website statistics Between Two Worlds: The Inner Lives of Children of Divorce - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Between Two Worlds: The Inner Lives of Children of Divorce

Availability: Ready to download

Is there really such a thing as a “good divorce”? Determined to uncover the truth, Elizabeth Marquardt—herself a child of divorce—conducted, with Professor Norval Glenn, a pioneering national study of children of divorce, surveying 1,500 young adults from both divorced and intact families between 2001 and 2003. In Between Two Worlds, she weaves the findings of that study t Is there really such a thing as a “good divorce”? Determined to uncover the truth, Elizabeth Marquardt—herself a child of divorce—conducted, with Professor Norval Glenn, a pioneering national study of children of divorce, surveying 1,500 young adults from both divorced and intact families between 2001 and 2003. In Between Two Worlds, she weaves the findings of that study together with powerful, unsentimental stories of the childhoods of young people from divorced families. The hard truth, she says, is that while divorce is sometimes necessary, even amicable divorces sow lasting inner conflict in the lives of children. When a family breaks in two, children who stay in touch with both parents must travel between two worlds, trying alone to reconcile their parents’ often strikingly different beliefs, values, and ways of living. Authoritative, beautifully written, and alive with the voices of men and women whose lives were changed by divorce, Marquardt’s book is essential reading for anyone who grew up “between two worlds.” “Makes a persuasive case against the culture of casual divorce.” —Washington Post “A poignant narrative of her own experience . . . Marquardt says she and other young adults who grew up in the divorce explosion of the 1970s and 1980s are still dealing with wounds that they could never talk about with their parents.”—Chicago Tribune


Compare

Is there really such a thing as a “good divorce”? Determined to uncover the truth, Elizabeth Marquardt—herself a child of divorce—conducted, with Professor Norval Glenn, a pioneering national study of children of divorce, surveying 1,500 young adults from both divorced and intact families between 2001 and 2003. In Between Two Worlds, she weaves the findings of that study t Is there really such a thing as a “good divorce”? Determined to uncover the truth, Elizabeth Marquardt—herself a child of divorce—conducted, with Professor Norval Glenn, a pioneering national study of children of divorce, surveying 1,500 young adults from both divorced and intact families between 2001 and 2003. In Between Two Worlds, she weaves the findings of that study together with powerful, unsentimental stories of the childhoods of young people from divorced families. The hard truth, she says, is that while divorce is sometimes necessary, even amicable divorces sow lasting inner conflict in the lives of children. When a family breaks in two, children who stay in touch with both parents must travel between two worlds, trying alone to reconcile their parents’ often strikingly different beliefs, values, and ways of living. Authoritative, beautifully written, and alive with the voices of men and women whose lives were changed by divorce, Marquardt’s book is essential reading for anyone who grew up “between two worlds.” “Makes a persuasive case against the culture of casual divorce.” —Washington Post “A poignant narrative of her own experience . . . Marquardt says she and other young adults who grew up in the divorce explosion of the 1970s and 1980s are still dealing with wounds that they could never talk about with their parents.”—Chicago Tribune

