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Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain for Life

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The bestselling author of Grain Brain uncovers the powerful role of gut bacteria in determining your brain's destiny. Debilitating brain disorders are on the rise-from children diagnosed with autism and ADHD to adults developing dementia at younger ages than ever before. But a medical revolution is underway that can solve this problem: Astonishing new research is revealing The bestselling author of Grain Brain uncovers the powerful role of gut bacteria in determining your brain's destiny. Debilitating brain disorders are on the rise-from children diagnosed with autism and ADHD to adults developing dementia at younger ages than ever before. But a medical revolution is underway that can solve this problem: Astonishing new research is revealing that the health of your brain is, to an extraordinary degree, dictated by the state of your microbiome - the vast population of organisms that live in your body and outnumber your own cells ten to one. What's taking place in your intestines today is determining your risk for any number of brain-related conditions. In BRAIN MAKER, Dr. Perlmutter explains the potent interplay between intestinal microbes and the brain, describing how the microbiome develops from birth and evolves based on lifestyle choices, how it can become "sick," and how nurturing gut health through a few easy strategies can alter your brain's destiny for the better. With simple dietary recommendations and a highly practical program of six steps to improving gut ecology, BRAIN MAKER opens the door to unprecedented brain health potential.


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The bestselling author of Grain Brain uncovers the powerful role of gut bacteria in determining your brain's destiny. Debilitating brain disorders are on the rise-from children diagnosed with autism and ADHD to adults developing dementia at younger ages than ever before. But a medical revolution is underway that can solve this problem: Astonishing new research is revealing The bestselling author of Grain Brain uncovers the powerful role of gut bacteria in determining your brain's destiny. Debilitating brain disorders are on the rise-from children diagnosed with autism and ADHD to adults developing dementia at younger ages than ever before. But a medical revolution is underway that can solve this problem: Astonishing new research is revealing that the health of your brain is, to an extraordinary degree, dictated by the state of your microbiome - the vast population of organisms that live in your body and outnumber your own cells ten to one. What's taking place in your intestines today is determining your risk for any number of brain-related conditions. In BRAIN MAKER, Dr. Perlmutter explains the potent interplay between intestinal microbes and the brain, describing how the microbiome develops from birth and evolves based on lifestyle choices, how it can become "sick," and how nurturing gut health through a few easy strategies can alter your brain's destiny for the better. With simple dietary recommendations and a highly practical program of six steps to improving gut ecology, BRAIN MAKER opens the door to unprecedented brain health potential.

30 review for Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain for Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    It's important to pay attention to the microbiome. Eat kimchi, yogurt, and kefir. There, I just saved you 9 hours. It's important to pay attention to the microbiome. Eat kimchi, yogurt, and kefir. There, I just saved you 9 hours.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie *Eff your feelings*

    The brain and your gut are related. Do: Take probiotics Don't: Take antibiotics for viruses Do: finish all of your antibiotics when you need to take them Don't: Eat too much sugar or corn syrup Do: Eat fermented foods like sour kraut, kimchi, and pickles and like Don't: drink diet soda Do: drink Kombucha and Kefir There. Or you can read the book. Seriously, you'll get more out of the book but that's the gist of it. Ps. Get enough sleep and exercise! The brain and your gut are related. Do: Take probiotics Don't: Take antibiotics for viruses Do: finish all of your antibiotics when you need to take them Don't: Eat too much sugar or corn syrup Do: Eat fermented foods like sour kraut, kimchi, and pickles and like Don't: drink diet soda Do: drink Kombucha and Kefir There. Or you can read the book. Seriously, you'll get more out of the book but that's the gist of it. Ps. Get enough sleep and exercise!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Robertson

