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All the Way

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It seemed as though nothing could stop Jordin Tootoo on the ice. The captain of Canada’s Under-18, a fan favourite on the World Junior squad, and a WHL top prospect who could intimidate both goalies and enforcers, he was always a leader. And when Tootoo was drafted by Nashville in 2000 and made the Predators out of camp in 2003, he became a leader in another way: the first It seemed as though nothing could stop Jordin Tootoo on the ice. The captain of Canada’s Under-18, a fan favourite on the World Junior squad, and a WHL top prospect who could intimidate both goalies and enforcers, he was always a leader. And when Tootoo was drafted by Nashville in 2000 and made the Predators out of camp in 2003, he became a leader in another way: the first player of Inuk descent to suit up in the NHL. The stress of competition in the world’s top hockey league, the travel, the media, the homesickness—and the added pressure to hold one’s head high as a role model not only for the young people of his hometown of Rankin Inlet but for the culture that had given him the strength and the opportunities to succeed—would have been more than enough to challenge any rookie. But Tootoo faced something far more difficult: the loss of his brother in the year between his draft and his first shift for the Predators. Though he played through it, the tragedy took its inevitable toll. In 2010, Tootoo checked himself into rehab for alcohol addiction. It seemed a promising career had ended too soon. But that’s not the way Tootoo saw it and not the way it would end. As heir to a cultural legacy that included alcohol, despair, and suicide, Tootoo could also draw on a heritage that could help sustain him even thousands of miles away from Nunavut. And in a community haunted by the same hopelessness and substance abuse that so affected Tootoo’s life, it is not just his skill and fearlessness on the ice that have made him a hero, but the courage of his honesty to himself and to the world around him that he needed to rely on others to sustain him through his toughest challenge. All the Way tells the story of someone who has travelled far from home to realize a dream, someone who has known glory and cheering crowds, but also the demons of despair. It is the searing, honest tale of a young man who has risen to every challenge and nearly fallen short in the toughest game of all, while finding a way to draw strength from his community and heritage, and giving back to it as well.


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It seemed as though nothing could stop Jordin Tootoo on the ice. The captain of Canada’s Under-18, a fan favourite on the World Junior squad, and a WHL top prospect who could intimidate both goalies and enforcers, he was always a leader. And when Tootoo was drafted by Nashville in 2000 and made the Predators out of camp in 2003, he became a leader in another way: the first It seemed as though nothing could stop Jordin Tootoo on the ice. The captain of Canada’s Under-18, a fan favourite on the World Junior squad, and a WHL top prospect who could intimidate both goalies and enforcers, he was always a leader. And when Tootoo was drafted by Nashville in 2000 and made the Predators out of camp in 2003, he became a leader in another way: the first player of Inuk descent to suit up in the NHL. The stress of competition in the world’s top hockey league, the travel, the media, the homesickness—and the added pressure to hold one’s head high as a role model not only for the young people of his hometown of Rankin Inlet but for the culture that had given him the strength and the opportunities to succeed—would have been more than enough to challenge any rookie. But Tootoo faced something far more difficult: the loss of his brother in the year between his draft and his first shift for the Predators. Though he played through it, the tragedy took its inevitable toll. In 2010, Tootoo checked himself into rehab for alcohol addiction. It seemed a promising career had ended too soon. But that’s not the way Tootoo saw it and not the way it would end. As heir to a cultural legacy that included alcohol, despair, and suicide, Tootoo could also draw on a heritage that could help sustain him even thousands of miles away from Nunavut. And in a community haunted by the same hopelessness and substance abuse that so affected Tootoo’s life, it is not just his skill and fearlessness on the ice that have made him a hero, but the courage of his honesty to himself and to the world around him that he needed to rely on others to sustain him through his toughest challenge. All the Way tells the story of someone who has travelled far from home to realize a dream, someone who has known glory and cheering crowds, but also the demons of despair. It is the searing, honest tale of a young man who has risen to every challenge and nearly fallen short in the toughest game of all, while finding a way to draw strength from his community and heritage, and giving back to it as well.