30 review for Between Two Worlds: The Inner Lives of Children of Divorce

  1. 5 out of 5

    Feijoa

    I should hate this book. It’s funded by a cabal of American Christian anti-divorce ‘theorists’. It champions marriage (explicitly NOT facto partnerships) and crusades against the evils of family breakdown and secularisation. It makes my feminist bone itch. Also, the cover could not be more redolent with 'self help' if it tried. GAHHH! THESE ARE NOT MY KIND OF BOOKS. And yet……I loved this book and wish I’d read it 30 years ago (it was only written in 2005). The book summarises a four year researc I should hate this book. It’s funded by a cabal of American Christian anti-divorce ‘theorists’. It champions marriage (explicitly NOT facto partnerships) and crusades against the evils of family breakdown and secularisation. It makes my feminist bone itch. Also, the cover could not be more redolent with 'self help' if it tried. GAHHH! THESE ARE NOT MY KIND OF BOOKS. And yet……I loved this book and wish I’d read it 30 years ago (it was only written in 2005). The book summarises a four year research project in which 1500 respondents answered a questionnaire and 70 participated in in-depth interviews. The methodological problems are visible from space - the summary of interview data is an abject exercise in selection bias - there are too many instances to mention. (The researcher/author is herself heavily biased, but this is less of a problem for me; social research is always biased and always reflects its author/s, to a greater or lesser extent. Making these biases explicit makes for more honest research). One example - the author talks about how differences between parents are exaggerated after a marriage breakdown, because there’s no longer any reason to ameliorate them within the marriage. Yet, it could just as easily be argued that those who broke up were in fact more different than those who remained together, and that’s why they broke up. Numerous logical problems like this emerge throughout the book. The author begins by telling us that there is a dearth of research into the lived experiences of children of divorce. What literature does exist is dominated by ‘the good divorce’ - one in which the parents separate nicely and manage to share custody of the children without fighting. What is completely overlooked is the reality; children of divorce live in two worlds regardless of acrimony or lack thereof. Importantly, children move from the centre of home life to the periphery. That might sound weird to someone who hasn’t experienced it, but to a kid of divorce it makes sense. This books tells us that kids who live in two worlds become adept and astute liars - they live two realities, their identity comprised of two distinct, antagonistic parts, diametrically opposed. Lying is part of their identity. I particularly liked that the author had chosen to look at successful adult children of divorce (she chose having a college degree as a rough selection criteria). The only other accounts of children of divorce are always sensationalist moralising things about how we were all doomed to a lifelong travail of drug-addled sluttery. I always felt insulted that my future should be proscribed in such terms. But this book focused more on the divorced childhood as a cultural artefact. What does it mean for identity? What does it mean in terms of family expectations and structure? These are more subtle impacts but they’re nonetheless significant. As a child I found my parents’ divorce difficult and heartbreaking, but it was made clear to me that my feelings were ridiculous, and to be upset about such a thing was a failure on my part - I was too sensitive, weak, fragile, or, most damningly, possibly a bit like my father/mother. I think the thing I appreciated about this book was simply that it acknowledged my reality, which was something I’d not experienced before. As kids we were never asked about how we felt about our situation, and this is something the author talks about a lot. The reason, of course, is that no-one wants to hear it. More broadly, divorce was becoming increasingly common at that time, and according to all the adults, it was totally fine. I’ve never talked about it since, either, I simply assumed no-one would be interested and any impacts would be mine to deal with alone. Once, when I was in my early 20s a friend’s mother said it was sad that I came from a ‘broken home’. I was offended, I assumed she meant all those derogatory assumptions that I’d been told too - my beckoning life of crime etc.,. but in fact she was just being kind and I strongly remember it for that reason. It was weirdly comforting to have someone acknowledge that it might have been something with consequences. No-one had ever done that before. This book was astonishing to me, because it suddenly put something I’d been troubled by so clearly into words. Some of the interview excerpts were striking - I would have said exactly the same thing if asked the same question. It was borderline spooky but also very comforting. For instance, the author describes children trying not to resemble their ‘other’ parent. I remember attempting to work out which mannerisms would give me away as belonging to one parent or the other, and trying to adopt the mannerisms of my stepmother, but I’d never even put that into words. The book also perfectly describes that feeling of having no real home, of feeling like a permanent visitor. My Mum and Dad both remarried and started new lives, peripheralising us in the process - this book put that into words too. And then there’s the section on how children of divorce grow up much faster than their contemporaries because they’re learning how to develop this bifurcated identity while also negotiating their parents’ feelings. I also appreciated how the author said that most children did not fantasise about their parents getting back together. I always thought that was a weird myth - you grow up fast when your parents separate, there’s not much in the way of childhood dreaming going on afterwards. Reviews of this book often criticise it for its tone of score-settling, but for me, that was refreshing. My generation, the first generation to experience widespread divorce were explicitly told that divorce is a good thing, and that as long as our parents could get along our lives would be just fine. The author states rather pithily that adults would never accept the conditions children are expected to go along with (living in two separate homes, accepting new family members while keeping secret about both halves of their lives). To be sure, the author’s rage is still smoking but I was so relieved to finally see a clear-eyed acknowledgement of what divorce is really like for many children. It made me feel like my experience wasn’t my fault, as had always been inferred. Rather, my feelings and reactions were pretty normal. The religiosity in this book was jarring but I think that’s because it’s American, and I expect many of the survey questions wouldn’t seem out of place to US based respondents. Basically, there was a lot of talk about how children of divorce navigated religious questions, and I expect this is simply part of the public domain in a US context, more so than my cultural background anyway. I basically skimmed that chapter as it did not feel relevant. The book is pretty clearly anti-divorce (although acknowledges that children are often better off than in a high conflict marriage) and it’s got shameless religious overtones, but they’re not hidden, and it doesn’t detract from the content. It also doesn’t offer solutions, and that’s nice. For me it was enough to have someone say the equivalent of ‘I see you’ and also, ‘you’re not actually a freak’. I'd recommend this to any child of divorce. It's not weepy therapy book, more a cartography of a relatively new way of being a (western) child.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