    I really liked this book at the beginning, but after about a hundred pages I can't take it anymore. Each chapter is as formulaic and predictable as an episode of House, with as many health miracles and panaceas as a full season of Dr Oz, and as overloaded with "Bob and Susan" stories as 7 Habits. Perhaps my expectations were set too high by the book "Nerve" by Taylor Clark Why I LOVE 'Nerve' . That book presented a desirable combination of personal stories and scientific evidence, and the person I really liked this book at the beginning, but after about a hundred pages I can't take it anymore. Each chapter is as formulaic and predictable as an episode of House, with as many health miracles and panaceas as a full season of Dr Oz, and as overloaded with "Bob and Susan" stories as 7 Habits. Perhaps my expectations were set too high by the book "Nerve" by Taylor Clark Why I LOVE 'Nerve' . That book presented a desirable combination of personal stories and scientific evidence, and the personal stories were much more engaging. The problem was clearly laid out and relatable so by the end of the chapter, the author's insight was easy to receive. Perhaps it was quality over quantity: books like Brain Maker (and books by Dr. Amen) seem to ambush the reader with as many personal stories and clinical trials as possible, as if to hammer home the point that probiotics [or what-have-you] can cure all. I can't help but read each section with skepticism. "Wow, this is so amazing and miraculous, how come we never knew this before?" It doesn't feel balanced, and it feels like a very dense lecture that I didn't know I had signed up for. Honestly, it's just too much information, it's just too dense, it's not convincing and ultimately it's not at all engaging. Read this instead: Taylor Clark Nerve: Poise Under Pressure, Serenity Under Stress, and the Brave New Science of Fear and Cool

  4. 5 out of 5

    David

    This book emphasizes a few very important points, about the importance of our microbiome to our health. The book presents lots of evidence that our microbiome--the microbes in our gut--serve important roles in our overall health and also to our brain health. Some brain dysfunctions may be due to problems with the microbes in our gut. So, the book has some good recommendations for improving our microbiome. Pre-biotics, probiotics, and fermented foods might all useful for this purpose. Even better This book emphasizes a few very important points, about the importance of our microbiome to our health. The book presents lots of evidence that our microbiome--the microbes in our gut--serve important roles in our overall health and also to our brain health. Some brain dysfunctions may be due to problems with the microbes in our gut. So, the book has some good recommendations for improving our microbiome. Pre-biotics, probiotics, and fermented foods might all useful for this purpose. Even better, the book also has some good advice about avoiding sugars and bread, and the benefits from intermittent fasting. It's the last part of the book that completely floored me. Dr. Perlmutter gives lots of ideas about healthy foods. These include steak, corned beef, eggs, butter, salmon, wine, "good fats", ... the list goes on. I am sickened that people believe that this is good nutritional advice. Dr. Perlmutter may be a Fellow of the American College of Nutrition, but this book shows how utterly useless that organization must be. Stay away from this book. There are much better sources of information out there.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chrisl

