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The Hunt for Zero Point: Inside the Classified World of Antigravity Technology

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The atomic bomb was not the only project to occupy government scientists during the 1940s. Antigravity technology, originally spearheaded by scientists in Nazi Germany, was another high priority, one that still may be in effect today. Now, for the first time, an acclaimed journalist with unprecedented access to key sources in the intelligence and military communities revea The atomic bomb was not the only project to occupy government scientists during the 1940s. Antigravity technology, originally spearheaded by scientists in Nazi Germany, was another high priority, one that still may be in effect today. Now, for the first time, an acclaimed journalist with unprecedented access to key sources in the intelligence and military communities reveals suppressed evidence that tells the story of a quest for a discovery that could prove as powerful as the atomic bomb. The Hunt for Zero Point explores the scientific speculation that “zero point” energy—a limitless source of potential power that may hold the key to defying and thereby controlling gravity—exists in the universe and can be replicated. The pressure to be the first nation to harness gravity is immense, as it means having the ability to build military planes of unlimited speed and range, along with the most deadly weaponry the world has ever seen. The ideal shape for a gravity-defying vehicle happens to be a perfect disk, making antigravity tests a possible explanation for numerous UFO sightings during the past fifty years. Drawn from interviews with those involved int the research and visits to labs in Europe and the United States, The Hunt for Zero Point is a captivating account of the twentieth century’s most puzzling unexplained phenomenon.


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The atomic bomb was not the only project to occupy government scientists during the 1940s. Antigravity technology, originally spearheaded by scientists in Nazi Germany, was another high priority, one that still may be in effect today. Now, for the first time, an acclaimed journalist with unprecedented access to key sources in the intelligence and military communities revea The atomic bomb was not the only project to occupy government scientists during the 1940s. Antigravity technology, originally spearheaded by scientists in Nazi Germany, was another high priority, one that still may be in effect today. Now, for the first time, an acclaimed journalist with unprecedented access to key sources in the intelligence and military communities reveals suppressed evidence that tells the story of a quest for a discovery that could prove as powerful as the atomic bomb. The Hunt for Zero Point explores the scientific speculation that “zero point” energy—a limitless source of potential power that may hold the key to defying and thereby controlling gravity—exists in the universe and can be replicated. The pressure to be the first nation to harness gravity is immense, as it means having the ability to build military planes of unlimited speed and range, along with the most deadly weaponry the world has ever seen. The ideal shape for a gravity-defying vehicle happens to be a perfect disk, making antigravity tests a possible explanation for numerous UFO sightings during the past fifty years. Drawn from interviews with those involved int the research and visits to labs in Europe and the United States, The Hunt for Zero Point is a captivating account of the twentieth century’s most puzzling unexplained phenomenon.

30 review for The Hunt for Zero Point: Inside the Classified World of Antigravity Technology