30 review for All the Way

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jolene

    It was interesting...and while he's certainly made a name for himself, given back to his community, and overcome some obstacles, a writer he is not. It was interesting...and while he's certainly made a name for himself, given back to his community, and overcome some obstacles, a writer he is not.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Geeks

    I finished this book quickly. Not bad but I found it repetitive.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Second time reading this book as a part of a book club I'm in. I enjoyed the experience of analyzing and discussing this book a lot. I wasn't very interested in the hockey aspects of this novel, but I did enjoy the discussions of mental health challenges and substance abuse problems Second time reading this book as a part of a book club I'm in. I enjoyed the experience of analyzing and discussing this book a lot. I wasn't very interested in the hockey aspects of this novel, but I did enjoy the discussions of mental health challenges and substance abuse problems

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darcy

    Very repetitious...too much profanity...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Gregory

    Powerful story. The strength, physical and mental, that this man has is incredible.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dsinglet

    Jordin writes a book that is very honest and courageous. An Inuit from Rankin Inlet, raised by alcoholic and abusive parents, he and his brother escape to the ice to get away from the craziness at home. They progress in their hockey playing into two tough and rough players. They eventually work their way South with hockey and as they stand on the threshold of NHL careers, Terry commits suicide. Jordin is left to carry on. He soon loses himself in grief, booze and women. He signs with Nashville t Jordin writes a book that is very honest and courageous. An Inuit from Rankin Inlet, raised by alcoholic and abusive parents, he and his brother escape to the ice to get away from the craziness at home. They progress in their hockey playing into two tough and rough players. They eventually work their way South with hockey and as they stand on the threshold of NHL careers, Terry commits suicide. Jordin is left to carry on. He soon loses himself in grief, booze and women. He signs with Nashville to become the first Inuit to play in the NHL. But his partying begins to affect his career and he is sent to rehab. This is perhaps the most honest account of a life I have read. It is written in his words and has the power of grace and courage of a survivor.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    I could have easily read this book cover to cover in one sitting. Toot is brutally honest about his life, from his upbringing to his path to addiction to his brother's suicide to his conduct on and off the ice. At times, it was hard to read given some of his references (in particular, the word 'broads' made me wince). But he is a brave man to lay his life bare while still in the throes of his career. He does not preach, he tells his story. And as the first Inuk player in the NHL, his story is en I could have easily read this book cover to cover in one sitting. Toot is brutally honest about his life, from his upbringing to his path to addiction to his brother's suicide to his conduct on and off the ice. At times, it was hard to read given some of his references (in particular, the word 'broads' made me wince). But he is a brave man to lay his life bare while still in the throes of his career. He does not preach, he tells his story. And as the first Inuk player in the NHL, his story is entirely its own. He is blazing a trail for young people from the north and showing them that if they have a passion they should follow it. Nothing is impossible. The writing leaves a little to be desired, but the result is the feeling that Tootoo is telling you his story in his own words. (less)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I inhaled this in two days and that was with trying to pace myself. Jordin makes me proud to be Canadian. He's honest in his story and his storytelling - his voice came through authentically, like that of every hockey player I've ever thrown a vodka-club at! His struggle with that ol' demon booze hit close to home as I'm also a Canadian Gen Yer who grew up in a war zone caused by it and then skated around my own addiction before Lohanning it to sobriety. I might be sort of in love with him but t I inhaled this in two days and that was with trying to pace myself. Jordin makes me proud to be Canadian. He's honest in his story and his storytelling - his voice came through authentically, like that of every hockey player I've ever thrown a vodka-club at! His struggle with that ol' demon booze hit close to home as I'm also a Canadian Gen Yer who grew up in a war zone caused by it and then skated around my own addiction before Lohanning it to sobriety. I might be sort of in love with him but thats beside the point...and probably has something to do with how he described my hometown arena with the word "Smarties".

  9. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Although I have much respect for the adversity he overcame in his life and the courage it takes to tell that story raw and unfiltered, the book was a little tepid. Yeah, I understand that sports guys swear but the constant gratuitous F-bombs were a distraction. As was the term "broad." Show some respect. The book was very repetitive in parts and not very well written. Kinda like a high schooler's essay "What I Wanna Be When I Grow Up." Pass on it. Although I have much respect for the adversity he overcame in his life and the courage it takes to tell that story raw and unfiltered, the book was a little tepid. Yeah, I understand that sports guys swear but the constant gratuitous F-bombs were a distraction. As was the term "broad." Show some respect. The book was very repetitive in parts and not very well written. Kinda like a high schooler's essay "What I Wanna Be When I Grow Up." Pass on it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Leanne Schneider

    This was a great book. I lived in Rankin Inlet, Churchill, Baker Lake, Yellowknife and Edmonton. All the places Jordin talks about in the book. I experienced many of the same things he did growing up in Rankin. So this was a walk down memory lane for me. This could've been my story. Except for the professional hockey player part.... This was a great book. I lived in Rankin Inlet, Churchill, Baker Lake, Yellowknife and Edmonton. All the places Jordin talks about in the book. I experienced many of the same things he did growing up in Rankin. So this was a walk down memory lane for me. This could've been my story. Except for the professional hockey player part....