    Adding link 5/16/2020 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases... Article reinforces my practice of taking supplemental reuteri "When Wilmes and his colleagues tested L. reuteri in this chip, they saw that lactate produced by the microbes traveled through the human gut tissue, indicating that it could enter the bloodstream and potentially travel to the brain." Adding link 4/4/19 - https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases... "Summary: Researchers have demonstrated a causal link between the gut microbiome an Adding link 5/16/2020 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases... Article reinforces my practice of taking supplemental reuteri "When Wilmes and his colleagues tested L. reuteri in this chip, they saw that lactate produced by the microbes traveled through the human gut tissue, indicating that it could enter the bloodstream and potentially travel to the brain." Adding link 4/4/19 - https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases... "Summary: Researchers have demonstrated a causal link between the gut microbiome and the immune system's ability to fight cancer. " Adding link 3/3/19 - https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/02/op... "More than a hundred factors were found to be involved in glycemic response, but notably food wasn’t the key determinant. Instead it was the gut bacteria." *** Adding link 10/2/18 - https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases... quote from link "This is further evidence that consumption of artificial sweeteners adversely affects gut microbial activity which can cause a wide range of health issues." *** Toddler temperament could be influenced by different types of gut bacteria Date: May 27, 2015 Source: Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science Summary: The microbiome of a toddler's gut may influence their behavior, a new study suggests. Scientists found correlations between temperament and the presence of specific types of intestinal bacteria in both girls and boys. The researchers aren't looking for a way to help parents modify the 'terrible twos,' but for clues about how - and where - chronic illnesses like obesity, asthma, allergies and bowel diseases start. * http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/... * Been reading this type research for about 35 years. Mostly library borrowed. Rarely buy one after reading. Will be buying multiple copies of this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    This was a very informative and excellent read, especially for a newbie like I am in the realm of the microbiome. It covers many bases, including: 1)Composition of microbiome and how this affects you. 2)How your bacteria are determined in large part by your birth and early infancy. 3)Effects of diet and environment on your gut. 4)Links to multiple disorders including depression, autism, Tourette syndrome, obesity, neurological disorders, ADHD, and allergies. 5)Probiotics, prebiotics. 6)Types of food a This was a very informative and excellent read, especially for a newbie like I am in the realm of the microbiome. It covers many bases, including: 1)Composition of microbiome and how this affects you. 2)How your bacteria are determined in large part by your birth and early infancy. 3)Effects of diet and environment on your gut. 4)Links to multiple disorders including depression, autism, Tourette syndrome, obesity, neurological disorders, ADHD, and allergies. 5)Probiotics, prebiotics. 6)Types of food and drink you can eat/make. 7)Recipes for many different fermented foods. 8)Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) information. I'm not in agreement with the Doctor regarding limiting meat to 30% of your diet and focusing on vegetables and fiber. He also seems to believe that our past ancestors had access to much more vegetation than what anthropology evidences. He also really pushes: Local food Organic food Grass-fed meat While I totally aspire to the above, much of this is not possible for the population. It is an access issue, money issue or both. Further, the central theme of the Brain Maker book, as well as the former Grain Brain book, was to reduce inflammation. This can be done without having to latch on to all of the above. While it is admirable to ascribe to sustainable meat/ag, it may not be the most important thing for humans at the current time. We can work to get there, but trying to pile everything on at once can be a bit overwhelming for someone new coming into the fold.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    I started questioning this book after reading sentences describing how incredible, fantastic and unbelievable the information in this book was, and how it would completely change my life. It was really silly, exaggerated sentences that seemed unprofessional and out of place in a book allegedly presenting medical research to the public. I read this in Norwegian, so maybe those sentences sounded OK in English, but they made me wonder about the author, and finally this made me DNF the book. When I g I started questioning this book after reading sentences describing how incredible, fantastic and unbelievable the information in this book was, and how it would completely change my life. It was really silly, exaggerated sentences that seemed unprofessional and out of place in a book allegedly presenting medical research to the public. I read this in Norwegian, so maybe those sentences sounded OK in English, but they made me wonder about the author, and finally this made me DNF the book. When I googled the author, he appeared on lists of alleged "health experts" you should not trust. You can read a critique of him here: https://www.thecut.com/2015/06/proble... I do agree that the microbiome in our gut is very important, and eating less sugar would be good for it. It's also perfectly believable that one organ affects others in our body and that more doctors should study how they interact with each other, rather than becoming experts in just one of them. So there are good information here too. It's just over the top, too much, stretched too far without proper research to back up all the claims of how fantastic Perlmutter's solutions to all your health problems are. Stating that fixing people's gut biome is a miracle cure to alzheimer and diabetes worldwide is a pretty big claim.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    3.5 on this one. I think Dr. Perlmutter's work is important in informing the general public about advances in understanding the human microbiome (gut bacteria), but I think the science is still too early to justify his "magic bullet" analysis. He makes it sound as if this is the cure-all for every type of disease. I find this field of research fascinating and look forward to what comes next. 3.5 on this one. I think Dr. Perlmutter's work is important in informing the general public about advances in understanding the human microbiome (gut bacteria), but I think the science is still too early to justify his "magic bullet" analysis. He makes it sound as if this is the cure-all for every type of disease. I find this field of research fascinating and look forward to what comes next.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Charlene

