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The Columbus Code

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In 1492 Christopher Columbus bore a secret agenda as he set out with his tiny fleet to discover a New World. The startling truth? Columbus himself was a Jew! And he sought a new home for his persecuted Jewish kin to escape King Ferdinand’s and Queen Isabella’s newly wrought Spanish Inquisition.


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In 1492 Christopher Columbus bore a secret agenda as he set out with his tiny fleet to discover a New World. The startling truth? Columbus himself was a Jew! And he sought a new home for his persecuted Jewish kin to escape King Ferdinand’s and Queen Isabella’s newly wrought Spanish Inquisition.

30 review for The Columbus Code

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    enjoyed this action thriller based around the brotherhood and a man searching for his proof he is a descendant of christopher columbus which he takes on after his mother's death but he is not just a normal guy as secret service agent winters and gets caught in the action as it takes us across spain. however the ending felt like a sequel is on its way though. enjoyed this action thriller based around the brotherhood and a man searching for his proof he is a descendant of christopher columbus which he takes on after his mother's death but he is not just a normal guy as secret service agent winters and gets caught in the action as it takes us across spain. however the ending felt like a sequel is on its way though.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    Secret Service Agent John Winters is on leave from his job. He was on a raid that went bad and he's suffering from a form of PTSD. When his mother dies, she asks him to promise to follow through on her research. He thinks it's crazy, after all how could his family be a direct descendant from Christopher Columbus. But he's got nothing better to do. To complicate matters, John's daughter Maria is in Spain working as part of a team of lawyers overseeing a merger. John's research leads him to Spain. Secret Service Agent John Winters is on leave from his job. He was on a raid that went bad and he's suffering from a form of PTSD. When his mother dies, she asks him to promise to follow through on her research. He thinks it's crazy, after all how could his family be a direct descendant from Christopher Columbus. But he's got nothing better to do. To complicate matters, John's daughter Maria is in Spain working as part of a team of lawyers overseeing a merger. John's research leads him to Spain. Maria discovers that there is more going on with the merger than it appears. Soon both of them are running for their lives. Can they figure out how the puzzle connects before it costs them their lives? I wasn't sure what to expect when I requested this one. I discovered a book that led me on a tale of intrigue, adventure, and suspense that I literally could not put down. This isn't my normal style to read, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. The clues to the puzzle were captivating. I wanted to know how the various storylines would merge together. This book reminded me a lot of the Davinci Code. At least with the thrill of the chase. I recommend it to fans of thrillers and adventure. I received a pdf version of this book for free from the publisher for the purpose of reviewing. My thoughts and opinions are my own. Recommended to fans of Dan Brown, thrillers, action novels. Rating - 4 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    This was an okay book. It starts off slow; incredibly slow. I do not know that it really ever "picks up the pace" until the last couple of chapters. It is an historical novel involving 'recent' discoveries (or theories) that Christopher Columbus was a Jew and the perilous journey of discovery undertaken by a family trying to honor a deathbed promise (of sorts) as this family discovers its roots. The character development is good; the author takes plenty of time to develop the three-to-four main This was an okay book. It starts off slow; incredibly slow. I do not know that it really ever "picks up the pace" until the last couple of chapters. It is an historical novel involving 'recent' discoveries (or theories) that Christopher Columbus was a Jew and the perilous journey of discovery undertaken by a family trying to honor a deathbed promise (of sorts) as this family discovers its roots. The character development is good; the author takes plenty of time to develop the three-to-four main characters in the novel. The development of some of the supporting cast is equally well-done. There were a couple of shocks for me that I honestly did not see coming (but probably should have), so that was a pleasant surprise. As slow as it was, I did find myself enjoying it far more than I thought I was going to (as I had started flipping to the back to see how many pages I had left to read). It is not a nail-biter, by any means. The 'baddies' of the piece are a bit much, at times, and I was surprised to learn it was almost an "End-times" novel (view spoiler)[as it involves the Antichrist, or a version of the Antichrist, and a one-world government trying to be put into place, but this government will be governed by a corporation ruled by an ancient brotherhood of sorts (hide spoiler)] . (view spoiler)[It has "all-powerful villains" who can access information and discover not only unknown identities but also find 'safe houses' and 'final destinations' of their target(s) faster than any government or top-secret spy agency. I mean, seriously! The villains in this novel are able to find out information SO MUCH FASTER than any law enforcement agency or information gathering agency, it almost makes you think that maybe the villains should be put in charge, they are so much more efficient at gathering information, and most of their subordinates, employees, and dependents do not suffer under their rule (unless, of course, they cross the bosses a time or two too many). It was ridiculous at how fast Tejada's minions were able to find Winters and Sophia, regardless of the actions taken to prevent their being followed or discovered! These 'bad guys' were practically all-knowing, all-powerful, and present practically everywhere!! I find myself really resenting novels that have villains like this in them; it seems impossible for the hero to survive, and when the villains start making stupid mistakes when they have never made one yet, it gets equally annoying. I am sure some might say that I am "ignoring God's providence" or some such statement, and I am not saying it cannot happen "in real life" where the foes of God's anointed are confounded, but it just gets 'over-the-top' in these books, sometimes. And not just in "Christian fiction," either.(view spoiler)[ Anymore, it seems there has to be a 'broken hero trying to find his way" or "discover a new path" in fiction today. I am not sure why that is. Perhaps to make the hero 'more relatable' to the reading audience? It sort-of works, in this story (except I felt like the hero had forgotten too much of his training over the years, considering some of the 'mistakes' he makes throughout the book). In any case, as I said earlier, I did think the author did a nice job with developing his main characters and some of the side-characters and peripheral characters. I liked the relationship that developed between John Winters and Sophia Conte; I could see it progressing further, if this book turns into a series and she stays in it. (view spoiler)[I also thought it interesting that the author had a relationship start to develop between Maria and Tejada like he did; I did not see that coming. Well, it was more of a hint of a possible relationship between the two of them. It would be interesting to discover if she is able to "save" him from fully becoming the "Antichrist" now that Abaddon is apparently dead by suicide (drug overdose) (Abaddon being the former superior of Tejada) and Tejada has taken over as the 'head' of this nefarious brotherhood. I am not sure how long grief is supposed to last, but the author has John "still" trying to process his wife's death during the 9-11 attacks as well as PTSD from a raid gone bad. He claims he is trying to process things, but it is implied he is actually trying to avoid dealing with what happened to him and how it affected him in either case. You have the annoying psychiatrist who claims she is only trying to help him deal with his trauma so he can get back to work whereas John is actively resisting her efforts to help him as he does not believe she is helping him at all. These kinds of inclusions to stories always seem forced to me; unconvincing. Granted, I am sure it is a tough thing to write in a convincing fashion or manner - how a person deals (or doesn't deal) with trauma and the consequences of the aftermath. It was just amusing, in some respects, how Sophia was able to help John far more than his psychiatrist did, in the long run. I guess all it takes is the love of (another) good woman. (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[The story definitely took a turn