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

    This book made me rethink my values in life and to stay true to myself. A great read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    I like how blunt and to the point he is.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joey Mueller

    Everyone in their lifetime has had to find ways around certain roadblocks keeping them from success. This autobiography about by Tootoo is an exact representation of how everyone has felt at least one time in their life. All the Way follows the life of Jordin Tootoo, a hockey player from Inuk descent, and overall shows all of the personal roadblocks he endured in and got around to reach his ultimate goal, to be a professional player. Ranging from when he was a young boy skating out on the ponds Everyone in their lifetime has had to find ways around certain roadblocks keeping them from success. This autobiography about by Tootoo is an exact representation of how everyone has felt at least one time in their life. All the Way follows the life of Jordin Tootoo, a hockey player from Inuk descent, and overall shows all of the personal roadblocks he endured in and got around to reach his ultimate goal, to be a professional player. Ranging from when he was a young boy skating out on the ponds all the way to when he was an adult playing the game, he had to overcome many issues that were real and relatable to. Me personally, I found this story to be very interesting and I was able to relate to similar occurrences in my athletic career to his and I thought that was very cool. All around, I really enjoyed reading this book and learning about a famous player of one of the sports i find very interesting and what I love to watch and learn about. Although all of the information and facts about him were very real and relevant, some of the story you could tell were kind of poorly written do to the fact this was written by him, a non author. Overall I believe his purpose for writing this was just to show that anyone can and is able to be great and succeed in their sport that they love. No matter the circumstances, everyone has a chance to be great in whatever they strive to be, and this story is a great motivational/uplifting way of telling everyone this exactly. Through parts of the story as well, many scenes were written so well that i seemed to almost be in that exact situation with Jordin due to this being a first person POV of his life and what he had to overcome. My favorite scene in the story was when he finally got drafted to play in the NHL and he was rejoicing with his family about the new success he now has gained. Overall I would recommend this story to just about anyone who enjoys reading and learning about normal people doing big things. Jordin had to overcome a lot just like millions of other americans and this story gives hope for all people. I believe that everyone should read this story to help them become better people and strive to become someone great.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Erin L

    Still processing my thoughts on this. It's a powerful book about Tootoo's roots, who he is as a person and a huge cultural divide in this country. And a bit about hockey of course. Still processing my thoughts on this. It's a powerful book about Tootoo's roots, who he is as a person and a huge cultural divide in this country. And a bit about hockey of course.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cody Lasko

    It's a quick read, even quicker if you're a hockey fan, and quicker yet if you have ever had even the slightest amount of interest in Jordin Tootoo and his story. But that doesn't mean this isn't a wonderful book to read. Not by a long shot. With remarkably precise and poignant brevity, Tootoo unapologetically recounts all the various notable moments of his life to weave a tale of desperate struggle, triumphant achievement, and unfathomable loss. The result is a tale Hemmingway would have been p It's a quick read, even quicker if you're a hockey fan, and quicker yet if you have ever had even the slightest amount of interest in Jordin Tootoo and his story. But that doesn't mean this isn't a wonderful book to read. Not by a long shot. With remarkably precise and poignant brevity, Tootoo unapologetically recounts all the various notable moments of his life to weave a tale of desperate struggle, triumphant achievement, and unfathomable loss. The result is a tale Hemmingway would have been proud of to see written, and even prouder to have known it was all the true experiences of one man. Recommended for just about anybody, hockey fan or not, because this book is a tribute to so much more than a mere game. This book is a tribute to an entire nation of people with emphasis on those conquering the far north. This book is a tribute to all those battling deeply ingrained issues of drug and alcohol abuse both personally and within their families. And most importantly this book is a tribute to Terence Tootoo. Jordin deserves all the credit in the world. I commend him for having gone all the way. Read the book and that line won't seem as horribly cheesy a pun as you first think it to be...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aj Woznesensky

    This book was an awesome read! I had no idea Tootoo had such a crazy upbringing, or what kind of obstacles he had to face to get to where he is today. I have always respected Jordin Tootoo as a player but after reading this book I respect him on a whole new level as a person. If you love sports biographies as I do, then this is a must read!!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I liked it because he talks about places and lifestyles that I am familiar with and don't get to read about often. If you don't understand hockey, you'll miss out on part of this. But if you understand the north, and addictions, you will become immersed in this. Jordin speaks easily and candidly about his upbringing and how he fought his demons. I liked it because he talks about places and lifestyles that I am familiar with and don't get to read about often. If you don't understand hockey, you'll miss out on part of this. But if you understand the north, and addictions, you will become immersed in this. Jordin speaks easily and candidly about his upbringing and how he fought his demons.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dngclark

    I have always been fascinated by the north and the Inuit culture. Jordin Tootoo lived this life and somehow overcame the overwhelming challenges of this unique world to become an NHL star. But he had to face his own demons. A great read for anyone who enjoys biographies and reading about people who have to overcome great odds to achieve success.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Torrie

