website statistics Sword Art Online Progressive Manga, Vol. 1 - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Sword Art Online Progressive Manga, Vol. 1

Availability: Ready to download

Yuuki Asuna was a top student who spent her days at cram school and preparing for her high school entrance exams--but that was before she borrowed her brother's virtual reality game system and wound up trapped in Sword Art Online with ten thousand other frightened players. As time passes, Asuna fears what will become of her life outside the fantasy realm--the failure she m Yuuki Asuna was a top student who spent her days at cram school and preparing for her high school entrance exams--but that was before she borrowed her brother's virtual reality game system and wound up trapped in Sword Art Online with ten thousand other frightened players. As time passes, Asuna fears what will become of her life outside the fantasy realm--the failure she might seem in the eyes of her peers and parents. Unwilling to wait on the sidelines for more experienced gamers to beat the game, Asuna employs her study habits to learn the mechanics of game--and swordplay. Her swiftness impresses Kirito, a pro gamer who invites Asuna to join the best players on the front lines. Is Asuna ready to swap class rankings for player rankings and join Kirito?


Compare

Yuuki Asuna was a top student who spent her days at cram school and preparing for her high school entrance exams--but that was before she borrowed her brother's virtual reality game system and wound up trapped in Sword Art Online with ten thousand other frightened players. As time passes, Asuna fears what will become of her life outside the fantasy realm--the failure she m Yuuki Asuna was a top student who spent her days at cram school and preparing for her high school entrance exams--but that was before she borrowed her brother's virtual reality game system and wound up trapped in Sword Art Online with ten thousand other frightened players. As time passes, Asuna fears what will become of her life outside the fantasy realm--the failure she might seem in the eyes of her peers and parents. Unwilling to wait on the sidelines for more experienced gamers to beat the game, Asuna employs her study habits to learn the mechanics of game--and swordplay. Her swiftness impresses Kirito, a pro gamer who invites Asuna to join the best players on the front lines. Is Asuna ready to swap class rankings for player rankings and join Kirito?

30 review for Sword Art Online Progressive Manga, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    Impressive artwork, and a great story. Could have done without the sultry bathtub scene, though...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jorge Desormeaux

    Princess in need of rescue looking for reliable knight I have mixed feelings about this manga. On the one hand the artist is the impeccable Himura Kiseki (Fate Stay Night fans should check out his Sword Dancers dōjinshi) and reading the manga is an aesthetic treat. On the other hand, while the story is told from Asuna's point of view it drastically undermines her confidence and competence compared to the original Sword Art Online story: she relies on Kirito to save her life twice in just this firs Princess in need of rescue looking for reliable knight I have mixed feelings about this manga. On the one hand the artist is the impeccable Himura Kiseki (Fate Stay Night fans should check out his Sword Dancers dōjinshi) and reading the manga is an aesthetic treat. On the other hand, while the story is told from Asuna's point of view it drastically undermines her confidence and competence compared to the original Sword Art Online story: she relies on Kirito to save her life twice in just this first volume, someone else has to teach her the basics of SAO, she relies on Kirito for basic necessities like food and lodging, etc. People even call her princess and Kirito is named her knight. The implied meaning—that Asuna needs him to protect her—is unfortunately accurate. The first story arc of SAO (the anime) is remarkable for creating in Asuna a female lead that is the equal of the protagonist: she's just as skilled, spirited and capable as he is. One could argue that it's Kirito who relies on her emotionally. Subsequent seasons prove that the author had no idea to what he was on to, reducing Asuna to a helpless princess in a cage to be exhibited and molested by the antagonist, and then a secondary character (a healer, of all things!) who is sent to the background so that Kirito can get on with enlarging his (by then considerable) harem. It's a shame that this manga continues the trend of making Asuna into a girl that needs saving.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Selena