  1. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Stroh

    Good read? Try great read. This is another page turner. Nick Cook's indefatigable search for buried science after WWII would read like a spy thriller, if you didn't know he used to be a top editor at Jane's Defense Weekly. He is highly credible, and I can vouch for that professionally, which some reviewers have questioned. No wonder, given the subject matter. Bottom line: This is a guy who doesn't make stuff up. Anyway, you couldn't make this stuff up if you tried. Looking for the modern legacy Good read? Try great read. This is another page turner. Nick Cook's indefatigable search for buried science after WWII would read like a spy thriller, if you didn't know he used to be a top editor at Jane's Defense Weekly. He is highly credible, and I can vouch for that professionally, which some reviewers have questioned. No wonder, given the subject matter. Bottom line: This is a guy who doesn't make stuff up. Anyway, you couldn't make this stuff up if you tried. Looking for the modern legacy of the antigravity research and technology development program believed to have flourished in Hitler's Germany, and even to have brought products--flying objects--to light, Cook picks up the scent and starts tracking leads. The documents, of course, have been classified TOP SECRET since the 1940s. Hot on the trails of witness after witness, Cook finds them dead. Suspiciously so. In one notorious case towards the end of the war, involving colleagues of Wernher von Braun and my wife's grandfather, Dr. Eduard Gerber, Nazi officials ordered a group of a few dozen German rocket scientists onto a bus heading for a "conference." They pulled the bus over on a deserted stretch of road and shot them all. Chilling. Hitler wasn't the only one with something to hide. Cook has trouble explaining what happened to various potential eyewitnesses after the war, here in the United States. Investigating the physics that was likely to have been product tested, and then mysteriously disappeared off the face of the earth into various "black ops" boxes, he begins to understand what was at stake for the Allies, for the aviation industry, and ultimately for the planet. And what he learns is terrifying. Remember, this is nonfiction. In the vein of All the President's Men, you worry about Nick Cook just as much as you yearn for the truth to come to light. I wasn't able to put this book down. It was that exciting. The research is so well documented, the facts are so solid, Amy Gerber and I referred to it constantly during the making of our Cold War documentary, MY GRANDFATHER WAS A NAZI SCIENTIST: Opa, von Braun and Operation Paperclip. I've had The Hunt for Zero Point on my top shelf ever since.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    I am unsure how I ended up with this book on my Kindle. I don't remember where I found it or why I thought to read it. The author (Nick Cook) was at one point the aviation editor for Jane's Defense Weekly, a famous defense industry magazine that is read worldwide. The author’s journalism chops stand to recommend this book. The subject matter is another thing, and needs to be dealt with very carefully: it describes the investigative exploits of Nick Cook as he travels the world, trying to discern I am unsure how I ended up with this book on my Kindle. I don't remember where I found it or why I thought to read it. The author (Nick Cook) was at one point the aviation editor for Jane's Defense Weekly, a famous defense industry magazine that is read worldwide. The author’s journalism chops stand to recommend this book. The subject matter is another thing, and needs to be dealt with very carefully: it describes the investigative exploits of Nick Cook as he travels the world, trying to discern if there is any truth to rumors about anti-gravity research taking place in the highly secretive clandestine engineering departments of defense industry contractors. In other words, Cook is probing the fuzzy line between crackpottery and classified innovation. It’s no secret that firms such as Boeing or NASA fund small, internal departments dedicated to testing highly speculative, long-shot proposals for “breakthrough propulsion”. The fact that the Gravity Research Foundation was created in the 1950s, for example, is not controversial. What’s controversial is any suggestion that such research bore fruit. In the current, accepted, rigorously-tested corpus of physical theory, producing any sort of gravitational effect testable in a lab is considered prohibitively difficult due to the sheer size of the energies required. Einstein has shown that gravity is sourced by mass-energy, with a coupling constant of G / c^4, and therefore very large amounts of mass-energy are always necessary to obtain gravitational effects of some importance. Any claim to provide anti-gravity effects in a lab setting, therefore, implies new physics beyond the boundaries of conventional physics. Which isn’t immediately damning, but it makes the entire subject a massive crank magnet. Physics cranks exist in large numbers, possibly even outnumbering conventional researchers. They produce prodigious amounts of pseudo-theory, perpetual motion machine schematics, free energy devices, revolutionary physical theories, even their own vanity pseudo-scientific journals, etc., while evangelizing with the force and urgency of a religious fanatic. Because they couch their arguments in terms that sound sciencey (hence the term pseudo-science), and occasionally employ deliberate trickery, they can be very convincing to an untrained observer. This all means that the simultaneous collision of pseudoscience, speculative physics, and big-money top-secret defense industry research makes for a heady and misleading subject matter that needs to be handled with the utmost care and an expert’s discerning eye. Nick Cook plainly admits that he has only a rudimentary grasp of physics, making him extremely unqualified to navigate these waters which are so fraught with deliberate deception and outright fraudulent claims. He even gets some very basic physics things wrong throughout the book, such as confusing the cosmic microwave background radiation with quantum zero-point energy. He is well-meaning, but naive. Sending Nick Cook to investigate this stuff is like sending the adolescent president of the Harry Potter Fan Club to investigate Uri Geller. The kid wants badly to believe magic is real, but Uri Geller is playing a con man’s game, and the kid is not an expert on how stage magic is effected, resulting in an earnest but meaningless mess of a result. Nick Cook spends the first third of the book stressing how much the anti-gravity subject is a career killer for journalists and scientists, I suspect as a way to soften the reader’s reaction to all this. It starts out well enough, with a bit of digging into the research of the 1950s, NASA, and Lockheed-Martin. My eyes began to roll, however, as we delved into the “secret Nazi flying saucer projects” mythos, which, sure enough, led directly to the secret Nazi “bell” experiment. After this, I thought for a moment that Nick Cook would pull up, let sanity prevail, and realize he had been lead astray, before he dove headfirst into Boyd Bushman (the former Lockheed engineer who is on youtube claiming a picture of an alien doll is an actual extraterrestrial), Tesla urban legends, and, of all things, the Hutchison effect. The Hutchison effect! It is hard to explain to someone unfamiliar with all this stuff (somebody, no doubt, with saner interests than yours truly) how the so-called “Hutchison effect” is the crown jewel of physics crackpottery. Promising everything from free energy to death rays, a Canadian man who has crammed his apartment full of impressive-looking cold war radio equipment has created for the unwitting press “demonstrations” of his magical electromagnetic effect, whereby he creates fishing-wire “levitations”, reversed-film-footage spooky effects, and even antigravity by flipping his camera upside-down. His explanation is just hand-waving about high frequencies and high voltages. It is the lowest, bottom-of-the-barrel, carnival-barker snake oil, beyond all standards of reason and good sense, and Hutchison has been exposed for the fraud he is on multiple occasions. It only works because of the average person’s credulity and trust, and to whom electromagnetism might as well be a spooky magical thing with unknown and unknowable potential. Poor Nick Cook. This is where his earnest naivete led him: he wanted to write a book about NASA and antigravity, and ended up finishing his book on the theoretical physics equivalent of the jackalope. Overall, the book is well written, in that Cook employs lots of methods to make a dry, journalistic investigation into a historical subject somewhat gripping. The bit in the middle about Nazis drags a bit. The guy is good, but the editor really needed an expert to keep him from walking straight off into the deep end. At the very least, don’t allow someone to publish claims that a fancy electric fan made by an Austrian forester in the 1930s could spin air molecules “into such a state of super-excitement” that they coupled to a “zero-point field”. It’s embarrassing to everyone involved: the publisher, the reader, and the author.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tobias

