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Cracking the Tech Career: Insider Advice on Landing a Job at Google, Microsoft, Apple, or any Top Tech Company

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Become the applicant Google can't turn down Cracking the Tech Career is the job seeker's guide to landing a coveted position at one of the top tech firms. A follow-up to The Google Resume, this book provides new information on what these companies want, and how to show them you have what it takes to succeed in the role. Early planners will learn what to study, and establis Become the applicant Google can't turn down Cracking the Tech Career is the job seeker's guide to landing a coveted position at one of the top tech firms. A follow-up to The Google Resume, this book provides new information on what these companies want, and how to show them you have what it takes to succeed in the role. Early planners will learn what to study, and established professionals will discover how to make their skillset and experience set them apart from the crowd. Author Gayle Laakmann McDowell worked in engineering at Google, and interviewed over 120 candidates as a member of the hiring committee – in this book, she shares her perspectives on what works and what doesn't, what makes you desirable, and what gets your resume saved or deleted. Apple, Microsoft, and Google are the coveted companies in the current job market. They field hundreds of resumes every day, and have their pick of the cream of the crop when it comes to selecting new hires. If you think the right alma mater is all it takes, you need to update your thinking. Top companies, especially in the tech sector, are looking for more. This book is the complete guide to becoming the candidate they just cannot turn away. Discover the career paths that run through the top tech firms Learn how to craft the prefect resume and prepare for the interview Find ways to make yourself stand out from the hordes of other applicants Understand what the top companies are looking for, and how to demonstrate that you're it These companies need certain skillsets, but they also want a great culture fit. Grades aren't everything, experience matters, and a certain type of applicant tends to succeed. Cracking the Tech Career reveals what the hiring committee wants, and shows you how to get it.


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Become the applicant Google can't turn down Cracking the Tech Career is the job seeker's guide to landing a coveted position at one of the top tech firms. A follow-up to The Google Resume, this book provides new information on what these companies want, and how to show them you have what it takes to succeed in the role. Early planners will learn what to study, and establis Become the applicant Google can't turn down Cracking the Tech Career is the job seeker's guide to landing a coveted position at one of the top tech firms. A follow-up to The Google Resume, this book provides new information on what these companies want, and how to show them you have what it takes to succeed in the role. Early planners will learn what to study, and established professionals will discover how to make their skillset and experience set them apart from the crowd. Author Gayle Laakmann McDowell worked in engineering at Google, and interviewed over 120 candidates as a member of the hiring committee – in this book, she shares her perspectives on what works and what doesn't, what makes you desirable, and what gets your resume saved or deleted. Apple, Microsoft, and Google are the coveted companies in the current job market. They field hundreds of resumes every day, and have their pick of the cream of the crop when it comes to selecting new hires. If you think the right alma mater is all it takes, you need to update your thinking. Top companies, especially in the tech sector, are looking for more. This book is the complete guide to becoming the candidate they just cannot turn away. Discover the career paths that run through the top tech firms Learn how to craft the prefect resume and prepare for the interview Find ways to make yourself stand out from the hordes of other applicants Understand what the top companies are looking for, and how to demonstrate that you're it These companies need certain skillsets, but they also want a great culture fit. Grades aren't everything, experience matters, and a certain type of applicant tends to succeed. Cracking the Tech Career reveals what the hiring committee wants, and shows you how to get it.

30 review for Cracking the Tech Career: Insider Advice on Landing a Job at Google, Microsoft, Apple, or any Top Tech Company