I did not expect it to take. Granted, I was shocked by some of the deaths that did occur in the novel - I do not know why, but I honestly did not expect them to happen (which, in retrospect, seems silly, but, in one case, the author did a great job building up hope for this character before dashing that hope on the rocks of despair). I was shocked that the death of this one character, that it occurred! I could not believe it - hahahah! It was AWESOME! One of the more powerfully impacting moments, emotionally, in the book for me. Not that I wanted this particular character to die, in the least but, but the author did a great job building up positive emotions for that person before . . . duh, duh duuuuuuh! Anyway. The 'bigger turn' I did not expect it to take was the plan to not only set off a nuke right outside Wall Street, but for the villains to use Ben Winters, John's little brother, to set the bomb off himself. I knew it had to do with somehow bringing down the United States as a 'world power' and 'world leader' in the global economy; that much was pretty obvious after the villains began discussing changing the economic standard from the U.S. dollar to another form of currency (the euro as opposed to the yen or ruble or whatever currency China is using). The villains are thinking in terms of creating economic instabilities in the world markets before having specific world powers dump their American dollars and switching over to the Euro. Yeah, I have seen that before in other novels, too. But THEN the author has the heroes discover that an old "suitcase nuke" captured in transit from Russia to Iran is going to be used to destroy a seven-block radius around Wall Street. THAT was when it got 'interesting' for me, even though I suspected the heroes were going to 'save the day' and 'survive' to fight again (or, to run some more, depending on how the author goes with a second book if he continues this series). (hide spoiler)] I did enjoy the 'journey of historical discovery' as John bonds with Sophia while discovering his historical past. He is on a suspended leave-of-absence, anyway, so he uses the time to honor the dying wish of his mother to further research his family's genealogy to discover if he is a direct descendant of Christopher Columbus. It was fun to read about their discoveries while "watching" their relationship develop over the course of the novel. I did think the author did a nice job with how their relationship went from professional to platonic to close (intimate; emotionally intimate, anyway). I liked how things developed between the two of them and that Sophia was a formidable, remarkable woman in her own right (view spoiler)[although the number of connections she had, world-wide, made me think there was more to her than she initially revealed to John. I could see this being the case, as at one point she did imply that there was more to her story, to her background, than even John realized and that she would reveal it to him, one day, depending on how things progressed between them). It would be amusing to learn that she was also some kind of former government agent who had to retire or who chose to retire after a painful death of somebody close, like a husband or close partner or something like that) (hide spoiler)] . I think the novel's most glaring weakness is how slow it is; it starts off slow and it feels ponderous, at times, as the author is laying things out and clearly preparing 'groundwork' for future novels in a series. Plus, this novel is left so open-ended that it seems clear it was written to have at least one sequel in mind, if not more future stories. I do hope the author does write some more stories after this; at least one more, to 'wrap things up' and bring some kind of . . . 'finality' to the story instead of leaving it hanging like he did. When I reached the last two pages, I was, "that's IT?!??!? I waded through nearly four hundred pages for THAT!!!?!??!?" I was very disappointed with the ending. For being a "Christian novel," the Christianity in it is not 'in your face;' it is more in the background, as various characters in the book have some sort of religious beliefs or upbringing. Two of the main characters are NOT Christians, although the groundwork seems to have been laid for them to become believers in subsequent stories. Overall, I am glad I did take a chance and read it. I was going to give it two stars, but decided to give it three (say, 2.7 rounded up), as it did hold my interest enough for me to finish it after the first few chapters. (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    In 1492 Christopher Columbus bore a secret agenda as he set out with his tiny fleet to discover a New World. The startling truth? Columbus himself was a Jew! And he sought a new home for his persecuted Jewish kin to escape King Ferdinand’s and Queen Isabella’s newly wrought Spanish Inquisition. The Columbus Code is just that – the true, historical puzzle few could comprehend until today. Consistent with great historical fiction of our time, New York Times best-selling author Mike Evans pens a sto In 1492 Christopher Columbus bore a secret agenda as he set out with his tiny fleet to discover a New World. The startling truth? Columbus himself was a Jew! And he sought a new home for his persecuted Jewish kin to escape King Ferdinand’s and Queen Isabella’s newly wrought Spanish Inquisition. The Columbus Code is just that – the true, historical puzzle few could comprehend until today. Consistent with great historical fiction of our time, New York Times best-selling author Mike Evans pens a story replete with intrigue, adventure, and brutal persecution. The story begins with John Winters, an American Secret Service agent, who unravels centuries old truths about Christopher Columbus and the real drama that lay behind those famous voyages to the Americas. This is not my usual reading genre but I thought it was well written and I enjoyed it. Secret Service Agent John Winters is on medical leave from his job after a raid that went bad and he's suffering from a form of PTSD. After his mother dies, he finds a request from her to continue her research on their family being direct descendants of Christopher Columbus. With nothing better to do he starts on a quest that leads him to Barcelona and a search for Christopher Columbus' secret journal. Meanwhile, his estranged daughter Maria, a corporate attorney, is also in Barcelona overseeing a merger. However there's more to this very large and powerful company than she knows. Behind the scenes is a secret society that is putting in place a plan to financially rule the world and possibly bring about the anti-christ. John and Maria's worlds collide when the search for Columbus' journal gains the attention of the secret society and they end up joining forces and on the run while trying to figure out how it all connects before it costs them their lives. *Thanks to First Look and Worthy Publishers for the complimentary copy of this book for review purposes. All opinions stated are my own.* ABOUT THE AUTHOR MIKE EVANS is a #1 New York Times best-selling author with more than 25 million copies in print, including Christopher Columbus: Secret Jew. He lives in Fort Worth, Texas. He is the Chairman of the Board of the Ten Boom Museum in Holland (tenboom.org) and also of the Friends of Zion Museum in Jerusalem (FOZHC.org). Evans is founder of the Jerusalem Prayer Team (jpteam.org) and has sixty published books. To contact Dr. Evans for interviews or speaking engagements, send correspondence to: P. O. Box 30000, Phoenix, AZ 85046; e-mail [email protected]; or telephone 817-268-1228.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    I must confess: I feel bad for these 3 stars. I wish I could give it a higher rating but unfortunately I can't. Here's why: The synopsis promised an action packed story full of suspense and mystery. Instead, I got a very very slow pace. Nothing really interesting happens and it only gets better in the last fifty pages. Now about the characters. They were funny and broken at the same time, with a pleasant dynamic. I absolutely loved the crafted way they were written and you really could feel empath I must confess: I feel bad for these 3 stars. I wish I could give it a higher rating but unfortunately I can't. Here's why: The synopsis promised an action packed story full of suspense and mystery. Instead, I got a very very slow pace. Nothing really interesting happens and it only gets better in the last fifty pages. Now about the characters. They were funny and broken at the same time, with a pleasant dynamic. I absolutely loved the crafted way they were written and you really could feel empathy for them. However, the weird part was the romance. I mean, it was kind of obvious but I still couldn't process it. Something I do applaud is the deep investigation about Columbus. I learnt a lot about some historical facts, so it was like reading a history textbook but more entertaining. I'm wondering about the ending because I feel like this is going to be a series. If it's so, I'm curious to see the development in the next book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David Pyle

