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Rocket Fuel: The One Essential Combination That Will Get You More of What You Want from Your Business

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Discover the vital relationship that will take your company from "What’s next?" to "We have liftoff!" Visionaries have groundbreaking ideas. Integrators make those ideas a reality. This explosive combination is the key to getting everything you want out of your business. It worked for Disney. It worked for McDonald’s. It worked for Ford. It can work for you. From the author Discover the vital relationship that will take your company from "What’s next?" to "We have liftoff!" Visionaries have groundbreaking ideas. Integrators make those ideas a reality. This explosive combination is the key to getting everything you want out of your business. It worked for Disney. It worked for McDonald’s. It worked for Ford. It can work for you. From the author of the bestselling Traction, Rocket Fuel details the integral roles of the Visionary and Integrator and explains how an effective relationship between the two can help your business thrive. Offering advice to help Visionary-minded and Integrator-minded individuals find one another, Rocket Fuel also features assessments so you’re able to determine whether you’re a Visionary or an Integrator. Without an Integrator, a Visionary is far less likely to succeed long-term ,and realize the company’s ultimate goals—likewise, with no Visionary, an Integrator can’t rise to his or her full potential. When these two people come together to share their natural talents and innate skill sets, it’s like rocket fuel—they have the power to reach new heights for virtually any company or organization.


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Discover the vital relationship that will take your company from "What’s next?" to "We have liftoff!" Visionaries have groundbreaking ideas. Integrators make those ideas a reality. This explosive combination is the key to getting everything you want out of your business. It worked for Disney. It worked for McDonald’s. It worked for Ford. It can work for you. From the author Discover the vital relationship that will take your company from "What’s next?" to "We have liftoff!" Visionaries have groundbreaking ideas. Integrators make those ideas a reality. This explosive combination is the key to getting everything you want out of your business. It worked for Disney. It worked for McDonald’s. It worked for Ford. It can work for you. From the author of the bestselling Traction, Rocket Fuel details the integral roles of the Visionary and Integrator and explains how an effective relationship between the two can help your business thrive. Offering advice to help Visionary-minded and Integrator-minded individuals find one another, Rocket Fuel also features assessments so you’re able to determine whether you’re a Visionary or an Integrator. Without an Integrator, a Visionary is far less likely to succeed long-term ,and realize the company’s ultimate goals—likewise, with no Visionary, an Integrator can’t rise to his or her full potential. When these two people come together to share their natural talents and innate skill sets, it’s like rocket fuel—they have the power to reach new heights for virtually any company or organization.

30 review for Rocket Fuel: The One Essential Combination That Will Get You More of What You Want from Your Business

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    Written for Visionaries, to help them see their need for an Integrator, and to help them find the Integrator that will be right for them. It assumes that if you're a founder, you're a Visionary. I'm an Integrator (87% score) business founder and owner without a Visionary, and there wasn't anything about how to find a Visionary to bring into my business. If you're a Visionary, you'll find it much more useful than I did. The introduction says,As a Visionary, this is the right book for you if you ar Written for Visionaries, to help them see their need for an Integrator, and to help them find the Integrator that will be right for them. It assumes that if you're a founder, you're a Visionary. I'm an Integrator (87% score) business founder and owner without a Visionary, and there wasn't anything about how to find a Visionary to bring into my business. If you're a Visionary, you'll find it much more useful than I did. The introduction says,As a Visionary, this is the right book for you if you are an owner, founder, co-founder, or partner in a small business.Then it says,As an Integrator, this is the right book for you if you have all of the characteristics of a strong second-in-command …[or] you are sitting in the #2 seat in an organization.What if I'm an Integrator who's the owner and founder? The book talks about being a Visionary forced to play the Integrator role, but not vice versa. Chapter 6, "Finding Each Other," says,while Integrators don't go out to hire their own Visionary, we do have some guidelines for Integrators 'at large' and Integrators in the making, many of whom are currently tucked away somewhere inside large corporations or small companies. … We will show you how to find a great Visionary match and help them build a great company.As I said earlier, it's not applicable to my situation. And I know I'm not the only Integrator who's the owner or founder of a business; many technical people are in the same position. I didn't find this book nearly as insightful or helpful as Traction. I read this because I'm evaluating how I run my website maintenance company, OptimWise. Notes The Relationship Visionary/Integrator Assessments "The polar differences between Visionaries and Integrators means they are always driving each other a little bit crazy." Visionary Spectrum: the more each of these are true, the more Visionary innovation you need: Speed of industry change Growth aspirations Degree of market change, complexity, competition

