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Buying a Better World: George Soros and Billionaire Philanthropy

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The incredible, inside story of the man and the organization changing the way we change the world. George Soros is well known as the legendary speculator who made a fortune betting against the British pound in 1992, but he is also a philanthropist who has spent billions in order to promote democracy around the world. Morton Abramowitz of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace onc The incredible, inside story of the man and the organization changing the way we change the world. George Soros is well known as the legendary speculator who made a fortune betting against the British pound in 1992, but he is also a philanthropist who has spent billions in order to promote democracy around the world. Morton Abramowitz of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace once said that Soros was “the only private citizen with his own foreign policy.”


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The incredible, inside story of the man and the organization changing the way we change the world. George Soros is well known as the legendary speculator who made a fortune betting against the British pound in 1992, but he is also a philanthropist who has spent billions in order to promote democracy around the world. Morton Abramowitz of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace onc The incredible, inside story of the man and the organization changing the way we change the world. George Soros is well known as the legendary speculator who made a fortune betting against the British pound in 1992, but he is also a philanthropist who has spent billions in order to promote democracy around the world. Morton Abramowitz of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace once said that Soros was “the only private citizen with his own foreign policy.”

30 review for Buying a Better World: George Soros and Billionaire Philanthropy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ajay Palekar

    This is the kind of book that ambles and wanders without a clear structure or thesis. While not excellent writing, the book really dives into the full story of George Soros's foundations and philanthropic efforts all across the world for the last few decades. I loved the clear portraits of key people who have partnered with Soros over the years, particularly Neier. What set this book apart was actually the ending summary, the author makes a judgement of Soros's overall legacy that left me stunne This is the kind of book that ambles and wanders without a clear structure or thesis. While not excellent writing, the book really dives into the full story of George Soros's foundations and philanthropic efforts all across the world for the last few decades. I loved the clear portraits of key people who have partnered with Soros over the years, particularly Neier. What set this book apart was actually the ending summary, the author makes a judgement of Soros's overall legacy that left me stunned. While the book is quite complimentary overall to Soros's character and accomplishments, in one page of excellent writing, Anna Porter succinctly describes why this multi-billionaire has in-fact failed to create the legacy he desired. It's immensely humbling to compare this man's success in life and his failures in fostering democracy, human rights, and open society around the world. Worse still is the valid though no full elaborated comment that Soros made his fortunes through financial speculations the have hurt the world far more than his philanthropy has made a difference. The judgement was bold, but memorable.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Julia Poncho

    This was a fair portrait of Georges Soros, but would need an epilogue or update for 2019. It would have been interesting to examine Soros NGOs activities post-Brexit and post-Trump, which I think furthermore confirmed Anna Porter’s conclusion in this book which goes along the lines of “just because you are good at finance and banking, doesn’t mean you are good at politics...especially if your politics criticize the way you actually made your money.” I got the impression that Soros was a “do as I This was a fair portrait of Georges Soros, but would need an epilogue or update for 2019. It would have been interesting to examine Soros NGOs activities post-Brexit and post-Trump, which I think furthermore confirmed Anna Porter’s conclusion in this book which goes along the lines of “just because you are good at finance and banking, doesn’t mean you are good at politics...especially if your politics criticize the way you actually made your money.” I got the impression that Soros was a “do as I say, not as I do”-type of person after reading this? But still the credit was given where it was due to Soros for providing capacity building (it really was that-Soros was there where the UN was supposed to be and had failed) to former Eastern Bloc and Yugoslav countries in the 1990s. Also what would have been interesting, Anna Porter being Hungarian and all, would have been to address more in depth the personal relation between Soros and PM Viktor Orban, and why Orban is so hateful of Soros.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kira

    Overall, an interesting read, but the writing bothered me at times. The author seemed to cramp a lot into some of the chapters, skipped around, added what felt like unnecessary descriptions and had entire paragraphs where the point was merely suggestive.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andy Bintoro

    Basically this is what George Soros did in his foundation and life as philanthropist. Its not complete and the story not that interesting to follow.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hella Comat

    I'd never heard of George Soros, but he's in the philanthropy class of Bill Gates, having given billions of dollars to charitable ventures worldwide. The interesting thing about his Open Society Foundation is that he has donated money to a huge variety of causes - human rights, climate change, democracy, drugs, and on and on. Also, his philosophy was to let people at the local level have input as to where the money would work, as opposed to being told by the donators what it was to be used for. I'd never heard of George Soros, but he's in the philanthropy class of Bill Gates, having given billions of dollars to charitable ventures worldwide. The interesting thing about his Open Society Foundation is that he has donated money to a huge variety of causes - human rights, climate change, democracy, drugs, and on and on. Also, his philosophy was to let people at the local level have input as to where the money would work, as opposed to being told by the donators what it was to be used for. He's quite controversial as Soros made the bulk of his fortune speculating on currency trading. He has certainly given back, though!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

    the cover of a book gets the eyes of a book reader this book takes a 5 in my book: waiting for more exciting books from your writings:

  7. 4 out of 5

    GLORIA M EDWARDS

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tomi T

  9. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Davies

  10. 4 out of 5

    AeZoo8oh

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  12. 5 out of 5

    Márton

  13. 5 out of 5

    József Szabó

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ahalbert

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lina

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell Wade

  17. 5 out of 5

    Abhigna Brahmbhatt

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dundurn Press

  19. 4 out of 5

    Máté Jokán

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alex Musicaendless

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ervin Gyaraki

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sergey Lobachev

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paul Mamani

  25. 4 out of 5

    John McKend

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jens

  27. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

  28. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  30. 5 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

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