    A riveting, immensely enjoyable tale, with a subtle Christian world-view. No over-the-zooplankton evangelistic message but a clear introspection which includes the work of spiritual forces, divine and demonic. I recommend it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    Who was Christopher Columbus? He’s widely perceived to be a Genoese adventurer who persuaded the Spanish queen to finance his expeditions. He hoped to discover a new route to the East Indies. Instead, he came across a series of islands in the area we now know as the Americas. But what if there was more to the story? The Columbus Code isn’t the first time I’ve heard the theory that Columbus was Jewish but, if this novel isn’t the start of a series, it fails to make a convincing argument for that Who was Christopher Columbus? He’s widely perceived to be a Genoese adventurer who persuaded the Spanish queen to finance his expeditions. He hoped to discover a new route to the East Indies. Instead, he came across a series of islands in the area we now know as the Americas. But what if there was more to the story? The Columbus Code isn’t the first time I’ve heard the theory that Columbus was Jewish but, if this novel isn’t the start of a series, it fails to make a convincing argument for that supposition. There are two story lines in The Columbus Code. In the first, Agent Mike Winters, recovering after a mission gone wrong, decides to research his deceased mother’s claim that the family is descended from Christopher Columbus. He makes contact with a Spanish genealogist who suggests that he visit her country to learn more about his roots. At the same time, his daughter is in Barcelona on business and discovering that perhaps not everything in a particular business deal is above board. Eventually, the historical mystery and financial thriller combine as father and daughter find themselves on the run and in a race against time. The novel contains various topical elements. There is discussion about blood moons, the possibility of a global currency, Russian credit card scams, and the rise of the anti-Christ out of Europe. What there isn’t, is a satisfying link between Columbus and a mysterious cabal led by a being called Abaddon. Yes, the name is definitely an in your face reference to destruction but the character reminded me more of the Emperor from the Star Wars movies than anything demonic. While Winter and his daughter ultimately save the day in The Columbus Code it is evident there is still work to do. There is still a code to crack and many questions to be answered. That’s why I hope there is at least another book to come, because otherwise we’re left with a very unsatisfying ending. If this is the start of a series, however, then it’s an intriguing beginning. Thank you to Worthy Publishing for my complimentary Advance Reader’s Copy of The Columbus Code, which I received in exchange for my honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Victor Gentile