    As a divorce lawyer, I highly recommend this book. It contains no happy talk, only the truth about the pain and problems that the children of divorce experience. Nuff said.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    This is one of the best books I've ever read on the effects of divorce on children and teens. The premise is that as the divorcing parents pursue their separate lives, the children increasingly find themselves caught in a no man;s land between the two worlds of their parents, where they are left to figure out their morals and values in a vacuum. The key element to this book is an extensive survey of children of divorce that was done to get their thoughts and feelings on the experience, coupled w This is one of the best books I've ever read on the effects of divorce on children and teens. The premise is that as the divorcing parents pursue their separate lives, the children increasingly find themselves caught in a no man;s land between the two worlds of their parents, where they are left to figure out their morals and values in a vacuum. The key element to this book is an extensive survey of children of divorce that was done to get their thoughts and feelings on the experience, coupled with dozens of longer interviews done with children of divorce. This book gives voice to those who are often voiceless in a divorce. One of Marquardt's more provocative points is concerning what she calls the myth of the "good divorce." She examines the arguments that children are resilient and will get through the trauma of divorce unscathed after a couple of years of upheaval and dismisses the notions as "happy talk" designed to soothe the consciences of adults. She argues that while a good divorce is better than a bad divorce, it is not better than a good marriage. Anyone who works with children and teens and wants to gain a better understanding of a phenomenon that is greatly affecting almost half of our children in will need to read this book and hear their voice.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie Biles

    "There is no such thing as a good divorce" and "Children are resilient because we need them to be." These are two repeated themes in this excellent compilation of stories collected by this sociologist. As a teacher, reading this work has helped me understand a growing majority of vulnerable, not so resilient children who fill my classroom. Marquardt's thesis, with which I must agree, divorce is devastating to children, regardless of the circumstances. "There is no such thing as a good divorce" and "Children are resilient because we need them to be." These are two repeated themes in this excellent compilation of stories collected by this sociologist. As a teacher, reading this work has helped me understand a growing majority of vulnerable, not so resilient children who fill my classroom. Marquardt's thesis, with which I must agree, divorce is devastating to children, regardless of the circumstances.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    Spoiler alert: There is no such thing as a good divorce if it's your parents who are divorcing. Spoiler alert: There is no such thing as a good divorce if it's your parents who are divorcing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    The book claims to be a study about children of divorce who come from "good divorces," however, overwhelmingly it appears to be about this woman's life with a study she conducted to back up her own feelings of confusion, imbalance, etc. I think it would be fair to say that the author already had the conclusion of her study written (and perhaps this whole book) before the study was even started. It doesn't mean that what she says is wrong, but it does make the stated intent of this book inaccurat The book claims to be a study about children of divorce who come from "good divorces," however, overwhelmingly it appears to be about this woman's life with a study she conducted to back up her own feelings of confusion, imbalance, etc. I think it would be fair to say that the author already had the conclusion of her study written (and perhaps this whole book) before the study was even started. It doesn't mean that what she says is wrong, but it does make the stated intent of this book inaccurate. To illustrate how biased the author is, based on her conclusions of "good divorces" you could surmise that it would be better for your spouse to die than to divorce him/her. If you go back over all of her reasoning, you'll notice they are all solved by becoming a widow. For instance, a child of a "good divorce" will feel: Expecting to keep secrets from their parents: solved by being a widow Feel like a different person with each of their parents: solved by being a widow Moral questions early in life: solved by being a widow Feeling like a football being hurtled between parents: solved by being a widow Trying to make sense of two different ways of living: solved by being a widow Family income to plummet: solved by being a widow who had a good life insurance policy. Difficulty interacting with two people who are separate: solved by being a widow Two different places: solved Two different ideas: solved Even the title of the book, "Between Two Worlds," again, all solved by being a widow. In her defense, after 180+ pages in a paragraph during the conclusion, she did address the hole in her research (although not framing it that way) by saying: "For now, I suspect that on average it is no better, and probably much worse, for children of divorce to lose contact completely with a parent - often the father." So interesting topic, but the author is far too close to the issue to conduct a scientific study that is not filled with bias, as even her summary data illustrates (if you look at her data tables they overwhelmingly do not show the strong emphasis or correlation that she uses in her wording). You learn later in the book that she experienced three different divorces as a child, and that in one of them, the step-dad, whom she grew close to, committed suicide. I felt that this death really scarred her, and that she felt that if her parents had never originally divorced that she would have never been exposed to an adult who was playing the role of a parent, but was not completely responsible for her; feeling that this loss was far more catastrophic to her than her biological parents divorcing, I wonder if this book would have been written if he would have survived. Either way, I'm glad it was written, but more research from less biased people will hopefully contribute to this genre in the future.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jenni Frencham