    Amazing read. i was expecting a little kookiness, but this book had none of that. There is most definatily a hidden technology breakthrough, and failure to disclose it is keeping the whole of humanity from a paradigm shift. The fall of gravity, like the fall of reilgion, has the potential to set mankind free of its social-political chains. Also discussed heavily in this book is the German military-industrial complex, and how the SS started controlling arms & tech development, the way they structu Amazing read. i was expecting a little kookiness, but this book had none of that. There is most definatily a hidden technology breakthrough, and failure to disclose it is keeping the whole of humanity from a paradigm shift. The fall of gravity, like the fall of reilgion, has the potential to set mankind free of its social-political chains. Also discussed heavily in this book is the German military-industrial complex, and how the SS started controlling arms & tech development, the way they structured their top secret security and how America and it aerospace industry adopted the same techniques to keep black projects under wraps. I had known how much we had walked away with from Germany tech wise, like V-2's and such, but I was stunned to learn the details of such an operation as it was enacted. The book could use some flow charts and other visual data organization showing overlaps in developments and a general timeliine, better maps also. This can only serve to help more see the undeniable connections made in pursuit of this technology. The upcoming film Iron Sky picks up where Kammler left off in Germany, or more appropriately, vanished, turning the storyline into more of a comic book adventure. Should be a good film, but should not be allowed to distract the populace from the real truth behind the tale. Kammler, so freaking mysterious, enigmatic, might be one of the most important figures of last century, with only a few knowing his name. More books like this one are needed to show the world what is really going on. It is so often rumored that the Nazi and SS were into occult projects. Its easy to see how labs in hidden mountain caves emitting strange glows, with levitating objects & mysterious effects, could easily have been distorted

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Plassen Lopes

    Excellent serious research on the notion that there are physics that might go beyond Relative Theory and 4-dimension time-space reality. To know that work has been done since the 30s secretly in this area and its capability to either bring free energy, faster-than-light travel or the entire destruction of a world is both thrilling and terrifying.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This book is very interesting if you are mystery and science minded- and chilling. The author is very careful about his research and has some very cool stories to tell. Even cooler- I emailed the author a question and he answered!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Les