    Mike Evans in his new book, “The Columbus Code” published by Worthy Publishing introduces us to John Winters, descendant of Christopher Columbus. From the back cover: In 1492 Christopher Columbus bore a secret agenda as he set out with his tiny fleet to discover a New World. What was that startling truth? The Columbus Code is just that the true, historical puzzle few could comprehend until today. Consistent with great historical fiction of our time, New York Times best-sell author Mike Evans pens Mike Evans in his new book, “The Columbus Code” published by Worthy Publishing introduces us to John Winters, descendant of Christopher Columbus. From the back cover: In 1492 Christopher Columbus bore a secret agenda as he set out with his tiny fleet to discover a New World. What was that startling truth? The Columbus Code is just that the true, historical puzzle few could comprehend until today. Consistent with great historical fiction of our time, New York Times best-sell author Mike Evans pens a story replete with intrigue, adventure, and brutal persecution. The story begins with John Winters, an American Secret Service agent, who unravels centuries old truths about Christopher Columbus and the real drama that lay behind those famous voyages to the Americas. There is a secret society that is putting in place a plan to destroy the American dollar and financially rule the world. John Winters went to Barcelona to continue the genealogical research his mother had begun before she died that they are direct descendants of Christopher Columbus. He teams up with his estranged lawyer daughter and, together, they are on the run. Their quest to stop the Society before they get killed will take them from Spain to Israel and back to the U.S. Mr. Evans has loaded his book with political intrigue, suspense and a very clever puzzle. John Winters and his daughter, Maria, are very complex characters that we come to care deeply about and want them to succeed. Plus their lives are in very great danger as this is a page-turning thriller. This book will keep you reading as fast as you can to find out what will happen next. You won’t be disappointed I assure you. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Worthy Publishing for this review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  9. 5 out of 5