    Uh... What's so "progressive" about this manga? It's certainly not treatment of female gamers. They didn't say "tits or gtfo" but they might as well have. They treat Asuna as a "princess" (the Princess Peach kind, not the Sailor Moon Princess kind). They size up her "cute" factor and are checking out her figure before they even consider that she's there to fight, not to get a boyfriend. And while I don't mind her needing to learn the basics from someone (I play games all the time and would need h Uh... What's so "progressive" about this manga? It's certainly not treatment of female gamers. They didn't say "tits or gtfo" but they might as well have. They treat Asuna as a "princess" (the Princess Peach kind, not the Sailor Moon Princess kind). They size up her "cute" factor and are checking out her figure before they even consider that she's there to fight, not to get a boyfriend. And while I don't mind her needing to learn the basics from someone (I play games all the time and would need help understanding the SAO system), they essentially defanged her by making her need to rely on Kirito for information she already knew in the original SAO, like switching. That's right, they retconned her to know less, not more. The progressiveness doesn't come form treatment of female characters either. Besides the fact that other characters treat Asuna as Princess Peach, Himura-sensei basically treats Asuna as a sex object. There's a shower scene in which Asuna essentially does a strip tease before sexily climbing into the bath to sexily shower and sexily moan at the feeling of being clean. Not only that, Asuna seems more embarrassed than offended at the informant saying she was going to sell information on what underwear she's buying, like that's perfectly normal. So about the only thing I see as "progressive" with this manga is that the main character is female, but considering she's just treated as fanservice for the most part, that's hardly progressive at all. I was hoping for Asuna back story and Asuna awesomeness. What I got was Princess Peach swinging around a sword like she knows what she's doing until Kirito shows up to save her sorry butt. ASUNA'S AN AMAZINGLY STRONG GAMER! WHY MUST YOU TREAT HER LIKE A DAMSEL IN DISTRESS SEX SYMBOL?! (Anyway, the art is nice but for the obvious attempts at fan service and the story, like the original, is good but for the obvious attempts at making Asuna a weaker character)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Sigh, rant time yet again on another SAO book. Ugghhh. Again, I love the idea of SAO! And wish it could be drawn and written in a way that could appeal equally for everyone... But yeeesh. This was even worse than the light novel I tried previously as far as seemingly existing merely to subjugate Asuna (the main female character) and make her as helpless yet "sexy" as possible. Her very character is a contradiction: she's supposedly an incredible, strong warrior "DESPITE being a cute girl" (becaus Sigh, rant time yet again on another SAO book. Ugghhh. Again, I love the idea of SAO! And wish it could be drawn and written in a way that could appeal equally for everyone... But yeeesh. This was even worse than the light novel I tried previously as far as seemingly existing merely to subjugate Asuna (the main female character) and make her as helpless yet "sexy" as possible. Her very character is a contradiction: she's supposedly an incredible, strong warrior "DESPITE being a cute girl" (because of course one cannot be both), yet at the same time she's a lost and confused puppy, vitally needing the males in the story to educate her and lead her in everything. The manga was even worse than the light novel in this and obviously drawn for the hetero-male gaze, including a new scene involving a naked Asuna enjoying a bath for several pages, for absolutely no reason but for the sake of more nude drawings. If you enjoy these, hey, you do you. Lord knows I have plenty of guilty-pleasure reads myself! I really wanted to be able to enjoy these. Unfortunately though I just can't continue with either series for all the reasons I've ranted about. As a proud female nerd and gamer myself, I find them really insulting, sexist, and uncomfortable.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Zamora

    I’m honestly surprised by the manga. It is so different compared to the anime and I’m surprised by what I didn’t know. I enjoyed reading the manga because it was my first and it was okay because it wasn’t too interesting to me but perhaps the others will

  6. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Pacific

    I think what really pulled me into this was that it was all these people being pulled into a video game and doing a sort of roleplay. I'm a big fan of roleplay, so I naturally fell into it. I worked voluntarily at my school library. Someone brought it back and I was checking it in. The moment I saw the cover, I set it to the side so I could read it after I had done my job. When my work was done, I opened it and naturally became a fan. I think what really pulled me into this was that it was all these people being pulled into a video game and doing a sort of roleplay. I'm a big fan of roleplay, so I naturally fell into it. I worked voluntarily at my school library. Someone brought it back and I was checking it in. The moment I saw the cover, I set it to the side so I could read it after I had done my job. When my work was done, I opened it and naturally became a fan.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Luchies

    VERY good read. Retells SAO from Asuna's perspective, providing a very interesting take on the series. VERY good read. Retells SAO from Asuna's perspective, providing a very interesting take on the series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Kauderer

    I love this. Makes me think fondly of the first season of the anime. They did a great job of having a character driven story <3