    This was a great read. The story is both inspiring and heartbreaking. Jordin does an amazing job of giving a window into the Northern life which is very hard to understand as a "Southerner". A lot is said in what is written and also what is left unwritten. It is amazing that Jordon was able to break a cycle that haunts too many. A fast read for hockey and nonhockey fans. This was a great read. The story is both inspiring and heartbreaking. Jordin does an amazing job of giving a window into the Northern life which is very hard to understand as a "Southerner". A lot is said in what is written and also what is left unwritten. It is amazing that Jordon was able to break a cycle that haunts too many. A fast read for hockey and nonhockey fans.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    No sugar coating on this biography. Written in an honest voice about family dysfunction and choosing to break the cycle while still remaining true to his native roots. Topics that most of us would prefer to sweep under the rug if they were happening in our own lives: emotional and physical abuse, alcohol abuse, addiction, suicide.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gillian

    Heart-breaking and life affirming, and the perfect book for me to read at the end of a very tough year. I've always been a Tootoo fan, now I'm even more so. I hope that he finds new life and lots of ice time in New Jersey. Heart-breaking and life affirming, and the perfect book for me to read at the end of a very tough year. I've always been a Tootoo fan, now I'm even more so. I hope that he finds new life and lots of ice time in New Jersey.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Young

    I finished this in two days. A very honest look at jordins life. Growing up near Brandon I recall the suicide of his brother. Very tragic jordin goes over his journey of how he got to the nhl growing up in the far north and living with the choice his brother made well worth the read

  23. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    Go out and get this book! Now! Jordin Tootoo doesn't hold back. He tells his story with brutal honesty. I loved hearing about the journey he took to get to Brandon and the Wheat Kings. He holds no punches and you need to share the journey! Go out and get this book! Now! Jordin Tootoo doesn't hold back. He tells his story with brutal honesty. I loved hearing about the journey he took to get to Brandon and the Wheat Kings. He holds no punches and you need to share the journey!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Herondale

    this only gets a two because if not for tje semi redeing last chapters it was what i felt brash douchey and attempts to love up to theo fluery's book. wouldnt recommend the book but i think jordin has become an admirable person! this only gets a two because if not for tje semi redeing last chapters it was what i felt brash douchey and attempts to love up to theo fluery's book. wouldnt recommend the book but i think jordin has become an admirable person!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ck

    A great story about a First Nations man and his life growing up on a remote community in Canada. And then his life growing up fast in hockey.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Helena

    Simple and honest.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nick Popull

    Honest!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Branston

    I am not a hockey fan, but I am now a Tootoo fan. I'm cheering for you Jordin! I am not a hockey fan, but I am now a Tootoo fan. I'm cheering for you Jordin!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dianne Landry

    A great story of overcoming adversity just not very well written.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Michael DeRuchie Mrs. Vermeeren Gram And Comp 11 April 2017 “All The Way” “All the challenges and pressure would have been more than enough for any rookie,but TooToo found something far more difficult, the tragic loss of his older brother before his first shift for the Nashville Predators”. This quote is the turning point of this book it leads him to many challenges on his journey. Jordin TooToo is an ice hockey player currently playing for the Chicago Blackhawks. He has played for two other teams p Michael DeRuchie Mrs. Vermeeren Gram And Comp 11 April 2017 “All The Way” “All the challenges and pressure would have been more than enough for any rookie,but TooToo found something far more difficult, the tragic loss of his older brother before his first shift for the Nashville Predators”. This quote is the turning point of this book it leads him to many challenges on his journey. Jordin TooToo is an ice hockey player currently playing for the Chicago Blackhawks. He has played for two other teams previously. TooToo grew up in a small city called Rankin in Canada. Jordin and his family faced a tragic loss. He has faced many challenges and it’s interesting to see how and what he does to overcome them. “All the way” is an autobiography about a hockey named Jordin TooToo. We all face challenges everyday but the way jordin overcomes them is something else. The biggest challenge he faces is a tragic loss in his family and it affects him everyday. In 2001 TooToo was drafted by the Nashville Predators but theres one thing, he wasn't the best but he did something no other did and that was be a leader. He is a hero for many and mainly his home town. People that would like this book vary in a way. This book could not just be for hockey players. It could be for people that need motivation to get through there challanges. Kids in 5th grade through the rest of your life could read this book because people till this day face challenges. “All the way” helped me get through my biggest challenge of being small because Jordin was too. This book has great point of view because its not just Jordin telling the story but he gets help from a man named Stephen Brunt. These two work together and put together an amzing story and i really inspire you to check it out because it really can make a difference like it did for me.

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