    Beckie Burnham

    The Columbus Code is an international suspense novel reminiscent of The DaVinci Code. Filled with ancient documents, terrorist threats and a secret society determined to establish a one-world government, Mike Evans’ novel is perfect for those who like conspiracy theories and last days narratives. I found this book unputdownable! John Winters is a Secret Service agent on administrative leave due to an operation that went south. His past and present have collided to keep him off-duty until he opens The Columbus Code is an international suspense novel reminiscent of The DaVinci Code. Filled with ancient documents, terrorist threats and a secret society determined to establish a one-world government, Mike Evans’ novel is perfect for those who like conspiracy theories and last days narratives. I found this book unputdownable! John Winters is a Secret Service agent on administrative leave due to an operation that went south. His past and present have collided to keep him off-duty until he opens up to his government psychiatrist. His strained relationships with his only daughter and much younger brother and recent death of his mother keep Winters isolated and paralyzed by fear and doubts. A simple request to continue his mother’s genealogical search turns deadly and threatens not only his family members but his country. The Columbus Code is definitely plot-driven. Fast-paced and adrenaline-laced, it kept this reader turning the pages. I finished it in record time! The elements of secrets shrouded in history and mystery, a shadowy Brotherhood with evil intentions, and a conspiracy among nations to upset the US economy were interesting and seemed a bit too real. ;) Although the emphasis was on plot, not character, I still connected with John, his daughter Maria and Sophie, an academic and love interest for John, and worried for their safety. Did I say the book seemed very real?! The author also includes hints of the End Times with references to the antichrist and blood moons. Some of the bad guys get away and some of the good guys are missing at the end, so I think there will probably be a sequel to come. I hope so, because The Columbus Code left me wanting more. Recommended. Audience: adults. (Thanks to Worthy Publishers for a review copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Hedden