    Perlmutter has a long history of pushing pseudoscience. He preys on those who lack scientific literacy, all so he can make a buck. There are other books written by credible researchers. Giulia Enders' Gut and the Sonnenburgs' The Good Gut are two good examples of scientifically sound books on gut microbes. Do yourself a favor and don't waste your time and money on snake oil. Perlmutter has a long history of pushing pseudoscience. He preys on those who lack scientific literacy, all so he can make a buck. There are other books written by credible researchers. Giulia Enders' Gut and the Sonnenburgs' The Good Gut are two good examples of scientifically sound books on gut microbes. Do yourself a favor and don't waste your time and money on snake oil.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    This guy likes to think of himself as a pioneer. But mostly he's a quack. He quotes real scholarly research and then wildly extrapolates way beyond the current knowledge and acts like he's totally sure of his understanding. Given all that, it did open up for me a new understanding about the ecosystem in my body of beneficial bacteria. Its amazing. And it did lead me in the direction of finding out about the human biome project, and great writing on the subject by Michael Pollan, who I respect as This guy likes to think of himself as a pioneer. But mostly he's a quack. He quotes real scholarly research and then wildly extrapolates way beyond the current knowledge and acts like he's totally sure of his understanding. Given all that, it did open up for me a new understanding about the ecosystem in my body of beneficial bacteria. Its amazing. And it did lead me in the direction of finding out about the human biome project, and great writing on the subject by Michael Pollan, who I respect as a much more careful and ethical writer. Also got me started on taking probiotics and making kombucha so I have to give the guy a little credit.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Dardarian

    Very valuable information. I knew a lot of it already but wish I could get all my friends who are troubled by chronic medical issues to read it and experiment for themselves.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Weber

    This is a fascinating book about how interconnected our gut and brain are. If you geek out on health sciences, I recommend this one.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bill Pardi

    Excellent. Been following a lot of the science found in this book for several years, and my take from living a lot of it is that a)it really works, and b)the American food supply, dietary recommendations, and obsession with antibiotics is slowly killing us. My one gripe with this book is that his recommended way of changing your eating habits is to buy expensive, often difficult to find ingredients, and make ALL your own food. While that would certainly do it, my reaction when I read the sections Excellent. Been following a lot of the science found in this book for several years, and my take from living a lot of it is that a)it really works, and b)the American food supply, dietary recommendations, and obsession with antibiotics is slowly killing us. My one gripe with this book is that his recommended way of changing your eating habits is to buy expensive, often difficult to find ingredients, and make ALL your own food. While that would certainly do it, my reaction when I read the sections on food and recipes was "but I already have a full time job." Over the past few years and a lot of experimentation I figured out how to take much of what he recommends make it work for me, but for someone just jumping in I wish he provided recommendations that were a lot more practical.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annie Kate

    If you or your loved ones suffer from any autoimmune disease, mental health issue, or degenerative disease--any one of the many health issues that is poorly understood--you will want to consider the concepts in this book. I plan to post a review of this book on my blog late February, 2016.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    This should be mandatory reading for everyone.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jenju

    I solemnly swear to treat my microbiome better from now on, but I am not yet ready to go gluten free.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Written with too much of a self-help/carny huckster vibe. For an excellent book about microbiomes, try Ed Yong's I Contain Multitudes. Written with too much of a self-help/carny huckster vibe. For an excellent book about microbiomes, try Ed Yong's I Contain Multitudes.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jo-Ann Duff (Duffy The Writer)

