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Philippians

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With its user-friendly design, this commentary by Moisés Silva provides a substantive yet accessible discussion of Philippians to help pastors, students, and teachers understand and explain this letter. Each passage is presented in three parts: Silva's own translation of the Greek text; exegesis and exposition of each unit of thought; and additional notes on textual matter With its user-friendly design, this commentary by Moisés Silva provides a substantive yet accessible discussion of Philippians to help pastors, students, and teachers understand and explain this letter. Each passage is presented in three parts: Silva's own translation of the Greek text; exegesis and exposition of each unit of thought; and additional notes on textual matters. Throughout the commentary, Silva asks what is distinctive about this letter and shows how each passage contributes to Paul's overall argument. The second edition has been updated to interact with important recent scholarship on Philippians and to incorporate the well-regarded BECNT layout.


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With its user-friendly design, this commentary by Moisés Silva provides a substantive yet accessible discussion of Philippians to help pastors, students, and teachers understand and explain this letter. Each passage is presented in three parts: Silva's own translation of the Greek text; exegesis and exposition of each unit of thought; and additional notes on textual matter With its user-friendly design, this commentary by Moisés Silva provides a substantive yet accessible discussion of Philippians to help pastors, students, and teachers understand and explain this letter. Each passage is presented in three parts: Silva's own translation of the Greek text; exegesis and exposition of each unit of thought; and additional notes on textual matters. Throughout the commentary, Silva asks what is distinctive about this letter and shows how each passage contributes to Paul's overall argument. The second edition has been updated to interact with important recent scholarship on Philippians and to incorporate the well-regarded BECNT layout.

30 review for Philippians

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kofi Opoku

    This is fantastic. I was impressed with the author’s ability to deal with the text technically while keeping it accessible. I also appreciated that he included several references and footnotes dealing with the broader discussions surrounding each verse.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ricky Garcia

    Great commentary! I used it as a resource to preach through the book of Philippians. It was very helpful!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Kennedy

    Read my full review here: http://mydigitalseminary.wordpress.co... This commentary was nice and succinct. It was more techical than Fee overall, and sometimes I was got lost because ideas are dealt with in so few words. Silva comes from more of a Reformed background and it shows in some of his presuppositions. Where Silva and Fee disagreed I tended to lean more towards Fee, but Silva covered some areas that Fee seemed to overlook, particularly the sovereignty of God/responsibility of man and doctr Read my full review here: http://mydigitalseminary.wordpress.co... This commentary was nice and succinct. It was more techical than Fee overall, and sometimes I was got lost because ideas are dealt with in so few words. Silva comes from more of a Reformed background and it shows in some of his presuppositions. Where Silva and Fee disagreed I tended to lean more towards Fee, but Silva covered some areas that Fee seemed to overlook, particularly the sovereignty of God/responsibility of man and doctrines like justification, sanctification, union with Christ, found throughought Philippians.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Seth Mcdevitt