    I found this book by visiting the blog of Lauren Winner, an author I have recently discovered. She had chosen to read this book because she said she saw herself on every page. Although I generally avoid the victim mentality that often comes from reading books about how traumas in a person's life have warped that person so he or she cannot choose to behave differently, I was intrigued by this particular book. This book is the culmination of a study of children who both came from divorced families I found this book by visiting the blog of Lauren Winner, an author I have recently discovered. She had chosen to read this book because she said she saw herself on every page. Although I generally avoid the victim mentality that often comes from reading books about how traumas in a person's life have warped that person so he or she cannot choose to behave differently, I was intrigued by this particular book. This book is the culmination of a study of children who both came from divorced families and completed at least one college degree. The author's hypothesis was that such children would generally be considered successful by the world around them, yet she wanted to see how growing up in a divorced home changed the way children think and feel and approach the world.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Farah

    This book sets out to challenge some of the myths surrounding a "good divorce." Even if the parents move on and create new lives for themselves that are happy and positive, the divorce still has an impact on the kids that most people don't want to admit. She talks about how children of divorce are forced to become "little adults" and how they don't have a unified sense of home. Because they travel between two homes, these kids have to keep their guard up and always watch to see what the rules ar This book sets out to challenge some of the myths surrounding a "good divorce." Even if the parents move on and create new lives for themselves that are happy and positive, the divorce still has an impact on the kids that most people don't want to admit. She talks about how children of divorce are forced to become "little adults" and how they don't have a unified sense of home. Because they travel between two homes, these kids have to keep their guard up and always watch to see what the rules are at Mom's and how things are different at Dad's house. It was an interesting critique on all of the "happy divorce talk."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Blaze Pearson

    This is a great book!! My parents divorced when I was barely a year old and I felt like this book was telling my story and helping me to put my emotions into words. I also have two older siblings that went through the same family split but felt it from a different angle and I feel as though Elizabeth Marquardt nailed what they went through as well. Before I read this book I thought my problems were exclusive to me but as I read this book it was clear that I was not alone. As cheesy as that sound This is a great book!! My parents divorced when I was barely a year old and I felt like this book was telling my story and helping me to put my emotions into words. I also have two older siblings that went through the same family split but felt it from a different angle and I feel as though Elizabeth Marquardt nailed what they went through as well. Before I read this book I thought my problems were exclusive to me but as I read this book it was clear that I was not alone. As cheesy as that sounds it completely changed my life. I highly recommend this book to anyone that is married, thinking of divorce, going through a divorce, a parent that is divorced or a child of divorce.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alanna

    This book is so important. Honestly, I think it should be made into mandatory reading for any divorcing/separating parents. Elizabeth Marquardt breathes life into the silent experiences of all children of divorce as she attempts to shatter our complacent view of divorce and it's effect on children. As both a child of divorce and a single parent, this book was especially poignant. This book gives light to an experience that I myself have faced but never been able to put into words. There was passa This book is so important. Honestly, I think it should be made into mandatory reading for any divorcing/separating parents. Elizabeth Marquardt breathes life into the silent experiences of all children of divorce as she attempts to shatter our complacent view of divorce and it's effect on children. As both a child of divorce and a single parent, this book was especially poignant. This book gives light to an experience that I myself have faced but never been able to put into words. There was passages that I would read and think, "Holy shit, that's a scene right out of my life," the stories were so eerily similar.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Silverman