    There are plenty of 'revolutionary' ideas around food and lifestyle at the moment. Pete Evans, with his controversial Paleo books, and the unfortunate business of blogger Belle Gibson, who lied about having cancer to all her followers and seemed to be beating the disease, simply by switching to a wholefood, healthy lifestyle. You only need to visit a food court in the CBD at lunchtime, or the cafes of Bondi, to see everyone enjoying an overpriced, yet delicious, cold pressed juice. So what are w There are plenty of 'revolutionary' ideas around food and lifestyle at the moment. Pete Evans, with his controversial Paleo books, and the unfortunate business of blogger Belle Gibson, who lied about having cancer to all her followers and seemed to be beating the disease, simply by switching to a wholefood, healthy lifestyle. You only need to visit a food court in the CBD at lunchtime, or the cafes of Bondi, to see everyone enjoying an overpriced, yet delicious, cold pressed juice. So what are we doing wrong, and what should we be doing? According to the author of Brain Maker, Dr David Perlmutter (best selling author of Grain Brain), we can prevent MS, Alzheimers, Depression and Anxiety by not having a c-section and eating a diet full of pre and pro biotics. If, like me, reading that statement throws you in spin and horrifies you, then this book is not going to be for you. His rational is based on many hours of research, hundreds of mice having needless tests (surely you can do diet and food tests on humans without the undue stress placed on a small animal?) and the odd reference to Harvard. There are also lots of anecdotal examples of how Dr Perlmutter had sad, overweight, patients, even one who had MS, come into his office, only to be cured of all ills a few weeks later. He even has videos of successful before and after shots on his website. I could do with losing a couple of pounds, and can feel heavy, sluggish and even a little down on the odd day. Anxiety also grips me on occasion, but I have no major body issues. The food suggestions make sense; Less carbs, more good fats, less processed foods, filtered water and reduce fructose intake, all good stuff right? After reading through this book I have decided I will consciously cut down on the carbs, ramp up the pro-biotics and add some kimchi into my diet. Will I pin any hopes of a radical transformation on it? No. It would be good enough to lose an inch or two and feel a bit lighter. What if my partner had MS? What if my Mother's brain was failing with dementia? Would I cut out all modern treatment to follow the diet? No WAY! But, some will. They may believe the pages of Brain Maker and make the right decision; They may pin everything on the claims and still find heartbreak. This book, if claims are true, will build momentum, wipe out suffering, major diseases and the need for billion dollar pharmaceutical industries (which I do agree, want us to keep popping those pills and buying those scripts). This book raised questions for me about my own diet, and raised more about the state of our health systems, and the power a book can be to peddle any kind of diet. The diet makes sense to me in places, as a healthy way to live, but I do not for one second think that dementia could be avoided completely by following this diet, or a child will get MS because she was born via C-section, took antibiotics and was formula fed. The claims of solving the worlds most debilitating diseases fell flat with me. Take what you need from this book, enjoy the tasty recipes and read with an open mind. Learn all you can from each side of the fence before plunging in and following something which may or may not serve you. 2.5 stars from me (too many mice tests and grand claims of miracles in Dr's offices). #healthyliving#diets#guthealth#brainhealth

  19. 4 out of 5

    John Behle

    There are breakthroughs in this book that work. Doctor Perlmutter continually stresses the microbiome-brain connection, but adds that every cell in our bodies is connected to every other one. The SAD-Standard American Diet-is causal in inflammation that leads to our modern, now so common, diseases of excess: diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity and now, Alzheimer's. These are the equal to any medieval plague. Our culture, our society, our prosperity, have force fed us (willingly) with so much ju There are breakthroughs in this book that work. Doctor Perlmutter continually stresses the microbiome-brain connection, but adds that every cell in our bodies is connected to every other one. The SAD-Standard American Diet-is causal in inflammation that leads to our modern, now so common, diseases of excess: diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity and now, Alzheimer's. These are the equal to any medieval plague. Our culture, our society, our prosperity, have force fed us (willingly) with so much junk energy. Our bodies, our brains do not know how to handle, how to process, this onslaught of sugar led power. What happens is massive bulging, short circuiting, gummed up brain synapses and early death. Our bloodstreams have become sugary sweet pipelines that can cause blindness and loss of limbs. This book has led me to make immediate changes in my nutrition. Be on the lookout for hidden sugars, trans fats, gluten. Switch to fermented foods like yogurts, Kefir. I am much more wary of what I consume now and already see and feel the difference.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I've read a few books by this author and I always sigh because his books sound like one long infomercial for his website. So I was pleased that little pitfall was avoided with this one. What I liked the most about this one was all of the research. It was impressive. The author came in well-armed to make his message solid. He was passionate about gut health and it felt a little urgent as he rolled from one point to the next. So 4 stars. I've read a few books by this author and I always sigh because his books sound like one long infomercial for his website. So I was pleased that little pitfall was avoided with this one. What I liked the most about this one was all of the research. It was impressive. The author came in well-armed to make his message solid. He was passionate about gut health and it felt a little urgent as he rolled from one point to the next. So 4 stars.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Young

