoyable volume and highly recommended to Hellboy fans, although newcomers would definitely be confused!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    I almost didn't want to read Hellboy 8, when I saw that Mignola hadn't drawn it, because every non-Mignola Hellboy drawing I'd ever seen was terrible (including those dreadful "Galleries" in the back of previous books). But I was pleasantly surprised. This is a great, well drawn story that brings together threads from almost every previous Hellboy book. It's also a cliffhanger, and I'm looking forward to the next installment. I almost didn't want to read Hellboy 8, when I saw that Mignola hadn't drawn it, because every non-Mignola Hellboy drawing I'd ever seen was terrible (including those dreadful "Galleries" in the back of previous books). But I was pleasantly surprised. This is a great, well drawn story that brings together threads from almost every previous Hellboy book. It's also a cliffhanger, and I'm looking forward to the next installment.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Luke Zwanziger

    Another great Hellboy tale that ties in all of Hellboy's past adventures drawing in new and old enemies into a beautiful, yet nightmarish dreamscape complete in Duncan Fegredo's art. Nothing like blending a bit of Russian folktale/mythology with british witches and historical figures. Plus the epilogues one finds in this collection are awesome! (you won't get them in the normal comic issues) Sir Edward Grey anyone? Another great Hellboy tale that ties in all of Hellboy's past adventures drawing in new and old enemies into a beautiful, yet nightmarish dreamscape complete in Duncan Fegredo's art. Nothing like blending a bit of Russian folktale/mythology with british witches and historical figures. Plus the epilogues one finds in this collection are awesome! (you won't get them in the normal comic issues) Sir Edward Grey anyone?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    This was a very good longer story. Hellboy and the witches! The witches were needing to choose a new ruler, he had to fight Baba Yaga (or her minions) and there was lots of wonderful mythology and folktales wound up in it. (Though perhaps a bit too many fights) Even though Mike wasn't doing the art it still looked and felt like Hellboy. This was a very good longer story. Hellboy and the witches! The witches were needing to choose a new ruler, he had to fight Baba Yaga (or her minions) and there was lots of wonderful mythology and folktales wound up in it. (Though perhaps a bit too many fights) Even though Mike wasn't doing the art it still looked and felt like Hellboy.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    Can't fault this series and really enjoy the history of myths or legends Mignola uses to create story arcs. I'm now looking forward to the spinoff series as just having Hellboy alone is great but there is a team that doesn't get any play in the solo series. Can't fault this series and really enjoy the history of myths or legends Mignola uses to create story arcs. I'm now looking forward to the spinoff series as just having Hellboy alone is great but there is a team that doesn't get any play in the solo series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    SE Panoply

    https://bookwayfarer.wordpress.com/20... Italy, a hooded man is praying occult-style with a pool of blood to Hecate, he speaking like he is commanding her to appear, but once she does, immediately grovels his allegiance to her, and shows her his lizard legs when she orders him. He goes rogue, though by deciding to bind her with her secret name, Ilsa, the lover of Giurescu. In England, a crow drops a carved HB figure to her sis’, as HB is woken from a nap. An elderly man whom refers to him as cous https://bookwayfarer.wordpress.com/20... Italy, a hooded man is praying occult-style with a pool of blood to Hecate, he speaking like he is commanding her to appear, but once she does, immediately grovels his allegiance to her, and shows her his lizard legs when she orders him. He goes rogue, though by deciding to bind her with her secret name, Ilsa, the lover of Giurescu. In England, a crow drops a carved HB figure to her sis’, as HB is woken from a nap. An elderly man whom refers to him as cousin, Middleton makes sure he’s settled and tells of being happy to be hosting him despite it being impromptu. Middleton also gifts him his old .45, since he lost his in the sea. He tells Harry he won’t be long, and before he leaves, Harry states how proud Trevor is of him. HB walks through the woods as the sis’ say their spell, HB seeing a corpse-like face in the trees. He then sees a trio traveling to a hangman’s platform, to collect 3 sis’ hung there by an infamous and corrupt witchfinder. HB follows the group as they run off from what sounds like the sisters necks breaking, HB soon seeing them turn corpse and witchly as they speak of this being the night of witches gathering. They all really get into ganging up on HB, since they sense his connection to a witch. As they’re flying him a way to Leeds, he gets himself loose, and falls into a house with more witches who know him, they recounting what’d occurred so far, and Bromhead having stolen Hecate’s power. HB isn’t sympathetic to them, so they promise war against him, and so turn to Baba Yaga to trap him, which she does. HB is in a snowy, and hilly area, about to face off with an undead army head on. England, Graugach interrupts the witches, he talking how if they made Hecate queen of them, she could rejuvenate them again. Meanwhile, HB is taking the skeleton army on, and they tell of getting an eye for Baba Yaga, so HB runs off into the woods, where giant wolves go after the army and lead him to their leader, the Leshii, whom gives HB 1 night to rest, then move on. HB starts off in the morning as BY gets help from another by promising his freedom. HB goes into a house and makes friends with a Russian house spirit, telling his war stories, the domovoi in return telling him he’d gotten the favor of Perun. Domo also shares of Koshchei being bribed by BY to kill him, so now HB had a new goal. BY next goes after Perun, killing him, since she chooses to be the only god in Russia. In England, Graugach sees blood in a place the witches wish to reclaim, the giant who lives there, helps them open the top to a deep hole. HB is interrupted by Koshchei, whom gives him a good few punches, but then HB gets a hold of his sword, but what really puts him down, is an ethereal and royal looking girl. As Vasilisa leads HB off through the snow, she tells her origin story. As she shows HB how to leave, she also is killed, HB sadly facing off with Koshchei. Vasilisa gives 2 gifts to HB she’d received when she was old. HB uses it against Koshchei, and he’s surrounded by a large tall-tree’d forest, which sprung from a comb. Graugach waits for the giant to retrieve the 1 whom could help his cause from the bottom of the deep hole. After, Graugach offers the giant join them, but he bows out in pref of chilling in the hole, having no interest in the destruction he’d seen happen with Graugach before. HB sees Koshchei’s body stuck in the trees thinking BY would now have no choice, but to come after him herself, but she uses 1 more tactic, by reviving Koshchei with her breath, giving him power in the process. HB is now waylaid again before being able to exit. Koshchei is forced to combat HB til he succeeds in getting his eye for BY. After stabbing HB with a staff, it’s obv HB would have to willingly give his eye, and this wasn’t going to happen any time soon. HB travels to Italy where Bromhead had made himself ill by swallowing the moon, and begs HB to send him to hell, so he obliges. Bromhead tells HB of seeing him on his dragon at the head of his army, and HB tells him to shut up before he dies. Then in England, Graugach refuses to listen to Dagda, 1 of his group killing him, then himself from guilt. Graugach spouts of this being the time for the Queen of blood rather than the King of dust. In Colorado, at BPRD HQ, Abe listens to a letter from HB after 6 years of no contact, and the letter had been dated a month back. HB shares of being in England with Middleton, Abe noting the man having died in the mid-80s. In Hecate’s tomb, Edward Gray gives Hecate a chance to tell her story. She does, but also shares his fate before bidding him farewell. Another trippy installment. Such an easy series to go through. Onward!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Lex