  2. 5 out of 5

    John Blackman

    This book delivers a pretty ordinary message that could be covered in much less material. It is essentially visionary + implementer = success. It's almost self evident. I guess my expectations were high for this book and I just don't feel like I got much out of it. It asks some questions to see if you fall into the visionary or implementer bucket at which point you identify with one of the two. According to this book visionaries outnumber implementers 4:1. Go figure, there are 4x as many people w This book delivers a pretty ordinary message that could be covered in much less material. It is essentially visionary + implementer = success. It's almost self evident. I guess my expectations were high for this book and I just don't feel like I got much out of it. It asks some questions to see if you fall into the visionary or implementer bucket at which point you identify with one of the two. According to this book visionaries outnumber implementers 4:1. Go figure, there are 4x as many people who can come up with an idea compared to those who can actually build it. To me the role of the visionary in the book came across a little weak, almost as the idea guy who writes something down on a napkin and wants $1MM to hand it over to someone who can go build it. The visionary needs someone who can actually build something so they can go on to think of new ideas and be 'freed up' from that pesky work stuff. I would have liked to have seen a greater emphasis on sales and marketing for the visionary role. Perhaps that is something to be handed off too. You too can have amazing results and the time you've always deserved if you find someone to go do the work while you just come up with the ideas. They better be good ones.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gina Bégin

    Presents some interesting ideas and things I definitely see value in -- uh -- *integrating* into my organization but didn't feel altogether deep on the tactical; more of a praise of each role's qualities and their combination in the workplace. There was definitely some instruction on putting this to work in a business, just felt more skewed to explaining the virtues and setbacks that the people in the two roles face, both internally and in their positions. Presents some interesting ideas and things I definitely see value in -- uh -- *integrating* into my organization but didn't feel altogether deep on the tactical; more of a praise of each role's qualities and their combination in the workplace. There was definitely some instruction on putting this to work in a business, just felt more skewed to explaining the virtues and setbacks that the people in the two roles face, both internally and in their positions.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ron Barker

    Read the first 90 pages then skimmed the last 80. Pretty easy read and the concepts are solid but most build on the book Traction thus was able to skim last half of book. I did not think using the examples of early 20th century , like Disney, Ford, Apple of Standard Oil were very effective.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    both WHY and HOW are important, matching both will make us reaching dream faster

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Stevens

    Wonderful book for anyone ready to take their business to the next level. Highly recommend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Silva

    14/52 Another book about EOS (Traction) but specific to the visionary and integrator functions within the organization. I think Gino has combined lots of good ideas and tries to repackage them, but isn't the best writer, so both this and Traction are dry and boring to read or listen to. The underlying lesson in this book is that being a visionary is unique and for most people means you are going to be pretty bad at a lot of stuff. Being an integrator means you are pretty rare and aren't going to b 14/52 Another book about EOS (Traction) but specific to the visionary and integrator functions within the organization. I think Gino has combined lots of good ideas and tries to repackage them, but isn't the best writer, so both this and Traction are dry and boring to read or listen to. The underlying lesson in this book is that being a visionary is unique and for most people means you are going to be pretty bad at a lot of stuff. Being an integrator means you are pretty rare and aren't going to be the star of the show, but are really really needed. I feel like the whole book is written kind of like a horoscope and wants to play off the personalities of people who want to see themselves as visionaries or integrators becasue it makes them different than 90+% of the population. It's not that I don't believe some people are better suited for specific roles in life, just that this book specifically wants people to believe they are one of those two things.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Juan Chavez

