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A Treasury of Modern Fantasy

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Contents include: Timothy by Keith Roberts / Jeffy Is Five by Harlan Ellison / The Rag Thing by Donald A. Wolheim / Thirteen O'Clock by C. M. Kornbluth / Trouble with Water by H. L. Gold / The Woman of the Wood by A. Merritt / The Rats in the Walls by H. P. Lovecraft / Sail On! Sail On! by Philip Jose Farmer / The Loom of Darkness by Jack Vance / The Hellbound Train by Rob Contents include: Timothy by Keith Roberts / Jeffy Is Five by Harlan Ellison / The Rag Thing by Donald A. Wolheim / Thirteen O'Clock by C. M. Kornbluth / Trouble with Water by H. L. Gold / The Woman of the Wood by A. Merritt / The Rats in the Walls by H. P. Lovecraft / Sail On! Sail On! by Philip Jose Farmer / The Loom of Darkness by Jack Vance / The Hellbound Train by Robert Bloch / Come and Go Mad by Fredric Brown / Narrow Valley by R. A. Lafferty / Divine Madness by Roger Zelazny / Longtooth by Edgar Pangborn / Man Overboard by John Collier / Descending by Thomas M. Disch / My Dear Emily by Joanna Russ / Our Fair City by Robert A. Heinlein / They Bite by Anthony Boucher / Call Him Demon by Henry Kuttner / Daemon by C. L. Moore / There Shall Be No Darkness by James Blish / The Coming of the White Worm by Clark Ashton Smith / One Ordinary Day, with Peanuts by Shirley Jackson / Piper at the Gates of Dawn by Richard Cowper / Nine Yards of Other Cloth by Manly Wade Wellman / Yesterday Was Monday by Theodore Sturgeon / Through a Glass - Darkly by Zenna Henderson / The Montavarde Camera by Avram Davidson / Within the Walls of Tyre by Michael Bishop / Four Ghosts in Hamlet by Fritz Leiber / Displaced Person by Eric Frank Russell / The Black Ferris by Ray Bradbury.


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Contents include: Timothy by Keith Roberts / Jeffy Is Five by Harlan Ellison / The Rag Thing by Donald A. Wolheim / Thirteen O'Clock by C. M. Kornbluth / Trouble with Water by H. L. Gold / The Woman of the Wood by A. Merritt / The Rats in the Walls by H. P. Lovecraft / Sail On! Sail On! by Philip Jose Farmer / The Loom of Darkness by Jack Vance / The Hellbound Train by Rob Contents include: Timothy by Keith Roberts / Jeffy Is Five by Harlan Ellison / The Rag Thing by Donald A. Wolheim / Thirteen O'Clock by C. M. Kornbluth / Trouble with Water by H. L. Gold / The Woman of the Wood by A. Merritt / The Rats in the Walls by H. P. Lovecraft / Sail On! Sail On! by Philip Jose Farmer / The Loom of Darkness by Jack Vance / The Hellbound Train by Robert Bloch / Come and Go Mad by Fredric Brown / Narrow Valley by R. A. Lafferty / Divine Madness by Roger Zelazny / Longtooth by Edgar Pangborn / Man Overboard by John Collier / Descending by Thomas M. Disch / My Dear Emily by Joanna Russ / Our Fair City by Robert A. Heinlein / They Bite by Anthony Boucher / Call Him Demon by Henry Kuttner / Daemon by C. L. Moore / There Shall Be No Darkness by James Blish / The Coming of the White Worm by Clark Ashton Smith / One Ordinary Day, with Peanuts by Shirley Jackson / Piper at the Gates of Dawn by Richard Cowper / Nine Yards of Other Cloth by Manly Wade Wellman / Yesterday Was Monday by Theodore Sturgeon / Through a Glass - Darkly by Zenna Henderson / The Montavarde Camera by Avram Davidson / Within the Walls of Tyre by Michael Bishop / Four Ghosts in Hamlet by Fritz Leiber / Displaced Person by Eric Frank Russell / The Black Ferris by Ray Bradbury.

30 review for A Treasury of Modern Fantasy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    I read this collection of stories late in grade school and blame it partly for my desire to write and tell stories. The lone copy at my hometown library came and stayed with me multiple times; had I been a more crooked kid, I would've stolen it outright and lied that I'd lost it. But at some point I forgot the exact title and instead thought of it as the book with this story and that story in it. Eventually, I lost track of the book for several years, realized I'd forgotten about it, and then fr I read this collection of stories late in grade school and blame it partly for my desire to write and tell stories. The lone copy at my hometown library came and stayed with me multiple times; had I been a more crooked kid, I would've stolen it outright and lied that I'd lost it. But at some point I forgot the exact title and instead thought of it as the book with this story and that story in it. Eventually, I lost track of the book for several years, realized I'd forgotten about it, and then frittered away many minutes beating my head against the wall and turning over every Internet-based stone I could think of to find the book again. Dumb luck put me on the second floor of a used bookstore in Chicago about a decade ago; I crouched down to scan a shelf of titles, and there was my paperbound beloved, yellowing quietly on the shelf, then in my hands, mine again. The stories still hold up, truly odd and slightly clunky though some of them are. The ones that freaked me out as a kid chill me even worse now because I understand their nuances more. The ones that tugged my imagination into new shapes now make my thoughts vine with story ideas. In short, I adore this book and hold it partly responsible for the wonderfully weird things I think even today.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Buhs