  9. 5 out of 5

    MC

    Sword Art Online Progressive is a series of novels and manga in the SAO universe that tells an alternative story of the Aincrad Arc that began the series. I greatly enjoyed the manga for the most part. I liked how Asuna and Kirito were both made out to be more human, or at least we saw the human side of them. This is opposed to the main series where, other than some loneliness issues, the were just short of Mary Asuna and Marty Kirito. Obviously they are still really powerful characters. They hav Sword Art Online Progressive is a series of novels and manga in the SAO universe that tells an alternative story of the Aincrad Arc that began the series. I greatly enjoyed the manga for the most part. I liked how Asuna and Kirito were both made out to be more human, or at least we saw the human side of them. This is opposed to the main series where, other than some loneliness issues, the were just short of Mary Asuna and Marty Kirito. Obviously they are still really powerful characters. They have to be to have the impact on the game and thus the story line that they do here. But they are a little less perfect seeming and a little less suave than the original story. That and the reactions to them aren't "fall over yourself" lust for the pure awesomeness of the characters. Well, other than a jab against gamers and nerds that the author put in the story. The story also fills in details that were missing with the huge time-skip in the original arc. The second light novel dealt with this somewhat, but this manga does so much more in-depth. It is a time period ripe for stories. My only real dislike is the character of Agil. I agree with his basic point against the asshole Kibaou, but the way he put it was not helpful at all. After pointing out how the beta testers had done what they could to help others, he says something about how the players who died so far died because of not treating the situation seriously enough. Perhaps he was right, but the way he put it came across as victim blaming. It doesn't matter if they took it "seriously" enough or not. They would not have died if not for the fucking psycopath who trapped them. Maybe it's a cultural thing but that did sound like insensitive victim-blaming. I likely am misinterpreting it. Even so, that soured me on that part of the manga. I don't know if it's a cultural thing, poor writing, or what. Despite the above, I really loved the story, the artwork, and the more nuanced portrayals of the leads. I can't wait until the other characters appear in future volumes. Highly Recommended.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Wow, totally Loved it! So good! Love Sword Art Online & really cool side stories too! Love Kirito & Asuna together omg & really enjoyed season 1 of the anime & am currently watching season 2 & Love it so far! : ) definitely recommend this manga & anime series! : )

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I read Sword Art Online Progressive because I heard it was going to try to fix the issues with the original Sword Art Online story. The short answer? It didn't. Which is disappointing because the premise of the original is so great, I keep waiting for someone to do it justice. But this series isn't it. It even went so far as to weaken Asuna's character (one of the only redeeming qualities of the original), making her a damsel in need of rescuing not once, but twice in this volume alone. What happ I read Sword Art Online Progressive because I heard it was going to try to fix the issues with the original Sword Art Online story. The short answer? It didn't. Which is disappointing because the premise of the original is so great, I keep waiting for someone to do it justice. But this series isn't it. It even went so far as to weaken Asuna's character (one of the only redeeming qualities of the original), making her a damsel in need of rescuing not once, but twice in this volume alone. What happened to the awesome girl from the original? She's been turned into the usual run-of-the-mill anime chick, right down to the gratuitous naked-in-the-bathtub scene. This series also doesn't stand on its own. If you haven't read/watched the original Sword Art Online, you are going to be seriously lost. It doesn't go into any details about the game, how the players are trapped, or how the players are supposed to get out. Without starting from scratch, it created inconsistencies. Can we take this series away from Reki Kawahara and give it to someone else? Please?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Sword Art Online is a series written by Reki Kawahara about a virtual reality game called Sword Art Online (SAO), with the only difference being that if you die in-game, the Nervegear, a helmet that must be worn to launch the game, will release electricity that will kill you in real life. There is no way to escape, and there are 10,000 people trapped in the game. According to the creator of the game, Akihiko Kaiyaba, you can only escape by beating the game, which is the 100th floor. The main cha Sword Art Online is a series written by Reki Kawahara about a virtual reality game called Sword Art Online (SAO), with the only difference being that if you die in-game, the Nervegear, a helmet that must be worn to launch the game, will release electricity that will kill you in real life. There is no way to escape, and there are 10,000 people trapped in the game. According to the creator of the game, Akihiko Kaiyaba, you can only escape by beating the game, which is the 100th floor. The main character is named Kazuto Kirigaya, with his in-game name being Kirito. He would later become one of the two strongest players in the game. The story does not feel well-written, as most of it is an introduction to characters that aren’t exactly relevant, even in the series after SAO. For example. A character named Lizabeth- she was a weaponsmith who helped Kirito create a sword, but she required a rare material. Kirito and Lizabeth went to get it and succeeded. Their relationship was pretty bad when it started but it built up towards the end. However, Lizabeth did not appear anywhere else in the story besides this. The only she made an appearance was at the end of the series, and another at the end of the sequel to Sword Art Online. The most common order in the story is that Kirito meets a character, helps the character while building a good relationship with them, leave the character and never see them until the end of the series. Sometimes, however, the characters introduced even die in the same volume that they were introduced in, but the majority survives. There are few parts that seem to push the story forward, while the rest seems to be parts just to extend the story further. Without these parts, the story would be about 25 pages while it is an 18 volume series. Of course, some parts actually drive the story forward- Kirito joining a major guild, dealing with a murderer guild called Laughing Coffin, and working with the offensive team- a group of players who want to get out of the world by continuing to push forward. Overall, it is a fun series to read, but I would not recommend this to someone who enjoys books with a deep story. It has a story, but most do not connect to much else in the story. The basic story is rather unique, and there is a good amount of action, but also some romance. In the end, it’s an interesting book and I’d recommend it as an easy read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Edward Joseph