    Great ad for probiotics. Overall informative about gastro-intestinal health and the link to the rest of your body's function. The book is dishonest in how it attempts to claim possible solutions for other conditions outside of its realm, as opposed to acknowledging that people with other conditions also have medical problems which can be alleviated with these possible solutions. The lack of talk about possible drawbacks to these procedures also makes the book less credible from a scientific pers Great ad for probiotics. Overall informative about gastro-intestinal health and the link to the rest of your body's function. The book is dishonest in how it attempts to claim possible solutions for other conditions outside of its realm, as opposed to acknowledging that people with other conditions also have medical problems which can be alleviated with these possible solutions. The lack of talk about possible drawbacks to these procedures also makes the book less credible from a scientific perspective. The other food suggestions seem credible, though a lot of it builds off of the earlier book Grain Brain. That said, I did go and buy a ton of probiotic yogurt after reading this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Important information here about cultivating and nurturing a healthy and vibrant microbiome in your intestines. Great for newcomers to mindful health and eating. The last third of the book does gets a little preachy / infomercially, but there is solid research in the rest of the book. Eat a variety of fermented foods and make healthy choices with your food. Chill out on sugar, and gluten. There, you have it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Gut to Brain connection. Sally Fallon said it first!!!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Weiyi

    They should really start to make statistics and research methods a part of the medical board exam so that we don't see more books like this hitting the shelf. They should really start to make statistics and research methods a part of the medical board exam so that we don't see more books like this hitting the shelf.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kassandra

    You know, Dr. Perlmutter, if you structured your book correctly, you wouldn't have to spend the first quarter of it telling us, "I'll explain this later, but for now just trust me." This guy takes a bunch of promising preliminary research into the importance of gut bacteria and then extrapolates it so that a bad gut microbiome is the cause for every disease. As an excellent example, he argues that cesarean section birth is a cause for autism because children born by c-section are more likely to ge You know, Dr. Perlmutter, if you structured your book correctly, you wouldn't have to spend the first quarter of it telling us, "I'll explain this later, but for now just trust me." This guy takes a bunch of promising preliminary research into the importance of gut bacteria and then extrapolates it so that a bad gut microbiome is the cause for every disease. As an excellent example, he argues that cesarean section birth is a cause for autism because children born by c-section are more likely to get autism, which to him means that not going through the bacteria in the vagina on the way into the world is a leading cause of autism. Too bad a study came out 3-4 months after this book showing that it isn't a causation--the two are related but likely have a shared trigger rather than one being the cause of the other. Though I guess "Your gut bacteria is basically your entire emotional, physical and mental health" is a lot more interesting of an argument than "preliminary studies show a greater correlation between gut bacteria and emotional, physical and mental health than previously believed." So people with disease x have elevated levels of bacteria y in their gut. Doesn't mean the bacteria caused the disease. I also take huge issue with the study mentioned in the beginning of the book that compares levels of dementia between European and African groups. Besides the fact that he called the Europeans "western" there (which, barf, Europe is north of Africa, but he didn't make up that convention), he went on to extrapolate that the "unhygienic" Africans have less dementia than the "hygienic" Europeans for the sole reason that they have different gut bacteria. What about age? What about other factors? What part of Africa?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Misha