    Great book! It came at a great time in my life. The only reason i would rate it a 4 star and not a 5 star is because I thought it was a little longer than needed. But overall, it provided alot of clarity for me. I was able to see the differences in roles. I wonder if most people see themselves as visionaries because we lack follow through. The devil is in the details and the magic happens in the small details. Although I see myself as a visionary I know that I need to get better at the details. Great book! It came at a great time in my life. The only reason i would rate it a 4 star and not a 5 star is because I thought it was a little longer than needed. But overall, it provided alot of clarity for me. I was able to see the differences in roles. I wonder if most people see themselves as visionaries because we lack follow through. The devil is in the details and the magic happens in the small details. Although I see myself as a visionary I know that I need to get better at the details. I do think I would work really well with a great integrator though. Maybe I need to mold my integrator.. Gold. “Don’t mistake activity for productivity. Creativity is productivity—it just doesn’t feel like it at first.” “Integrator.” One sees the future, and the other makes it happen.” “As an example, the Visionary function’s five roles might be as follows (these are the most common): • New ideas/R&D • Creative problem solving • Major external relationships • Culture • Selling big deals The Integrator function’s five roles might be as follows (these are the most common): • Leading, Managing, and holding people Accountable (LMA) • Executing the business plan/P&L results • Integrating the other major functions • Resolving cross-functional issues • Communication across the organization”

  9. 5 out of 5

    Peter Keller

    Just finished Rocket Fuel. The book is essentially about how wildly successful companies are led and run by a team- a Visionary and a Integrator. The Visionary is the “big picture person” and the Integrator is the “rubber meets the road / make shit happen” person. Rocket Fuel fleshes out who these people are, what they do for a company, how to find each other, and how to work together. My takeaways I need an Integrator. I fit the “Visionary” profile quite well, but I have not been good at hiring a Just finished Rocket Fuel. The book is essentially about how wildly successful companies are led and run by a team- a Visionary and a Integrator. The Visionary is the “big picture person” and the Integrator is the “rubber meets the road / make shit happen” person. Rocket Fuel fleshes out who these people are, what they do for a company, how to find each other, and how to work together. My takeaways I need an Integrator. I fit the “Visionary” profile quite well, but I have not been good at hiring and managing Integrators. I need to change up our KPI meeting a bit. Use the KPIs as directional, punt talking to later in the meeting. Also use the KPI meeting to create and enforce more weekly accountability. I need to create and publish an org chart with accountability ASAP. This book can help strongly when I am considering who to hire in a Ops Manager/COO integrator role in the future.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark Manderson

    Good read explaining the Visionary and Integrator. The successful businesses that go from small to large I created by a Visionary and integrator. Visionaries are trying to do too much all the time. They have way too many ideas. There is a little bit of crazy that makes them successful. Organizational Whiplash happens when the Visionary leader keeps implementing ideas of the business faster than they can be internalize. This leads to everyone's frustration. The success of a business owner or CEO is h Good read explaining the Visionary and Integrator. The successful businesses that go from small to large I created by a Visionary and integrator. Visionaries are trying to do too much all the time. They have way too many ideas. There is a little bit of crazy that makes them successful. Organizational Whiplash happens when the Visionary leader keeps implementing ideas of the business faster than they can be internalize. This leads to everyone's frustration. The success of a business owner or CEO is how well a company can function once they are gone. Remember you are an employee when you're working in the business. You must Ensure you as well as the leaders are on the same page.  If an employee comes to you to circumvent the supervisor after you listen ask them do you want to tell them or am I going to tell them? Clearly communicate what success looks like.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Quinn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is one of those where you can skip a lot and the book becomes a five. I'll give you the gist in just a few sentences. It takes two kinds of people to make a business work really well. One is the innovator, the idea's person, the one with the vision. The other is the implementor. They are really good a setting priorities, implementing the vision, figuring out how the innovator's ideas work in the business. You are predominantly one or the other and the best way for you to move forward in you This is one of those where you can skip a lot and the book becomes a five. I'll give you the gist in just a few sentences. It takes two kinds of people to make a business work really well. One is the innovator, the idea's person, the one with the vision. The other is the implementor. They are really good a setting priorities, implementing the vision, figuring out how the innovator's ideas work in the business. You are predominantly one or the other and the best way for you to move forward in your business or job is to find the other type of person and latch on like a leach.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Simpson

    This is a quick, easy to read book that added the categories of visionary and integrator to my lexicon. I've often thought of people being categorized according to personality types and different strengths having different benefits to different roles. This book labels the two types of people needed to work together to effectively run a business and simplifies business challenges that often plague people for years. Grateful for this recommendation and new way of thinking about managing an organiz This is a quick, easy to read book that added the categories of visionary and integrator to my lexicon. I've often thought of people being categorized according to personality types and different strengths having different benefits to different roles. This book labels the two types of people needed to work together to effectively run a business and simplifies business challenges that often plague people for years. Grateful for this recommendation and new way of thinking about managing an organization.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