    If there is a book to give a newcomer to the subjects of antigravity technology and secret science, then this would have to be the one. It's a very well written account of one man's search for information and the truth about these fascinating ideas. The author is a reputable aviation journalist in his own right which means the book is well researched and presented. His search takes him from the present day back to those secretive events surrounding the snatching of German scientists and technolo If there is a book to give a newcomer to the subjects of antigravity technology and secret science, then this would have to be the one. It's a very well written account of one man's search for information and the truth about these fascinating ideas. The author is a reputable aviation journalist in his own right which means the book is well researched and presented. His search takes him from the present day back to those secretive events surrounding the snatching of German scientists and technologies immediately after the German surrender in World War Two, and tries to connect the dots within the post-war US and Soviet military industrial complexes, to unravel the secrets of antigravity machine development and other associated technologies. I found the stories from the world of Nazi science totally engrossing, with so many intriguing ideas and personalities all driven by various motivations. I get the impression that we may be just beginning to discover the wonders from this dark time in Germany's history, and if one can look past the fanaticism of the Nazi regime and in particular Himmler's occult-driven SS (who ended up controlling most of the technology) you can see so much evidence of scientific and technical brilliance. A top-notch book, and the best overview of this amazing topic that I've read so far. I highly recommend it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Phil Penhallow

    This book was quite a surprise as it is written in the style of a story. I would classify it as a sort of military detective story that is both thoroughly engrossing and entertaining. I would thoroughly recommend it for any fans of conspiracy theory, in particular those who are interested in anti-gravity drives. The suggestion is that the technology is available now but suppressed or in use only in deep black projects. I particularly liked the fact that according to Bill Gunston OBE the stealth This book was quite a surprise as it is written in the style of a story. I would classify it as a sort of military detective story that is both thoroughly engrossing and entertaining. I would thoroughly recommend it for any fans of conspiracy theory, in particular those who are interested in anti-gravity drives. The suggestion is that the technology is available now but suppressed or in use only in deep black projects. I particularly liked the fact that according to Bill Gunston OBE the stealth bomber does not have enough thrust or lift from its engine spec to lift its 376,500 pound weight of the ground. It uses anti gravity technology to reduce its weight, intriguing indeed, especially coming from someone so respected in the industry, as here is the technology apparently in plain sight. Great book well worth the read, one of those rare breeds I will read again as it has so much to take in.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Thijs Moonen

    follow-up reads: - biography Schauberger

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave Graham

    Very interesting book regarding some of the research into null-gravity devices (e.g. Antigravity technology). This book was recommended by author James Rollins.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    While working for various technology and defense journals, Nick Cook stumbled over clues to a secret world of scientific research deep within the military industrial complex. In scenes that remind one of Bob Woodward's meetings with Deep Throat, Cook describes his multi-year quest to get to the bottom of one of the great phantom stories of modern physics and military technology: antigravity. He traces the history of the research from its early days in the Third Reich to modern inquiries into ant While working for various technology and defense journals, Nick Cook stumbled over clues to a secret world of scientific research deep within the military industrial complex. In scenes that remind one of Bob Woodward's meetings with Deep Throat, Cook describes his multi-year quest to get to the bottom of one of the great phantom stories of modern physics and military technology: antigravity. He traces the history of the research from its early days in the Third Reich to modern inquiries into anti-gravity technology and zero point energy. The cast of characters range from the reputable to the insane, and although Cook never stumbles on a clear answer, many interesting questions are raised, including the possibility of infinite, cheap energy. Whether it's true or not is irrelevant by the time you get to the end; by then, all that's important is how much fun nonfiction really can be. Whether or not this book is 100% believable is beside the point. Nick Cook, a respected military industrial writer from Jane's Defense Weekly, acknowledges himself that he doesn't know how much of what he discovered he should have faith in, and he questions the stability of some of his own sources. But the pace, action and style of the book make it a fascinating, hard-to-put-down read worthy of the spirit of All the President's Men. It's worth noting that the story starts with Nazis and Project Paperclip, the US plan to sneak Nazi war criminals into the US because they clearly knew a lot about science we didn't know. That right there is the scariest part of the book, and its certainty as fact has been well documented. It's a solid, if ominous, starting point for a strange and imaginative investigative report. NC

