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The Spy Who Painted the Queen: The Secret Case Against Philip de László

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The only book to examine MI5's secret evidence that high society painter Philip de Laszlo was an Austrian spy in World War I—with a shocking conclusion In 1917, noted society portrait painter Philip de László, who painted such luminaries as the Pope, the Austrian emperor, King Edward VII, and Prince Louis Battenberg, was subjected to a secret tribunal which interned him for The only book to examine MI5's secret evidence that high society painter Philip de Laszlo was an Austrian spy in World War I—with a shocking conclusion In 1917, noted society portrait painter Philip de László, who painted such luminaries as the Pope, the Austrian emperor, King Edward VII, and Prince Louis Battenberg, was subjected to a secret tribunal which interned him for trading with the enemy. De László had pulled strings to be naturalized as British at the outbreak of World War I, but in 1919 he was referred to a public committee to revoke his naturalization. With the aid of skilled lawyer de László had the application overturned—however, newly discovered records show MI5 had evidence obtained from a top secret source that alleged that he was supplying the enemy with important information on politics and industrial production. Crucially, the source’s anonymity prevented MI5 from presenting evidence to the tribunal. But was de László a secret agent and was MI5’s source really as they claimed? Did an enemy spy really paint the portrait of the young Princess Elizabeth? With previously unpublished information, this book explores these allegations and reaches a shocking conclusion.


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The only book to examine MI5's secret evidence that high society painter Philip de Laszlo was an Austrian spy in World War I—with a shocking conclusion In 1917, noted society portrait painter Philip de László, who painted such luminaries as the Pope, the Austrian emperor, King Edward VII, and Prince Louis Battenberg, was subjected to a secret tribunal which interned him for The only book to examine MI5's secret evidence that high society painter Philip de Laszlo was an Austrian spy in World War I—with a shocking conclusion In 1917, noted society portrait painter Philip de László, who painted such luminaries as the Pope, the Austrian emperor, King Edward VII, and Prince Louis Battenberg, was subjected to a secret tribunal which interned him for trading with the enemy. De László had pulled strings to be naturalized as British at the outbreak of World War I, but in 1919 he was referred to a public committee to revoke his naturalization. With the aid of skilled lawyer de László had the application overturned—however, newly discovered records show MI5 had evidence obtained from a top secret source that alleged that he was supplying the enemy with important information on politics and industrial production. Crucially, the source’s anonymity prevented MI5 from presenting evidence to the tribunal. But was de László a secret agent and was MI5’s source really as they claimed? Did an enemy spy really paint the portrait of the young Princess Elizabeth? With previously unpublished information, this book explores these allegations and reaches a shocking conclusion.

18 review for The Spy Who Painted the Queen: The Secret Case Against Philip de László

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julian Walker

    A highly detailed and thoroughly researched insight into a society-related security scandal. I hadn't heard of this issue, but got it for the title, and although it was an enjoyable read, I was left with a slight feeling of 'who cares' when I had finished it. A highly detailed and thoroughly researched insight into a society-related security scandal. I hadn't heard of this issue, but got it for the title, and although it was an enjoyable read, I was left with a slight feeling of 'who cares' when I had finished it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Engle

    A very factual exploration of the possibility that Philip de Laszlo, the Edwardian society portraitist, may have been a spy for Austro-Hungary during the First World War ... it definitely demonstrates that de Laszlo's wealth and society-connections freed him from the penalties generally meted out to those who sent money to enemy countries and corresponded via the diplomatic "bag," rather than the post (which was censored) ... although he was interned as an enemy alien for part of the war, de Las A very factual exploration of the possibility that Philip de Laszlo, the Edwardian society portraitist, may have been a spy for Austro-Hungary during the First World War ... it definitely demonstrates that de Laszlo's wealth and society-connections freed him from the penalties generally meted out to those who sent money to enemy countries and corresponded via the diplomatic "bag," rather than the post (which was censored) ... although he was interned as an enemy alien for part of the war, de Laszlo managed to "get off scot-free" despite breaking arguably harsh DORA laws ...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Brady

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gertrude Corey

  5. 4 out of 5

    T Guy

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

  7. 4 out of 5

    D. Dale

  8. 5 out of 5

    Beiza

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Oldham

  10. 4 out of 5

    loisa beiza

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bmonica

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Meridith

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Smith

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily Olsen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex

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