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Rhythm, Music, and the Brain: Scientific Foundations and Clinical Applications

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With the advent of modern cognitive neuroscience and new tools of studying the human brain live, music as a highly complex, temporally ordered and rule-based sensory language quickly became a fascinating topic of study. The question of how music moves us, stimulates our thoughts, feelings, and kinesthetic sense, and how it can reach the human experience in profound ways is With the advent of modern cognitive neuroscience and new tools of studying the human brain live, music as a highly complex, temporally ordered and rule-based sensory language quickly became a fascinating topic of study. The question of how music moves us, stimulates our thoughts, feelings, and kinesthetic sense, and how it can reach the human experience in profound ways is now measured with the advent of modern cognitive neuroscience. The goal of Rhythm, Music and the Brain is an attempt to bring the knowledge of the arts and the sciences and review our current state of study about the brain and music, specifically rhythm. The author provides a thorough examination of the current state of research, including the biomedical applications of neurological music therapy in sensorimotor speech and cognitive rehabilitation. This book will be of interest for the lay and professional reader in the sciences and arts as well as the professionals in the fields of neuroscientific research, medicine, and rehabilitation.


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With the advent of modern cognitive neuroscience and new tools of studying the human brain live, music as a highly complex, temporally ordered and rule-based sensory language quickly became a fascinating topic of study. The question of how music moves us, stimulates our thoughts, feelings, and kinesthetic sense, and how it can reach the human experience in profound ways is With the advent of modern cognitive neuroscience and new tools of studying the human brain live, music as a highly complex, temporally ordered and rule-based sensory language quickly became a fascinating topic of study. The question of how music moves us, stimulates our thoughts, feelings, and kinesthetic sense, and how it can reach the human experience in profound ways is now measured with the advent of modern cognitive neuroscience. The goal of Rhythm, Music and the Brain is an attempt to bring the knowledge of the arts and the sciences and review our current state of study about the brain and music, specifically rhythm. The author provides a thorough examination of the current state of research, including the biomedical applications of neurological music therapy in sensorimotor speech and cognitive rehabilitation. This book will be of interest for the lay and professional reader in the sciences and arts as well as the professionals in the fields of neuroscientific research, medicine, and rehabilitation.

52 review for Rhythm, Music, and the Brain: Scientific Foundations and Clinical Applications

  1. 5 out of 5

    kaelan

    There's a conception of the scientist as a lone, Einsteinian-type figure, bravely forging his way into the intellectual unknown. In truth, however, science proceeds along at a far more modest pace. A team of researchers might observe a relation between, say, music therapy and stroke-victim rehabilitation. Another scientist, working in a slightly different field, hypothesizes that the mental hardware used for processing rhythmic cues involves motor neurons. Someone else draws an inference between There's a conception of the scientist as a lone, Einsteinian-type figure, bravely forging his way into the intellectual unknown. In truth, however, science proceeds along at a far more modest pace. A team of researchers might observe a relation between, say, music therapy and stroke-victim rehabilitation. Another scientist, working in a slightly different field, hypothesizes that the mental hardware used for processing rhythmic cues involves motor neurons. Someone else draws an inference between the two. So on and so forth. Hence why legitimate scientific texts, such as Michael H. Thaut's Rhythm, Music, and the Brain: Scientific Foundations and Clinical Applications, often reach such admirable levels of rigour. But for someone like myself, who was raised on the pop-science gems of A Brief History of Time and A Short History of Nearly Everything, it also explains why legitimate scientific texts can be so awfully dull to read. Rhythm, Music, and the Brain, which surveys the present state of rhythm-related neuroscientific research, is divided into nine chapters; but unless you're a neuroscientist or a neurologic music therapist (yes, it's a real job title), most of the interesting content falls within the first three. In these, Thaut explains which musical concepts (beat, pulses, meter, etc.) hold neurological significance. Pretty neat stuff, actually. And he also provides a fascinating overview of musical aesthetics, ranging from Kantianism to more recent attempts at psychobiology. (He even reads Kant's categories as an anticipation of later psychobiological accounts of perception, an interpretation which is as enticing as it is most definitely inaccurate.) The remainder of the book is spent investigating the therapeutic and medicinal applications of the neuroscience of music. Here, Thaut presents his claims systematically, rigorously and (surprise, surprise) tediously, as the following passage amply demonstrates: The periods of rhythmic stimuli and their corresponding responses play a dominant role in the planning and execution of motor events. Evidence for this comes from several sources. The fact that a constraint on the response period (as provided by the stimulus period) results in a well-defined optimization problem allows for a mathematical analysis that results in the complete specification of the three-dimensional coordinates of an upper-extremity movement trajectory. Thus, the result of study 1, in which mid-arc position variability is decreased, is a natural outcome of the response period constraint provided by the metronome. Perhaps I really need to revise my policy of finishing every single book that I start. In any case, Rhythm, Music, and the Brain, which I would often pick up for some late-night reading, boasts the auxiliary function of being quite the effective sleep-aid.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Callie

    A great reference on how sound induces and shapes movement. Scientific studies on how the injured brain that engages in music can be changed by that experience.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Grimaldi

  5. 5 out of 5

    MJ

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    Maggie Grube

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  9. 5 out of 5

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  10. 4 out of 5

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  11. 4 out of 5

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  12. 4 out of 5

    J.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dirk

  14. 4 out of 5

    Beth Hampshire

  15. 4 out of 5

    Miles Warner

  16. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan Denton

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karina

  18. 5 out of 5

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  19. 5 out of 5

    Ron Tintner

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jel Bean

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bethberman

  22. 5 out of 5

    Yeonhwa

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ella

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

  25. 4 out of 5

    Iwallisasu.edu

  26. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Gilbert

  28. 5 out of 5

    Noah Latchem

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

  30. 5 out of 5

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  31. 5 out of 5

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  32. 5 out of 5

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  33. 5 out of 5

    Curtis

  34. 4 out of 5

    David Dickinson

  35. 5 out of 5

    Fleur Helmink

  36. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  37. 4 out of 5

    Floietoss

  38. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  39. 4 out of 5

    P. Es

  40. 5 out of 5

    Darci

  41. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

  42. 4 out of 5

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  43. 4 out of 5

    David Rubenstein

  44. 4 out of 5

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  45. 4 out of 5

    Malia

  46. 5 out of 5

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  47. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Noel Veteto

  48. 5 out of 5

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  49. 4 out of 5

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  50. 4 out of 5

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  51. 4 out of 5

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  52. 5 out of 5

    Billy

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