    I remember why I initially liked this this, and now why I'm mixed. Let me start by saying this can be an important book for someone trying to understand that they are not alone. That the experiences they had as a child of divorce may be more shared than unique. When I first read this, as my initial exposure to the thoughts of those who went through a divorce, I found it extremely enlightening. As a psychologist, understanding another's place, history, experience is very important. Not being a ch I remember why I initially liked this this, and now why I'm mixed. Let me start by saying this can be an important book for someone trying to understand that they are not alone. That the experiences they had as a child of divorce may be more shared than unique. When I first read this, as my initial exposure to the thoughts of those who went through a divorce, I found it extremely enlightening. As a psychologist, understanding another's place, history, experience is very important. Not being a child of divorce, these aspects were new to me. They are indeed important. As an academic, I found the book problematic. The experiences detailed are anecdotal. The reported study, while large, was more sociological than scientific. As a scientist, I feel this should have been more thoroughly explained - in some ways, it may be misleading to the lay reader. That said, I published a book in 2007, which is admittedly anecdotal. My book suffers from some of the same problems. The author touches on some very important aspects of marriage and modeling. That any relationship is a negotiation. That a marriage is essentially an attempt by two people to create something more than its individual parts - two strands of wool slowing knitted into a blanket which can provide comfort, warmth and security. More importantly, that even a "good" divorce results in a tearing of this fabric. For the child or adult of a divorce, this can be an enlightening read. I think for the early clinician, this book is also extremely valuable. However, maybe the best audience is the newly married - for Marquardt describes quite nicely what a good marriage does, and what a conflictual marriage may do.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This is the first book I’ve read that helped explains the components of my childhood that just didn’t fully make sense to me. Ms Marquardt’s research and the impact of a child that volleys between two homes is eye opening. Both of my parents were an active part of my life, they just each had their own lives that I was partially in throughout my childhood. I couldn’t have imagined having been raised differently, the info in this book just helped me understand why I question certain this more now This is the first book I’ve read that helped explains the components of my childhood that just didn’t fully make sense to me. Ms Marquardt’s research and the impact of a child that volleys between two homes is eye opening. Both of my parents were an active part of my life, they just each had their own lives that I was partially in throughout my childhood. I couldn’t have imagined having been raised differently, the info in this book just helped me understand why I question certain this more now as an adult who has been married myself for over 20 years.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ann Garth

    This book gets it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kirsti

    Interesting and sensitively written book that showcases the author's research on children of divorce. Marquardt points out that there has been almost no research on the spiritual development of children whose parents have split up. Based on her study, those children interpret religious imagery very differently than children from intact families do. The notion of God as a parent affects them in a different way--some say, "Great, a father who is with me everywhere I go and whom I can always talk t Interesting and sensitively written book that showcases the author's research on children of divorce. Marquardt points out that there has been almost no research on the spiritual development of children whose parents have split up. Based on her study, those children interpret religious imagery very differently than children from intact families do. The notion of God as a parent affects them in a different way--some say, "Great, a father who is with me everywhere I go and whom I can always talk to," while others say, "Thanks, but I already have a mysterious, faraway father who ignores me." Children of divorce also struggle with moral questions much earlier than most children——Why did this happen to me? How come Mom has one truth and Dad has another? Am I a different person with Mom than I am with Dad, or do I just feel different? Is it disloyal to act like (or sound like, or look like) one parent when I am with the other? The author describes many of her own experiences as a child who suffered through her parents' divorces and remarriages. She believes that she became a fundamentalist Christian as a teenager for the same reasons that other teenage girls develop eating disorders--to control the body and numb the mind. Marquardt has little good to say about society's idea of a "good divorce" and hates the term "blended family." (She says "divided family" would be more accurate, and she has a point.)