    Mix a little new testament prophecy, some Jewish Kabbalah,a few little known facts and some speculation about Christopher Columbus and what do you get? A very well written and intriguing story by Mike Evans called The Columbus Code. The main characters in this book are Winters, a Secret Service agent currently on a medical leave and his daughter Maria Winters, a corporate attorney. They are by no means close, but they are not hateful toward each other either but they have several issues to work Mix a little new testament prophecy, some Jewish Kabbalah,a few little known facts and some speculation about Christopher Columbus and what do you get? A very well written and intriguing story by Mike Evans called The Columbus Code. The main characters in this book are Winters, a Secret Service agent currently on a medical leave and his daughter Maria Winters, a corporate attorney. They are by no means close, but they are not hateful toward each other either but they have several issues to work through and you see that happen during the story. The story really gets started after the funeral of Winter's mother when he finds a request from her to further the genealogy of their family, as she believes that they are direct descendants of Christopher Columbus. This leads him on a quest half way around the world where he finds himself in the middle of ancient prophecies that expose him and his daughter to real danger and true evil. I enjoyed how Mike was able to develop this story in modern times, using today's issues and make it plausible. I realized about three-quarters of the way through that this was going to be the first book in a series. I am really glad because he developed the characters and the story line so well I would have hated to see it rushed to a conclusion. I am very interested to see how he moves forward with a few of the characters like Sophia, she seems a bit too well connected to be only a genealogist and then there is Tejada is he the anti-christ and maybe looking for a way out? I was given this book in EBook format for my honest opinion by the publisher Worthy Publishing.Read all of my reviews at Blessings N Bloggings

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Evans has created a novel in the style of Dan Brown, with secret societies, secret prophecies, and a plan to financially rule the world. A Secret Service Agent finds out upon his mother's death that she thought they were descendants of Christopher Columbus. She had left him her research and asked him to continue. On leave because of an operation gone bad, he goes to Barcelona. With the help of a beautiful academic specialist on Columbus, they look for his secret journal. The nefarious brotherhoo Evans has created a novel in the style of Dan Brown, with secret societies, secret prophecies, and a plan to financially rule the world. A Secret Service Agent finds out upon his mother's death that she thought they were descendants of Christopher Columbus. She had left him her research and asked him to continue. On leave because of an operation gone bad, he goes to Barcelona. With the help of a beautiful academic specialist on Columbus, they look for his secret journal. The nefarious brotherhood, planning the rise of the Antichrist, wants the journal at all cost. There is a great deal of adventure, intrigue and action in the book. The characters are well drawn and realistic. Evans does bring in the current "blood moon" idea as being part of the Columbus prophecies. He has a secondary character say there had been no tetrads since the destruction of the Temple until the one Columbus would have experienced in 1493-1494. Research, however, seems to show there were four tetrads between 70 AD and 1492 AD. I don't like it when an author has a character make that kind of statement, unsubstantiated. Evans also makes Columbus a Jew, or at least half Jew, a concept some believe. I almost feel Evans wrote this book to make a point about Jews, the Antichrist, and the end days. To me, fiction is just not the place to do that kind of thing. You can read my complete review at http://bit.ly/1LwXgid. I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of an independent and honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    After the death of his wife several years earlier, John Winter's relationship with his daughter Maria became almost non existent. His job as a Secret Service Agent was all he had and now that he is on paid leave after a botched raid he is sort of at loose ends. When his mother dies unexpectedly, she leaves him a note explaining that she has been doing geological research into the family history and believes that they are direct descendants of Christopher Columbus and asks that John continue her After the death of his wife several years earlier, John Winter's relationship with his daughter Maria became almost non existent. His job as a Secret Service Agent was all he had and now that he is on paid leave after a botched raid he is sort of at loose ends. When his mother dies unexpectedly, she leaves him a note explaining that she has been doing geological research into the family history and believes that they are direct descendants of Christopher Columbus and asks that John continue her research where she left off. His research will have him traveling to Spain searching for hidden truths, and what he finds just might cost him his life! The Columbus Code is a page turning read that really left me wanting more! I found myself drawn in by the character of John Winter. I could understand the issues that he was grappling with, and the relationship that he shared with his daughter Maria was also understandable. The plot moves along at a fast pace and it was interesting to see how the different story lines came together. I must admit I was most fascinated with the secret society and their plans for taking over world finances, something that seems very timely for today. The author also touches on end time prophecy including the blood moons, which added another intriguing element for me. Fans of fast paced, suspense filled reads that deal with end time prophecy will certainly find this story worth reading. A complimentary copy of this book was provided for review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Yonasan Aryeh