    I think that maybe this is the longest hellboy story and I loved it! In this volume Duncan Fegredo is in charge of the art and it is great because the difference is almost imperceptible if we compare it with Mignola's, but even so the artist's own essence is noticed. In this new volume, Hellboy finally takes a break after the critical events of past numbers, but that happiness does not last for a long time, in a simple outdoor walk he encounters quite strange guys who are eventually persec I think that maybe this is the longest hellboy story and I loved it! In this volume Duncan Fegredo is in charge of the art and it is great because the difference is almost imperceptible if we compare it with Mignola's, but even so the artist's own essence is noticed. In this new volume, Hellboy finally takes a break after the critical events of past numbers, but that happiness does not last for a long time, in a simple outdoor walk he encounters quite strange guys who are eventually persecuted and this is where the adventure begins ... (view spoiler)[This book has two parallel plots, in the first one Hellboy is brought to a strange witches den who want him as their king, remember that he is the son of a devil who was king of all that witches before and also of a powerful witch, but obviously hellboy declines. This brings him to an unknown realm that we find out later is the kingdom of Babba Yaga, where the witch finally after so many threats decides that it is time to take revenge on Hellboy and kill him or at least take an eye. On the other hand in another place Hecate is being brought back to life, but maybe not as she would like ... (hide spoiler)] I do not understand how the volumes progress and Hellboy is still an excellent comic worthy of 5 stars. And at last but not least, this volume have some extra pages with sketches and notos from Mignola and Fegredo, a complete delight!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    For whatever reason, it took me a little bit to get into this, the eighth Hellboy volume, Darkness Calls. I'm not sure why, probably a mood thing, but it ended up being one of my favorite stories yet; up there with the fourth volume. Duncan Fegredo was responsible for the art on the entire thing and I thought he did a phenomenal job. His style is similar enough to Mignola's to have the entire endeavor feel very in-world, but different enough to stand as testament to his own skill. The story revol For whatever reason, it took me a little bit to get into this, the eighth Hellboy volume, Darkness Calls. I'm not sure why, probably a mood thing, but it ended up being one of my favorite stories yet; up there with the fourth volume. Duncan Fegredo was responsible for the art on the entire thing and I thought he did a phenomenal job. His style is similar enough to Mignola's to have the entire endeavor feel very in-world, but different enough to stand as testament to his own skill. The story revolves around the fact that the witches of Britain have, frankly speaking, had enough of Hellboy's shit. They've decided to call upon the Baba Yaga to do something about him. You know the Baba Yaga; that ancient witch of Russia whose eye Hellboy shot out? Yeah, well, she's pissed. An eye for an eye.. A lot of different characters in the Hellboy mythology are involved in this one which made it a whole lot of fun - and the end suggests that the story told here is not quite finished.. The Midnight Trumpet sounds... And Darkness Calls

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    I’ve been reading the new omnibus editions, but the order I’m sticking to suggests tackling “Darkness Calls” and “Wild Hunt” in between Plague of Frogs volumes three and four. This is correct because the first epilogue in this book references B.P.R.D. events, confirming that it takes place during the Plague storyline. Even if I read it later though, I still would have loved this book because it’s phenomenal. “Darkness Calls” follows Hellboy’s Africa excursion and finds him summoned by witches in I’ve been reading the new omnibus editions, but the order I’m sticking to suggests tackling “Darkness Calls” and “Wild Hunt” in between Plague of Frogs volumes three and four. This is correct because the first epilogue in this book references B.P.R.D. events, confirming that it takes place during the Plague storyline. Even if I read it later though, I still would have loved this book because it’s phenomenal. “Darkness Calls” follows Hellboy’s Africa excursion and finds him summoned by witches in England, then confronted by Baba Yaga who wants revenge on him for knocking out her eye. This arc is heavy on Russian folklore and the storytelling is breathtaking at parts. Mignola knows how dark and epic mythology is, and these six issues are proof. There’s a lot going on, but I was glued to the page and, as always with Hellboy, fascinated by how Mignola was using mythology to tell the story. Though I haven’t yet finished Hellboy, I should think “Darkness Calls” is near the pinnacle. Just awesome.

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