  15. 5 out of 5

    The American Conservative

    'Based on a random survey of 1,500 women and men aged 18-35, as well as 70 in-depth interviews within that group, Marquardt and co-researcher Norval Glenn have delivered an empirical record that makes the appendices alone reason enough to study this book. In them one finds the fascinating differences of this random sample of young adults—half from divorced families and half from intact—manifest themselves repeatedly in the course of 125 probing survey questions. Even so, the significance of this 'Based on a random survey of 1,500 women and men aged 18-35, as well as 70 in-depth interviews within that group, Marquardt and co-researcher Norval Glenn have delivered an empirical record that makes the appendices alone reason enough to study this book. In them one finds the fascinating differences of this random sample of young adults—half from divorced families and half from intact—manifest themselves repeatedly in the course of 125 probing survey questions. Even so, the significance of this book goes deeper than its empirical contribution. In a bold move that will doubtless launch a thousand complaining missives from her fellow sociologists, Marquardt frames her discussion of these results in the first person, weaving her own personal story as a child of divorced parents in and out of the text. The polemical result ranges from effective to devastating. As a result, Between Two Worlds achieves not only a breakthrough in empiricism but also in the quality most lacking elsewhere in current sociology: empathy for the children and former children of these homes.' Read the full review, "Broken Homes, Broken Children," on our website: http://www.theamericanconservative.co...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    While this book has some good insights, I think better, less biased information is available from Judith Wallerstein (namely "Legacy of Divorce" and "What About the Kids"). This book felt a bit resentful, and the topic may be a bit too close to the authors heart to be objective. It's not always as hopeless as this author made it seem. As a stepmom, I appreciated the different perspective but when I tossed around some of the ideas presented in this book to my stepdaughter, she scoffed at them. I While this book has some good insights, I think better, less biased information is available from Judith Wallerstein (namely "Legacy of Divorce" and "What About the Kids"). This book felt a bit resentful, and the topic may be a bit too close to the authors heart to be objective. It's not always as hopeless as this author made it seem. As a stepmom, I appreciated the different perspective but when I tossed around some of the ideas presented in this book to my stepdaughter, she scoffed at them. I think if my husband read this book he'd be inclined to think that he ruined his children for life by agreeing to a divorce. If someone does read this book, I hope it's amongst many others. The literature on divorce and stepfamilies (along with the negativity I often find on stepparent support websites) would make one think there is never a happy ending. But with a lot of work, time and an open mind, life after divorce can be okay. Kids can actually feel that their life is better and that they are happier and have more opportunities and supports. They won't all trot off with lifelong resentment. Not to say it is an easier life or won't take lots of adjusting. But it's not actually as hopeless as this book left me feeling.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mary Anne

    I applaud Elizabeth for speaking on behalf of children who have experienced or will experience the divorce of their parents - especially those who have somewhat regular contact with both parents. This book gave me insights into my own children, and was a solid reminder of the importance of home and family stability for a child. She attempts to remove the "sugar coating" from cultural ideas about "good divorces" and combines empirical data with personal stories (her own and those she interviewed) I applaud Elizabeth for speaking on behalf of children who have experienced or will experience the divorce of their parents - especially those who have somewhat regular contact with both parents. This book gave me insights into my own children, and was a solid reminder of the importance of home and family stability for a child. She attempts to remove the "sugar coating" from cultural ideas about "good divorces" and combines empirical data with personal stories (her own and those she interviewed), weaving a tapestry of truth about the reality of divorce for children. Although she claims the book is for anyone, I believe those who are even slightly considering divorce, and who have children, would benefit most from this book. She seems most concerned with and disturbed by how casual divorce has become, and how adult-centered the choice is, most often leaving children confused, betrayed, and laden with too much responsibility too soon.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    This book should be read by everyone who has an opionion about divorce no matter what their marital status is! There do not seem to be many people who think that divorce even a "good divorce" is a positive event which this book is very clear about but there are still so many misconceptions about children from divorced families that this book helps to clear up. This book also brings up so many issues that are not currently being discused that should be.This is one of the best books I have read. This book should be read by everyone who has an opionion about divorce no matter what their marital status is! There do not seem to be many people who think that divorce even a "good divorce" is a positive event which this book is very clear about but there are still so many misconceptions about children from divorced families that this book helps to clear up. This book also brings up so many issues that are not currently being discused that should be.This is one of the best books I have read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    This is one of the more eye-opening books I have ever read. It's a good read for anyone, not just those who have a broken home. One of the more difficult challenges I face as a single parent is seeing and understanding the perspective my children have. They're not always going to be able to articulate what they're feeling. They're not mature enough to understand the affects that decisions that their mother and I make have on them. So, to have this book to show you many of the truths that are not This is one of the more eye-opening books I have ever read. It's a good read for anyone, not just those who have a broken home. One of the more difficult challenges I face as a single parent is seeing and understanding the perspective my children have. They're not always going to be able to articulate what they're feeling. They're not mature enough to understand the affects that decisions that their mother and I make have on them. So, to have this book to show you many of the truths that are not covered in the "how to do your best to get through it" books is very vital.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Haley Fuoco