    In this book, Evans challenges readers with a startling truth of Columbus being a Messianic Jew. This isn't news, and it's not altogether unexpected. What is unexpected, however, is the twists that Evans places in the life of Columbus and its far-reaching impacts to modern and apocalyptic times. The book ends suddenly, much of the action occurring in the last ten percent of the book, leaving the reader building with anticipation that is either barely containable or enough to quit the read (the j In this book, Evans challenges readers with a startling truth of Columbus being a Messianic Jew. This isn't news, and it's not altogether unexpected. What is unexpected, however, is the twists that Evans places in the life of Columbus and its far-reaching impacts to modern and apocalyptic times. The book ends suddenly, much of the action occurring in the last ten percent of the book, leaving the reader building with anticipation that is either barely containable or enough to quit the read (the jury is still out on this one). Within those final pages, the characters come to the full realization of the impact of what the author foreshadowed and gently hinted at through the text, and the reader comes to the realization that this book is not a silo project, but rather simply a prelude to a larger story. Left with an anti-climatic rush and transition to a pause, reminiscent of the Lord of the Rings cinematic works, readers will be both satisfied simultaneously frustrated with the conclusion. Without a doubt, this book is a fun read that engages the audience and only begs to be a completed story. With adventures that travel the world, include government conspiracies and corporate secrets, and end with a bang, the book is enjoyable, yet leaving the feeling of needing more, much like a fancy dinner with the portion a little small... Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.

  14. 4 out of 5

    K. P.

    The Columbus Code is the latest novel by Mike Evans. On the opening pages, you are introduced to John Winters. John is a Secret Service agent, who following a raid that has left him unable to recall all the details that occurred, is currently on administrative leave. Since this operation, John is often awakening from sleep with a racing heart and in a sense of panic! When John's mother suddenly dies, he finds himself back in his hometown. While he is spending some time taking care of his mother's The Columbus Code is the latest novel by Mike Evans. On the opening pages, you are introduced to John Winters. John is a Secret Service agent, who following a raid that has left him unable to recall all the details that occurred, is currently on administrative leave. Since this operation, John is often awakening from sleep with a racing heart and in a sense of panic! When John's mother suddenly dies, he finds himself back in his hometown. While he is spending some time taking care of his mother's estate, he runs across a letter she left for him. His mother had been researching their family's genealogy. She believed that one of their ancestors was Christopher Columbus! She wants John to continue this search. You will not believe what John finds and where he ends up as he journeys first to Barcelona, Spain and then to Jerusalem, before he finally ends up back in the United States at the New York Stock Exchange! You will meet Maria Winters, his estranged daughter, when her business trip overseas becomes intertwined with the details and the characters of John's search! Hang on to see if John and Maria's relationship will be restored!!! At the end of this fast moving tale, you get a strong sense that a sequel will soon be following! I received this book from Worthy Publishing in exchange for my unbiased review. http://penlessreview.blogspot.com/