    Asuna in the days before she became the waifu... Unlike the light novel the manga opened from Asuna's perspective, a breather. It covers up to the rising action of the Floor 1 Boss fight, nearly a quarter of the light novel counterpart but with some original material at the side. Asuna's first impression as the fast-learning, efficient lone wolf from Volume is further retconned for emphasizing that she's merely a top-A student, who just happened to be trapped in a death game after trying something Asuna in the days before she became the waifu... Unlike the light novel the manga opened from Asuna's perspective, a breather. It covers up to the rising action of the Floor 1 Boss fight, nearly a quarter of the light novel counterpart but with some original material at the side. Asuna's first impression as the fast-learning, efficient lone wolf from Volume is further retconned for emphasizing that she's merely a top-A student, who just happened to be trapped in a death game after trying something out of her character. Her habit of achieving the top rank became her reason to strive in the game. Kirito's presentation is different, in a way that he's the secondary protagonist. The slower pace of the manga is good enough for expanding the Aincrad arc's universe and build-up. With a pinch of skin revealing here and there. Volume 1 ended with enough hype for Kirito's character to fully shine in the next volume.

  14. 4 out of 5

    ribbonknight

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Firstly, I mistakenly thought I was checking out the light novel from the library, so was disappointed this was in fact the manga. (Also when will my library get Mother's Rosary?!) I'd been excited to read the Progressive arc because it was going to be the Aincrad arc from Asuna's pov. When she meets Kirito, she's his equal in speed and skill. Unfortunately, they retcon her growth as a warrior and make her reliant for Kirito for knowledge of how to play the game, what weapons to use, etc. Plus a Firstly, I mistakenly thought I was checking out the light novel from the library, so was disappointed this was in fact the manga. (Also when will my library get Mother's Rosary?!) I'd been excited to read the Progressive arc because it was going to be the Aincrad arc from Asuna's pov. When she meets Kirito, she's his equal in speed and skill. Unfortunately, they retcon her growth as a warrior and make her reliant for Kirito for knowledge of how to play the game, what weapons to use, etc. Plus a multi-page bath scene to titillate the reader. This is the kind of damsel in distress bullshit I dropped Fairy Dance for, and incredibly disappointing for me as someone who was hoping for some great characterization of the bamf Asuna.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    I grabbed this one from the library for the summer reading program and because I had heard good things about the anime. Fits the current trend of LitRPG, where people get pulled into games and have to figure out how to survive and progress. Cool story, good art. Probably won’t continue the manga because it got a little too “fan-servicey” (read: section 4 was scandalous enough that I might not hand the book to most teens). It does make me more inclined to read other books in the genre and to chec I grabbed this one from the library for the summer reading program and because I had heard good things about the anime. Fits the current trend of LitRPG, where people get pulled into games and have to figure out how to survive and progress. Cool story, good art. Probably won’t continue the manga because it got a little too “fan-servicey” (read: section 4 was scandalous enough that I might not hand the book to most teens). It does make me more inclined to read other books in the genre and to check out the anime. Rating: a heavier PG-13 for some fairly suggestive illustrations in one portion.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    More of a 3.5, but I'm such a sucker for the series I have to bump it to a 4. I'm super happy to get more Asuna and I really enjoyed this. They did make some interesting changes though. I can see why they did this, with the audience they're shooting at and the practicality of certain scene changes for layout/artwork. So a lot of the adjustments I didn't mind at all. In fact since I grew up on shojo manga/comics and they played into those tropes and styles I ate those up. But some people may not e More of a 3.5, but I'm such a sucker for the series I have to bump it to a 4. I'm super happy to get more Asuna and I really enjoyed this. They did make some interesting changes though. I can see why they did this, with the audience they're shooting at and the practicality of certain scene changes for layout/artwork. So a lot of the adjustments I didn't mind at all. In fact since I grew up on shojo manga/comics and they played into those tropes and styles I ate those up. But some people may not enjoy them.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Hesseling