    I really did like this book. This book was written by my neighbor Elizabeth Marquart. I was staying at her house with her kids and one night she gave me a copy of her book. We began to talk about what it feels like to have your parents be divorced. It turns out like my parents, her parents are divorced. It was great to talk to her for a few minutes because I feel like I really got to get to know her. Her book is aslo very touching because you feel what it is like from the point of view of childr I really did like this book. This book was written by my neighbor Elizabeth Marquart. I was staying at her house with her kids and one night she gave me a copy of her book. We began to talk about what it feels like to have your parents be divorced. It turns out like my parents, her parents are divorced. It was great to talk to her for a few minutes because I feel like I really got to get to know her. Her book is aslo very touching because you feel what it is like from the point of view of children. I would read this book if you like research books.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    My son read this book and then passed it along to me. Although he said he didn't like it, he did comment that he felt he could relate some of it to his own experience as a child of divorced parents. He didn't remember specifics so I found myself wondering which experiences he related and were relevant to him in his own life. As a divorced parent, this book helped me to recognize, more clearly, the devastation of divorce on children, particularly how, in my own personal case, it effected my two so My son read this book and then passed it along to me. Although he said he didn't like it, he did comment that he felt he could relate some of it to his own experience as a child of divorced parents. He didn't remember specifics so I found myself wondering which experiences he related and were relevant to him in his own life. As a divorced parent, this book helped me to recognize, more clearly, the devastation of divorce on children, particularly how, in my own personal case, it effected my two sons.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Lord

    Marquardt (herself a child of divorce) posed 125 questions to interviewees riffing on one question: "If your parents love you and get along reasonably well, why is their divorce still so wrenching?" Answers and the author's own reflections prove revealing. Find reviews of books for men at Books for Dudes, Books for Dudes, the online reader's advisory column for men from Library Journal. Copyright Library Journal. Marquardt (herself a child of divorce) posed 125 questions to interviewees riffing on one question: "If your parents love you and get along reasonably well, why is their divorce still so wrenching?" Answers and the author's own reflections prove revealing. Find reviews of books for men at Books for Dudes, Books for Dudes, the online reader's advisory column for men from Library Journal. Copyright Library Journal.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kaleigh Oemig

    "Between Two Worlds" is written in the perspective of how children of divorce viewed their lives while growing up. This book is written by Elizabeth Marquardt, who herself is a child of divorce. She Interviews both children from intact and divorced families to show the effects of divorce on children. Her book has a strong argument stating that a “good divorce” doesn’t exist. For children of divorce this book is very relatable and I highly suggest reading it. "Between Two Worlds" is written in the perspective of how children of divorce viewed their lives while growing up. This book is written by Elizabeth Marquardt, who herself is a child of divorce. She Interviews both children from intact and divorced families to show the effects of divorce on children. Her book has a strong argument stating that a “good divorce” doesn’t exist. For children of divorce this book is very relatable and I highly suggest reading it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    An excellent, research driven book on the emotional, moral, and religious development and subsequent issues faced by the children of divorced parents. The appendices in the back give the stats on the questions asked in research, and within the book are excerpts from many different interviews, giving the book a fairly balanced feel. Easy to read and informative.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Very, very depressing book. There were no strategies on how to make things easier for kids to deal with divorce and no hope for parents who are worried about their children going through a divorce. As a (now) single mom who did not want a divorce and fought to keep my marriage together this book did nothing to help me help my daughter.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I was very disappointed in this book. This did not offer advice on how to help children that were "between two worlds." This was basically a reflection on how upset the author was about growing up a child of divorce. The only advice was not to divorce, which does not help a lot of people who have not been given a choice. I was very disappointed in this book. This did not offer advice on how to help children that were "between two worlds." This was basically a reflection on how upset the author was about growing up a child of divorce. The only advice was not to divorce, which does not help a lot of people who have not been given a choice.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I think I'm done with this topic for a bit, so I didn't actually finish this one. Maybe I will later. But still worth the time spent on it--very helpful. I think I'm done with this topic for a bit, so I didn't actually finish this one. Maybe I will later. But still worth the time spent on it--very helpful.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sallie

    If you have friends, family, or kids going through a divorce. Great perspective, almost all of it dead-on.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This book won't change a single mind, but it makes the case well. This book won't change a single mind, but it makes the case well.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Morgenfry

    If you are divorced or thinking about getting divorced-read this book. It might change your perspective on how it will impact your kids.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...