  1. 4 out of 5

    Graeme Shimmin

    I only know Gayle from reading her answers on Quora, and I'm not easily impressed by people's reputations, but having looked through this book it's very clear that she knows exactly what she is talking about. I used to work in the technology industry and had a successful career - successful enough that I retired aged 35. Gayle's advice is the kind of information I would have liked to have known when I started, rather than learning by trial and error. The book is perhaps particularly useful if you I only know Gayle from reading her answers on Quora, and I'm not easily impressed by people's reputations, but having looked through this book it's very clear that she knows exactly what she is talking about. I used to work in the technology industry and had a successful career - successful enough that I retired aged 35. Gayle's advice is the kind of information I would have liked to have known when I started, rather than learning by trial and error. The book is perhaps particularly useful if you are just starting your career (or even still in education - there's a a useful section on 'Advanced Positioning and Preparation') As you might expect, the bulk of the book is about actually getting that dream job, i.e.: - Resumes. - Cover Letters. - References. - Interview Prep. - Refining your personal brand/pitch. - Behavioural Questions. - Problem Solving. - Interviews. There are also sections on specific 'dream' employers (Google, Apple, start ups, gaming companies, etc) I'm not really qualified to comment on the chapter on Women in Tech, but as Gayle says, it's not only women who suffer from the “imposter syndrome” that holds many talented people back from the success they deserve, and it certainly seemed like practical advice. Finally there are a couple of chapters on managing your career and leveraging your current position to work your way up. The book is written in a clear and engaging style with lots of bullet points, action items and short examples. There are useful real world questions and answers at the end of each chapter, that help to tie the theory and practice together. What it isn't, thankfully, is padded with 'humorous' cartoons, digressions and war stories. Cracking the Tech Career won't guarantee you that dream job, no book of career advice can, that's your responsibility, but all my life I've found that learning from other people's mistakes and cutting out the schoolboy errors puts me ahead of 90% of people. Who doesn't want to jump straight into the top 10%? Overall, a solid book, packed with practical advice. I recommend it, particularly to those just starting their career.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Talaat

    This book has become one of my reference books.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tony Poerio

    I like this book. Think of it as a 'soft skills' version of CTCI. And having advice from someone who's successfully made it is always invaluable. Would recommend. I like this book. Think of it as a 'soft skills' version of CTCI. And having advice from someone who's successfully made it is always invaluable. Would recommend.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anchit

    I briefly skimmed through the book. The whole book is created in chapters and it feels like the author was aiming for a complete information on various aspects in the process of getting a job in one of these big companies. I liked a few ideas in the book but I realized that the book is written more for a software developer. It wasn't clear how much of it applies to an SDET (software tester). So it felt overwhelming and too much. Things like traversing binary trees / algorithms are pretty tough w I briefly skimmed through the book. The whole book is created in chapters and it feels like the author was aiming for a complete information on various aspects in the process of getting a job in one of these big companies. I liked a few ideas in the book but I realized that the book is written more for a software developer. It wasn't clear how much of it applies to an SDET (software tester). So it felt overwhelming and too much. Things like traversing binary trees / algorithms are pretty tough when coding IMO. And it wasn't clear whether testers also need to prepare all that or not. Another thing that I disliked about the book was how he asks you to do mountains. I almost got a panic attack while reading this book because of various suggestions like: * Side project: You need to have something that makes you stand out from the crowd. Like perhaps you have created a website with a unique concept that is pretty cool and flourishing. Or you've created a game/application that is successful. * On the other hand if you have a side project that isn't performing well then don't mention it. That would actually be a hindrance because it would make you appear fickle-minded. Lots of other suggestions like these where you can be a superman to get into one of these companies. If I have to invent an entire mountain just to get into one of these companies then I would rather keep trying my own startup ideas. There's no gurantee that I'll get a 9-5 job anyway if I get in or job security. All these "top tech companies" are famous for laying off employees every now and then. Moreover, if I have to do so much of drama just to get into it there's no telling in what ways the people in these companies are going to judge each other (social status I mean). Somehow I have a feeling that the sense of "social status" is going to be bad in these companies. Overall, the book was pretty comprehensive but I felt that it didn't give me any shortcuts as such. It just kept asking me to produce mountains after mountains for covering various grounds. In the end I decided not to try for these companies if there's such a huge effort-payment required for it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    I wish I had read this book years ago. I think the title put me off, but McDowell has come highly recommended for Cracking the Coding Interview book, so I read this much smaller book. This book covers everything from resumes to interviews to negotiations all with the expertise of an experienced technical person at Microsoft. She gives insight about the differences between some top companies. It gives advice for those currently in college and seeking internships as well. Overall this is a very we I wish I had read this book years ago. I think the title put me off, but McDowell has come highly recommended for Cracking the Coding Interview book, so I read this much smaller book. This book covers everything from resumes to interviews to negotiations all with the expertise of an experienced technical person at Microsoft. She gives insight about the differences between some top companies. It gives advice for those currently in college and seeking internships as well. Overall this is a very well rounded book for tech jobs OR jobs at tech companies. I highly recommend and will add to my reference collection.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Pablo