    A superior collection, even if it is dated. Part of it being dated is good: I love the cover, which is so 70s and 80s. (Carlos Castanada, anyone?) Part of it is dated by design. It's meant to be a collection of stories culled from fantasy magazines. It's a retrospective. But this very notion of a collection is dated--the editor's for example, in their overall introduction and the introduction to the individual stories--are quick to point out the differences between fantasy and science fiction, a d A superior collection, even if it is dated. Part of it being dated is good: I love the cover, which is so 70s and 80s. (Carlos Castanada, anyone?) Part of it is dated by design. It's meant to be a collection of stories culled from fantasy magazines. It's a retrospective. But this very notion of a collection is dated--the editor's for example, in their overall introduction and the introduction to the individual stories--are quick to point out the differences between fantasy and science fiction, a divide that seems less german these days. And they don't make the same distinction with horror, though given the upsurge in horrific writing since the publication of this book--it came out in 1981--a newer version might be worried over that distinction: a lot of these are stories that would fall into the horror genre. It's also the case that the book dates itself by insisting upon certain kinds of fantasy magazines. By its reckoning, Weird Tales is the first fantasy magazine, and so the first couple of stories (and six overall) come from WT. A huge hunk, though, comes from The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction: 16 of the thirty three. The limits also mean some clunkers--Merrritt's "Woman of the Woods" is not his best, but his best was published in magazines not solely devoted to fantasy. There are some odd gaps in the chronology--presumably because the stories available in WT and MFSF were not so good at the time: there are no stories from 1927-1938, inclusive, 1953-54, , 56-57, 1971-1975. The editors are also clearly not big fans of the New Wave movement. There were stories by Zelazny--just a short one--Ellison (his great Jefty is Five)--and Michael Bishop--a story that wasn't even really a fantasy as much as a cruel joke--as well as one by Thomas Disch, but they seem short-shrifted. Most notable, of course, are the relative absence of women writers. Only four stories by my count, and none by Marion Zimmer Bradley. (There are no writers of color, either.) Reading these through there are the usual number of ups and downs, good stories and bad, but what most hit me was the consistent theme, throughout them all--the fear that something was preventing reproduction, the continuation of gene lines or families or whole worlds. I suppose this is a holdover of Gothic conventions, but it was nonetheless striking. (Also striking how young many of the writers died. Maybe they had a reason to worry!)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Muzzlehatch

    Overall an excellent introduction to (mostly American) magazine science fiction from the beginnings of 'Weird Tales' and it's stars HP Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith in the 20s up through the 1970s and the continuing dominance of 'The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction' in the field. The selection is excellent overall, there are few if any duds here, but I do have a couple of caveats, namely that the book might have done better to have chosen some longer stories in the case of certain wri Overall an excellent introduction to (mostly American) magazine science fiction from the beginnings of 'Weird Tales' and it's stars HP Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith in the 20s up through the 1970s and the continuing dominance of 'The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction' in the field. The selection is excellent overall, there are few if any duds here, but I do have a couple of caveats, namely that the book might have done better to have chosen some longer stories in the case of certain writers (Lovecraft and Sturgeon are not at their best here IMO with their quite short contributions), and the selections overall are just a might too familiar. Do HPL, Ray Bradbury and Shirley Jackson really need to be here at all? Given the stated restriction to magazine fantasy, perhaps a selection of lesser-known, even forgotten names might have been of more use. But that's the POV of someone who is fairly cognizant of the history of the field; were I a little less knowledgeable, this would probably deserve a 5th star. Many of the stories are unquestionably classics -- my own faves are probably "Piper at the Gates of Dawn" by Richard Cowper and Harlan Ellison's masterpiece "Jeffty is Five."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Williwaw

    This is one of the most enjoyable short story anthologies I have ever read. Most of the selections are vintage tales from Weird Tales and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. I think the book came out in 1979 (or early 80's?), so the most up-to-date story is "Jefty is Five" by Harlan Ellison. So, think "pulp fiction," with a heavy emphasis on what is sometimes called "weird fiction." I read this cover to cover. I think there are about 30 stories and close to 700 pages altogether. Amazingly This is one of the most enjoyable short story anthologies I have ever read. Most of the selections are vintage tales from Weird Tales and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. I think the book came out in 1979 (or early 80's?), so the most up-to-date story is "Jefty is Five" by Harlan Ellison. So, think "pulp fiction," with a heavy emphasis on what is sometimes called "weird fiction." I read this cover to cover. I think there are about 30 stories and close to 700 pages altogether. Amazingly, there were only two or three duds in the whole lot. If you love short stories, you will love this book! It's out of print, so it's probably best sought after on ABE or another online book clearinghouse.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Grant Talabay

    An amazing collaboration of authors and subjects. Highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Robert Thomas

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Hertzog

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terri Ziemba

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lijo

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark Lucchesi

  11. 5 out of 5

    David Heffelfinger

  12. 5 out of 5

    KJ

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janis Ian

  14. 5 out of 5

    Foxinabox

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ca53buckeye

  16. 4 out of 5

    Timo Friedrich

  17. 5 out of 5

    Justine

  18. 4 out of 5

    David Nichols

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mushfique Fahim

  20. 4 out of 5

    David

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ernest Hilbert

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bad-at-reading

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ruby

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gaygeek

  26. 4 out of 5

    *Naomi*

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenelle

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Giordano

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

  30. 4 out of 5

    William Crosby

    I read through these and have decided that I simply don't like reading short stories. I prefer an extensive plot instead of gimmicks and cleverness. However I am not rating this because it would not be fair to judge the excellent writing on my dislike of a genre. I read through these and have decided that I simply don't like reading short stories. I prefer an extensive plot instead of gimmicks and cleverness. However I am not rating this because it would not be fair to judge the excellent writing on my dislike of a genre.

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