  15. 4 out of 5

    K P

    The Columbus Code is the latest novel by Mike Evans. On the opening pages, you are introduced to John Winters. John is a Secret Service agent, who following a raid that has left him unable to recall all the details that occurred, is currently on administrative leave. Since this operation, John is often awakening from sleep with a racing heart and in a sense of panic! When John's mother suddenly dies, he finds himself back in his hometown. While he is spending some time taking care of his mother's The Columbus Code is the latest novel by Mike Evans. On the opening pages, you are introduced to John Winters. John is a Secret Service agent, who following a raid that has left him unable to recall all the details that occurred, is currently on administrative leave. Since this operation, John is often awakening from sleep with a racing heart and in a sense of panic! When John's mother suddenly dies, he finds himself back in his hometown. While he is spending some time taking care of his mother's estate, he runs across a letter she left for him. His mother had been researching their family's genealogy. She believed that one of their ancestors was Christopher Columbus! She wants John to continue this search. You will not believe what John finds and where he ends up as he journeys first to Barcelona, Spain and then to Jerusalem, before he finally ends up back in the United States at the New York Stock Exchange! You will meet Maria Winters, his estranged daughter, when her business trip overseas becomes intertwined with the details and the characters of John's search! Hang on to see if John and Maria's relationship will be restored!!! At the end of this fast moving tale, you get a strong sense that a sequel will soon be following! I received this book from Worthy Publishing in exchange for my unbiased review. http://penlessreview.blogspot.com/

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    I didn't have a lot of time to read and review this book, having just received it on Friday and having a review date of Monday - today, but it was a book that was hard to put down, so I had no problem getting it read over the week-end. The book is a great mix of historical events and puzzle and modern day suspense and political intrigue with a shadowy group trying to destroy the American dollar and economy. I thought the book was well written, and though most of the main characters didn't seem I didn't have a lot of time to read and review this book, having just received it on Friday and having a review date of Monday - today, but it was a book that was hard to put down, so I had no problem getting it read over the week-end. The book is a great mix of historical events and puzzle and modern day suspense and political intrigue with a shadowy group trying to destroy the American dollar and economy. I thought the book was well written, and though most of the main characters didn't seem to have a relationship with God, it had a Christian world view and a lot of the puzzle was rooted in Christianity. The Columbus Code is well deserving of a 5 star ranking. Great plot, characters, suspense, and the author's expertise on foreign matters comes through as well as the research he had to have done for such a book as this. The book takes the reader from the US to Barcelona Spain, to Israel, and back to the US while keeping the reader well entertained and on the edge of their seat with suspense. As far as I can tell, this is Evan's first foray into fiction, and it is a great start. The book ends well, but I got the idea there could be a possible sequel. I hope there is, for it would be worth reading more about the Columbus Code.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Winfield

    What would you do if you found out you were related to Christopher Columbus and were the only one that could solve a mystery. This includes many adventures with John Wintes, a secret service agent, his daughter, Maria, and Sophia. This was a great story. i look forward to many more adventures with these three characters and hope to find out if they can figure out how close they really are to Columbus. I received this book from worthy publishing for a fair and honest opinion.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    2.5 stars. I received this book for free from Goodreads Giveaway. This book was ok, I enjoyed it, but it definitely took a bit to get into. It promised a fast paced story and I just found that it wasn't that at all. I would recommend it to a friend who likes a "scavenger" hunt type of book. 2.5 stars. I received this book for free from Goodreads Giveaway. This book was ok, I enjoyed it, but it definitely took a bit to get into. It promised a fast paced story and I just found that it wasn't that at all. I would recommend it to a friend who likes a "scavenger" hunt type of book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    I enjoyed this book and look forward to a second one. It wasn't well written, however, the story kept my interest peaked and I liked the dynamics of the characters. I enjoyed this book and look forward to a second one. It wasn't well written, however, the story kept my interest peaked and I liked the dynamics of the characters.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    Couldn't even finish it. Didn't like any of the characters or the story. Couldn't even finish it. Didn't like any of the characters or the story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    Don't bother. Thought it would be more about Columbus. Don't bother. Thought it would be more about Columbus.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Arabela Rodrigues

  23. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Smith

  25. 5 out of 5

    Neal Fant

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erica

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steven Ridgely

  28. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  29. 5 out of 5

    Manan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cyber

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