    It's been a while since I've written a review, but I found this one worthy of the time to take to write one. I'm back on my food kick at the moment, so this book came at a perfect time. David Perlmutter, the author, is a neurologist who discusses in detail the connection between our gut microbes, our brain and really the rest of the body. Our gut is basically a 'second brain', having major impact on what signals are sent to our brain. Our gut is also our defense and when weak, can be penetrated It's been a while since I've written a review, but I found this one worthy of the time to take to write one. I'm back on my food kick at the moment, so this book came at a perfect time. David Perlmutter, the author, is a neurologist who discusses in detail the connection between our gut microbes, our brain and really the rest of the body. Our gut is basically a 'second brain', having major impact on what signals are sent to our brain. Our gut is also our defense and when weak, can be penetrated to release toxins and harmful substances to the rest of our body. Before two years ago, you would have had me interested in this theory and maybe practice some of the helpful suggestions he mentions. After having a horrible virus that took several years away from a good quality of life, I have totally become a hippie when it concerns food. There is nothing worse than being in pain and having it constant at that. Going from a normal, energetic and pain-free life to one with daily pain, you will do or try anything to alleviate or eliminate that suffering. Food has greatly helped me in that healing process. I do absolutely believe I first got sick because of an unbalanced microbe biome. I wholeheartedly believe it. I think this book is a must read for everyone, especially if they haven't heard the correlation between health and your digestion/bacteria. I listened to the book and found it most likely easier to listen than actually reading it. I could zone out at times if it seemed repetitively and not miss much. :) I am once again recommitting to eating healthy and hopefully preventing further issues!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris Jennings

    Everyone seems to be talking about gut bacteria and probiotics these days. But this book takes the conversation a step further and goes so much deeper. Who knew that the brain was so closely tied to the stomach? Feeling butterflies in your stomach when your brain is nervous? It all makes sense now. At times this book is depressing because a lot of our gut bacteria is setup before we're able to do anything about it (natural birth? breastfed as a child? lots of antibiotics as a baby?). But where t Everyone seems to be talking about gut bacteria and probiotics these days. But this book takes the conversation a step further and goes so much deeper. Who knew that the brain was so closely tied to the stomach? Feeling butterflies in your stomach when your brain is nervous? It all makes sense now. At times this book is depressing because a lot of our gut bacteria is setup before we're able to do anything about it (natural birth? breastfed as a child? lots of antibiotics as a baby?). But where the book really shines is in the paractical advice on how to improve your gut. There are easy recipes and tips that are better than typical diet plans. You should certainly go into the book with a healthy dose of skepticism (Perlmutter says probiotics will cure everything from autism to obesity and pretty much every other ailment ever) but you'll definitely walk away with lots of practical knowledge.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ginger Bensman

    I'm fascinated by the ecology of the body and our interdependence with microbes (called the microbiome - "that vast population of organisms that live in your body and outnumber your cells ten to one"). Last year I read I Contain Multitudes by Ed Yong (a book with a more scientific message that whetted my interest and has me reading widely on the topic). Brain Maker has a tighter focus - the latest developments and promising research about microbiome's interactions with the central nervous system I'm fascinated by the ecology of the body and our interdependence with microbes (called the microbiome - "that vast population of organisms that live in your body and outnumber your cells ten to one"). Last year I read I Contain Multitudes by Ed Yong (a book with a more scientific message that whetted my interest and has me reading widely on the topic). Brain Maker has a tighter focus - the latest developments and promising research about microbiome's interactions with the central nervous system and the brain, with some practical advice on ways to tailor and support your own microbiome, and possibly enhance your own health.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kinsey

    This book explains the benefits of understanding gut health and the affect this has on various aspects of our life. Biggest takeaways: 1) gut health is a second brain 2) inflammation (mainly from sugar and gluten) causes various health problems 3) many modern-day medicines only treat symptoms without getting to the root This was an informative and thorough read. This is a great starting point that I'd recommend to anyone hoping to better understand holistic health. This book explains the benefits of understanding gut health and the affect this has on various aspects of our life. Biggest takeaways: 1) gut health is a second brain 2) inflammation (mainly from sugar and gluten) causes various health problems 3) many modern-day medicines only treat symptoms without getting to the root This was an informative and thorough read. This is a great starting point that I'd recommend to anyone hoping to better understand holistic health.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jaehyun Yeom

    Fantastic! The book fixed my everlasting depression for a long time. I liked that it also provided some recipes. I didn't fully follow what he suggested but combined with some other practices following my gut feeling. Fantastic! The book fixed my everlasting depression for a long time. I liked that it also provided some recipes. I didn't fully follow what he suggested but combined with some other practices following my gut feeling.

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