    It was a good commentary, but the Fee NICNT and the Hawthorn/Martin WBC were plenty. If you are pressed for time, this would be my first choice.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Brief and impactful. But some tertiary thoughts germane to my galavanting through several exegetical commentaries the past several years. Commentaries like this are not expositional. You will not get a "sense" of the meaning of the text very easily the way you would in a sermon. This kind of work is exegetical. The author will engage the text and find the meaning, and continue along presupposing you're smart enough to grasp the bigger picture without much hand holding. Most people aren't, so they Brief and impactful. But some tertiary thoughts germane to my galavanting through several exegetical commentaries the past several years. Commentaries like this are not expositional. You will not get a "sense" of the meaning of the text very easily the way you would in a sermon. This kind of work is exegetical. The author will engage the text and find the meaning, and continue along presupposing you're smart enough to grasp the bigger picture without much hand holding. Most people aren't, so they're locked away from these kinds of better commentaries. To be honest, I have a love hate relationship with the BECT formatting because it guts a lot of what makes a good commentary good and relegates it to footnotes. However, I will relent, when it comes to understanding the "sense" of the text, it's necessary. Silva does possibly the best job I've ever seen of not imposing constructed categories onto the text (e.g. God's sovereignty vs. human responsibility), but derives them from the text and uses common categories when appropriate with the caveat that they need to be drawn from the text, not imposed. He also impresses the idea that you must approach the text not as independent verses and clauses (though good exegetical commentary does that), but trying to capture the main idea in the text block, and supporting that idea with the various clauses within. You'd think this would be common in an exegetical commentary, but I don't see it as often as I'd like. Many times a point is made, but the supporting points are severally lacking in substantiating the main idea (JUST LIKE BAD PREACHING COUGH COUGH). Silva also doesn't only rely upon lexical data for understanding of words (BDAG and subsequently TDNT, etc.). He commits a cardinal sin when exegeting what the author is writing: he interprets Scripture with Scripture. But he's careful in how he appeals to other Scripture to support his interpretation. Commentators have a habit of positing their interpretation that's built upon their presuppositions, and cross reference as necessary to support. Silva tries hard to not commit this error. And the lexical data he appeals to is based upon the same consider of Lou-Nida and finding a semantic domain within the larger appeal of Scripture, instead of using BDAG as a crutch (even though is a very very good crutch). There's also some interaction with other commentary. The most important ones are with Lightfoot and Hawthorne, even if there isn't overall disagree with the meaning. The exegetical differences are definitely enlightening, though...how should we say...cumbersome, especially if, again, you don't know the languages. Silva also doesn't entertain redactional or form criticism, and that is refreshing. The form of the text as we currently have it received is what is to believed on how it is originally composed. We don't have compelling data to believe otherwise. (O'Brien talks about this more, and I'll get to him later, even if he plagiarized - it's still probably the best work on Philippians). So I'm torn on this work. I actually agree with what it's accomplishing for the reader to understand Scripture (even if, at times, Silva also assumes you're following him and can grasp the meaning without explicit mention), but calling this a true exegetical, verse by verse, clause by clause, word by word commentary? Debatable. But I will argue: how useful are those kinds of commentaries? Look at their footnotes. Thus the consternation. If you can't at least follow the arguments made based upon the original language, this work isn't for you. But if you can, or if you want to try, and you want to see a master show how to substantiate the full meaning of a paragraph by the text within it, appealing to the salient nuance within the text and leaving supporting material in the footnotes (text critical issues, some interpretative matters that don't affect the overall meaning, etc.), this is an excellent work. So the summary? Joy of Christ in Unity

  6. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    Conciseness is this book's greatest strength, and greatest weakness. At times he captures complex ideas in pithy ways, without unnecessarily rambling on. At other times one is left wanting him to elaborate more on certain points. Conciseness is this book's greatest strength, and greatest weakness. At times he captures complex ideas in pithy ways, without unnecessarily rambling on. At other times one is left wanting him to elaborate more on certain points.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nick Roark

    Okay

  8. 4 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    I really enjoyed this commentary on Philippians. Silva kept to the issues and addressed major textual problems in the footnotes and endnotes. His translations were especially helpful in letting me know if my translations were on track.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Schneider

    I found this commentary to be very helpful. The author assumes some basic knowledge of Greek, but also provides helpful translations of the texts. Despite being more of an academic work, I found it to be quite practical. This would be a highly suggested commentary for the book of Philippians.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Raully

    Very technical treatment of the text for this-layman. On the plus side, it helped this layman greatly in leading a small group discussion of Philippians. On the minus side, it was often so technical a treatment of the text that I wouldn't recommend it for many other fellow laymen. Very technical treatment of the text for this-layman. On the plus side, it helped this layman greatly in leading a small group discussion of Philippians. On the minus side, it was often so technical a treatment of the text that I wouldn't recommend it for many other fellow laymen.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peter Krol

    A decent expositional commentary. He assumes some knowledge of Greek, but otherwise quite readable. I went to high school with his son (and we were in jazz band together), so I had to read this one when I studied Philippians this semester. :)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Wonderful. Technical, exegetical, practical and presents all the pertinent views.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Mcleod

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Campbell

  15. 5 out of 5

    Allen Tsai

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cbarrett

  17. 5 out of 5

    Trey

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael Miller

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gavin Breeden

  22. 5 out of 5

    Roger Watkins

  23. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Sutton

  24. 5 out of 5

    Noai Leidenfrost

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  27. 5 out of 5

    Blaise Shields

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jared Yaple

  29. 5 out of 5

    Peter Dray

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Olivarez

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