    There's a lot of good information on this book and I wished I had read it on my 20s. Better latter than never though. I will definitely apply a lot of the advice here. I highly recommend this book to all people that want a career in tech, specially people still in college. Do yourself a favor, read this book, and save yourself a few years of stumbling around. There's a lot of good information on this book and I wished I had read it on my 20s. Better latter than never though. I will definitely apply a lot of the advice here. I highly recommend this book to all people that want a career in tech, specially people still in college. Do yourself a favor, read this book, and save yourself a few years of stumbling around.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Evgeniia

    The book is for those who are ready to begin the search for a new job and interview process soon. The advices are more general (not Google, Apple, etc. related). You can read separated chapters only, like the one with advices how to make your CV great.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Liam

    Pretty good compliment to CTCI although more broad / not as focused toward software engineers. This could easily serve as a handy reference book later on for behavioural interviews, resume tips and offer negotiation for jobs in tech.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pragzz

    Good book for someone who just graduated and needs career advice on starting This isn’t a book for seasoned executives. It’s a good overview of process and how to answer questions for a beginner out of school or college, or someone who has just moved to the US.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Zafar

    It is not a technical book but more about technic. I would say it is very good overview

  11. 4 out of 5

    Denys

    Good summary for growth in the tech career.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Olga Boiaryntseva

    This book will be especially helpful for recent grads.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Noor

    A good guideline for fresh graduate, especially for people who want to choose career in technology area.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ralph N

    It’s a de facto revised “Google Resume” book. Shouldn’t be its own book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hayden

    The book as a whole is pretty good, but the resume section is awesome. That alone is worth a few hundred dollars of resume coaching and editing if you follow it closely.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nicolas

    Super quick read. An accurate representation of working in major tech. At least for the Microsoft tidbits, 90+% is accurate today and 100% was accurate at the time of publication - with the main difference being that Windows ships much faster now. Cracking the Tech Career explores positions outside of dev and PM in tech - something I've never seen before. Highly recommend if you are interested in breaking into the tech field. Super quick read. An accurate representation of working in major tech. At least for the Microsoft tidbits, 90+% is accurate today and 100% was accurate at the time of publication - with the main difference being that Windows ships much faster now. Cracking the Tech Career explores positions outside of dev and PM in tech - something I've never seen before. Highly recommend if you are interested in breaking into the tech field.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alper Çuğun

    I knew most of this stuff but it was still a quick read and a welcome refresher. For people starting out their careers in this field, I would say this book is an essential way to learn the mores and save yourself from having to learn things the hard way.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Noventa

    Short and to the point. More of a generic tech job prep book. Not specific to programmers. Recommended for a peak at the industry, plus some tips.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emad Mokhtar

    This book is full of create career tips from preparing your resume to negotiation to get promoted, but please take with a grain of salt and read more and ask more on Quora.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Fahim Akhter

    wonderful for anyone who is serious about his career. its just not about tech job but any jobs in the modern world. great detailed analysis with research from resume to interviews

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alex Lo

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

  23. 4 out of 5

    Irina

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Acosta

  25. 5 out of 5

    Inigo Sarmiento

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pardita Patra

  27. 5 out of 5

    Qasim Zeeshan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cesar Agustin Garcia Vazquez

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Hoover

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