    This is a companion book to "Traction" by Gino Wickman, and essentially delves deeper into how to set up the Visionary and Integrator relationship that will propel the ideas in Traction forward. There is some overlap/review of concepts from Traction, and I can see this being used as a way to convey the need for these two roles to others in the organization - especially if you are the Visionary who needs to illustrate this to the person who you see as your Integrator, or vice versa. It will also This is a companion book to "Traction" by Gino Wickman, and essentially delves deeper into how to set up the Visionary and Integrator relationship that will propel the ideas in Traction forward. There is some overlap/review of concepts from Traction, and I can see this being used as a way to convey the need for these two roles to others in the organization - especially if you are the Visionary who needs to illustrate this to the person who you see as your Integrator, or vice versa. It will also serve well as a workbook to use while you put this V/I relationship in place.

  14. 5 out of 5

    sue paul

    Spoke to me This book helped define me. I always new I thought differently and could see things other people couldn't (somewhat a source of frustration). Also, I know I did not like going into the weeds to implement my visions. Although I do, it requires a significant amount of energy. This book introduced me to the visionary integrator concept which I can see way more clearly. I also have hope that work does not have to be this hard with the right partners. It also helped me see my husband (inte Spoke to me This book helped define me. I always new I thought differently and could see things other people couldn't (somewhat a source of frustration). Also, I know I did not like going into the weeds to implement my visions. Although I do, it requires a significant amount of energy. This book introduced me to the visionary integrator concept which I can see way more clearly. I also have hope that work does not have to be this hard with the right partners. It also helped me see my husband (integrator) in a new light versus just being my dreamkiller. 😁

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vaughan

    I've worked with lots of businesses and organisations that could benefit from the approach prescribed in this book. Executives and founders who can't get traction on their grand plan ad their downstream managers who don't have clear boundaries of authority so don't make traction - let alone try to optimise their progress. This book describes two main roles the Visionary and the Integrator who clearly split the key tasks to guide company growth. It provides actionale items for how these two roles I've worked with lots of businesses and organisations that could benefit from the approach prescribed in this book. Executives and founders who can't get traction on their grand plan ad their downstream managers who don't have clear boundaries of authority so don't make traction - let alone try to optimise their progress. This book describes two main roles the Visionary and the Integrator who clearly split the key tasks to guide company growth. It provides actionale items for how these two roles will operate - both with each other, and with the rest of the leadership team.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mary-anne Gillespie

    Downloaded it on audio book and the first couple chapters got right to the point and were great. Visionary and Integrator....totally good points for clarity on how every company needs them. The rest of the book lagged and dragged and kept going over and over the same point. Having been coached by strategic coaching I appreciated the concept behind unique abilities and the book was a nice reminder that just seemed to lack that "oh wow" factor. Downloaded it on audio book and the first couple chapters got right to the point and were great. Visionary and Integrator....totally good points for clarity on how every company needs them. The rest of the book lagged and dragged and kept going over and over the same point. Having been coached by strategic coaching I appreciated the concept behind unique abilities and the book was a nice reminder that just seemed to lack that "oh wow" factor.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dale Davies

    Great book for those who are trying to determine where fit into the jigsaw of business life. Are you a Visionary or Integrator? To you dream of big ideas (Visionary) or someone who turns dreams into reality (Integrator)? I'd recommend all entrepreneurs, business owners, C-level, and leadership-level employees read this, but also those outside of the "management" pyramid who are trying to determine where their place in the puzzle is. Great book for those who are trying to determine where fit into the jigsaw of business life. Are you a Visionary or Integrator? To you dream of big ideas (Visionary) or someone who turns dreams into reality (Integrator)? I'd recommend all entrepreneurs, business owners, C-level, and leadership-level employees read this, but also those outside of the "management" pyramid who are trying to determine where their place in the puzzle is.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adam Housley