    I actually really liked this manga. I've pretty much just started out reading them, and having just finished two that were alright, I was really surprised how much I liked this one. I love playing MMORPG games so this was right up my alley. And honestly, I'd probably be just as lost as her being in the game itself. The story is great, it goes right into the thick of it and leaves you to learn things along the way. I actually really liked this manga. I've pretty much just started out reading them, and having just finished two that were alright, I was really surprised how much I liked this one. I love playing MMORPG games so this was right up my alley. And honestly, I'd probably be just as lost as her being in the game itself. The story is great, it goes right into the thick of it and leaves you to learn things along the way.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eddie Maybury

    Trapped in a video game where death in the game means death in the real world. I've seen the Netflix series of this already, but the extra detail and background here is awesome. Some transitions were sudden to the point where a new scene would begin and it would take me a second to notice. This could probably be normal for image grid novels, but it still threw me off a bit. Reading from right to left also takes some getting used to. A solid quick read. Trapped in a video game where death in the game means death in the real world. I've seen the Netflix series of this already, but the extra detail and background here is awesome. Some transitions were sudden to the point where a new scene would begin and it would take me a second to notice. This could probably be normal for image grid novels, but it still threw me off a bit. Reading from right to left also takes some getting used to. A solid quick read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    The progressive series is a retelling of the SAO Aincrad storyline, but from Asuna's perspective. It fills in the many gaps from the time hops of the original. There are only 5 volumes out so far, which takes us to the third floor of Aincrad. I highly recommend reading them if you enjoy SAO, especially if you wanted to see more of Asuna. The progressive series is a retelling of the SAO Aincrad storyline, but from Asuna's perspective. It fills in the many gaps from the time hops of the original. There are only 5 volumes out so far, which takes us to the third floor of Aincrad. I highly recommend reading them if you enjoy SAO, especially if you wanted to see more of Asuna.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cheshire

    Um, when I read the blurb I thought it was about Asuna and how she came to Sword Art Online, not a prequel that is filled with over the line imagery. Really, it was like Rosario and Vampire. A bit to much for show.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany May

    I’m a fan of SAO and have watched all the anime arcs and the one movie out at the moment and I really enjoyed this and will continue to read the following volumes. Progressive retells SAO but from Asuna’s point of view and fills in extra gaps between the main story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Fischer

    I don’t read many graphic novels, and this is my first manga. Although it’s not my thing, I have great appreciation and respect for the genre for the artistry that goes into it and for its appeal to young adult readers.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jasmijn Distelvelt

    I loved this version of sao already, this is the story I've been waiting for. There is already so much more character development than in the original. I love how not only Kirito's side get told but also Asuna's side. I loved this version of sao already, this is the story I've been waiting for. There is already so much more character development than in the original. I love how not only Kirito's side get told but also Asuna's side.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hiriana Rodriguez

    I liked this anime so much when I watched it in the past month that I wanted to read the manga to know more about the characters and everything. However, it is so different compared to it. I think the manga is more based on Asuna’s perspective and the art is extraordinary! :)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sidney (aka Sidsbooks)

    I absolutely love the anime, Sword Art Online. The concept is incredibly haunting yet super intriguing. Diving into this manga has been incredibly great as it's written from the perspective of Asuna. And she really is just the best! I absolutely love the anime, Sword Art Online. The concept is incredibly haunting yet super intriguing. Diving into this manga has been incredibly great as it's written from the perspective of Asuna. And she really is just the best!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Wade K Smith

    First manga of SAO prog light novels It's an adaptation of the light novel storyline, with much more emphasis on Asuna's viewpoint, and it has truly awesome art. First manga of SAO prog light novels It's an adaptation of the light novel storyline, with much more emphasis on Asuna's viewpoint, and it has truly awesome art.

  27. 5 out of 5

    JMcDaniel

    Hi this is good ok bye

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dominique

    It’s good to be back to this series. The art is really smooth and the story is very unique. I’m excited to see what will be different between this and the anime

  29. 4 out of 5

    Logan Leurquin

    it was a good manga it did a good job of showing what has happened in the past of the manga.

  30. 4 out of 5

    jonna nicole

    Biased rating, thoroughly enjoy Sword Art Online.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.