    While I read Traction first, Rocket Fuel is a book I wish I'd read 20 years ago! I truly appreciate Wickman's practicality and simplicity. He wastes no time and minces no words! The book is a great balance philosophy and practicality. He first explains what he believes a business needs to be successful and why, then he provides tools to bring theory to reality. While I read Traction first, Rocket Fuel is a book I wish I'd read 20 years ago! I truly appreciate Wickman's practicality and simplicity. He wastes no time and minces no words! The book is a great balance philosophy and practicality. He first explains what he believes a business needs to be successful and why, then he provides tools to bring theory to reality.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bill Davis

    Excellent Concept and Straight to the Point! I really enjoyed Gino Wickman’s other book Traction and this one was also excellent. The Visionary Integrator relationship is very interesting and I am looking forward to integrating it into my business. And unlike many other business books it does not belabor the point or take forever to get to the main concept. Highly recommend it!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Wentland

    Game Changer At its core it’s a simple concept but if your one of the many visionaries wondering why you can’t get it all done it’s because you can’t. You need somebody else, somebody who’s good at the day-to-day, the details, making things repeat. This book really opened my eyes to a way forward in creating a self managing company.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Drew Bennett

    Much in this book that was helpful. As a Visionary-type person, I can see the allure of the organizational structure they are suggesting. It is a dream come true for visionaries. But I'm not sure how do-able it is in the non-profit world I inhabit. I remain a little cynical that it could work, for example, in a small to medium-sized church. Much in this book that was helpful. As a Visionary-type person, I can see the allure of the organizational structure they are suggesting. It is a dream come true for visionaries. But I'm not sure how do-able it is in the non-profit world I inhabit. I remain a little cynical that it could work, for example, in a small to medium-sized church.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tara L.

    For years I struggled to figure out what wasn’t working in my business. Reading this book helped me to see that I’m a visionary in need of an integrator, or to at least slow down and be one for myself. If you’re struggling to figure out what is missing in your business and why it isn’t growing, this book is for you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    Fantastic book for those running businesses on the importance of the visionary/integrator relationship. It’s a simple concept but one every business leader should know. This is a must read for start-ups and business leaders who feel overwhelmed “in” their business and for those who want to take their business to the next level.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sean Hyde

    Really gave me some clarity on how to fill in my weaknesses with a good partner and/or hire as well as some clarity as to some issues I've had in the past with the same. Definitely worth a read if you are trying to really drive growth in an organization, particularly if you are a founder finding yourself a bit stuck. Really gave me some clarity on how to fill in my weaknesses with a good partner and/or hire as well as some clarity as to some issues I've had in the past with the same. Definitely worth a read if you are trying to really drive growth in an organization, particularly if you are a founder finding yourself a bit stuck.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Toe-Knee Nguyen

    A must for all entrepreneurs! Highly recommended for all entrepreneurs who want to take their businesses to the next level. It's important to have a clear understanding of the dynamics behind the Visionary and Integrator. Great read!!! A must for all entrepreneurs! Highly recommended for all entrepreneurs who want to take their businesses to the next level. It's important to have a clear understanding of the dynamics behind the Visionary and Integrator. Great read!!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jay Buys

    I liked this book but I'm not sure it was 100% necessary since I read Traction just a month or so before this. This expands on some key concepts from Traction and if you're really struggling with the Visionary/Integrator concepts then check this out. Otherwise you can probably pass. I liked this book but I'm not sure it was 100% necessary since I read Traction just a month or so before this. This expands on some key concepts from Traction and if you're really struggling with the Visionary/Integrator concepts then check this out. Otherwise you can probably pass.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ben Solomon

    An experience that helped me understand why I was struggling. The whole notion of Visionary and Integrator helps understand why in a lot of cases, businesses are started by 2 or more people who compliment each other, to envision, create and distribute the value.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jef

    This book appealed to the Visionary in me! It helped to give the high level with enough detail and questions to dig deeper if a person wanted to. There are some actionable quizzes and strategy questions however this one will look mostly at the theory behind the integrator vs. the visionary.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    I wish I could give this business book 4.5 stars. I really enjoyed it and as an integrator/operator it was nice to understand what my skill set brings to the table. Plus, the tools to grow a small business are easy to apply.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book was suggested to me because of my work style, but because I'm not in a #1 or #2 spot in a business and don't really aspire to be, I didn't feel like it really applied. Still, it had some interesting points. This book was suggested to me because of my work style, but because I'm not in a #1 or #2 spot in a business and don't really aspire to be, I didn't feel like it really applied. Still, it had some interesting points.

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