  11. 5 out of 5

    Timon

    A real-life X Files story. Nick Cook, a respected journalist and editor for Jane's Defense Weekly delves into the physics and science experiments dating back to WWII relating to antigravity. Looking for the modern legacy of the antigravity research and technology development program believed to have flourished in Hitler's Germany, and which brought prototypes of flying objects to light, Cook picks up the scent and starts tracking leads. Hot on the trails of witness after witness, Cook finds many A real-life X Files story. Nick Cook, a respected journalist and editor for Jane's Defense Weekly delves into the physics and science experiments dating back to WWII relating to antigravity. Looking for the modern legacy of the antigravity research and technology development program believed to have flourished in Hitler's Germany, and which brought prototypes of flying objects to light, Cook picks up the scent and starts tracking leads. Hot on the trails of witness after witness, Cook finds many of them dead. Suspiciously so. In one notorious case towards the end of the war, Nazi officials ordered a group of a few dozen German rocket scientists onto a bus heading for a "conference." They pulled the bus over on a deserted stretch of road and shot them all. Chilling. Hitler wasn't the only one with something to hide. Cook has trouble explaining what happened to various potential eyewitnesses after the war, in the United States. Investigating the physics that was likely to have been product tested, and then mysteriously disappeared off the face of the earth into various "black ops" boxes, he begins to understand what was at stake for the Allies, for the aviation industry, and ultimately for the planet. And what he learns is terrifying. Cook manages to connect the technology dots and links the technologies he is researching to modern day stealth fighters and to the UFO sightings that were tied to their early flight tests. A work of non-fiction that reads like a Tom Clancy story!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    This is a very strange book on a very strange subject. I am absolutely not sure what to make of it. Zero Gravity? Nazis in UFOs? Roswell? Missing Nazi Generals? Its all here. I personally tend to avoid topics that send you down a hall of mirrors. That includes the Kennedy Assassination. It doesn't matter how important it is, or how strong your sense of outrage may be, you go in and you will never find any resolution. Zero point and Kammler is one of those subjects. Go ahead and go in if you want This is a very strange book on a very strange subject. I am absolutely not sure what to make of it. Zero Gravity? Nazis in UFOs? Roswell? Missing Nazi Generals? Its all here. I personally tend to avoid topics that send you down a hall of mirrors. That includes the Kennedy Assassination. It doesn't matter how important it is, or how strong your sense of outrage may be, you go in and you will never find any resolution. Zero point and Kammler is one of those subjects. Go ahead and go in if you want. Better people than you have. They try and they lose it. This book is very interesting, though I would hesitate to call it informative, because this is one of those rabbit hole subjects. Neither you or know the facts in this and I'm not sure the author does either. He might really have something or he might be utterly full of it. I have repeatedly tried to find out about Hans Kammler and there seems to be almost nothing written about him prior to perhaps 1980. but there seems to be a whole alternative history has grown up around him. I have know idea where the truth lies. But there is an important, highly obscure American Intelligence figure in this story who seems to pop up in almost every piece of post war Spook skullduggery, including the Manhattan Project, ALSOS, Roswell, MK Ultra, and even the JFK Assassination, though I'm not sure I've ever met a conspiracy theorist who's ever heard of him.

  13. 5 out of 5

    D

    An outstanding investigative book by a very credible author. This is no cockamamie run-of-the-mill writer framing hokum books. At some points its just his educated guess work based on what he unravels. But at many points the hardcore facts of his research are too strong to be ignored. Cook presents his case extremely well from a historically scientific, technical and albeit industrial perspective. His quest: The truth behind the past and present of purported stealth, anti gravity propulsion syste An outstanding investigative book by a very credible author. This is no cockamamie run-of-the-mill writer framing hokum books. At some points its just his educated guess work based on what he unravels. But at many points the hardcore facts of his research are too strong to be ignored. Cook presents his case extremely well from a historically scientific, technical and albeit industrial perspective. His quest: The truth behind the past and present of purported stealth, anti gravity propulsion systems and top secret military projects dating back to second world war. What became of Project Winterhaven? Could UFO sightings be Top secret military aircrafts/experiments? Does the Northrop B2 bomber have more to it than stealth? what could project Aurora and T-32 Black Manta actually be involved in? what do the involved organizations say about it? Sure you'll always have your critics? Doesn't make a damned difference. Definitely one of the best, assertive and authentic works into a clandestine, controversial and highly secretive field of work. I am a fast reader but this book was too strong to go shotgun- each line needs rereading, heavy thinking and high savoring. Its a very serious read. That's the 2nd best thing about this book. Helps if you are well versed with this field and World war 2 to start with.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gouty

    A fascinating book. The author seems to have the credentials (he works for Jane’s Defense Publications), but he is saying some pretty far out things. The problem is that parts of it are documented fact, and some, while he does say that they are possibilities, are unbelievable. For example: he states that in the race to get as much Nazi technology and keep it from the Russians the US government did not prosecute some very very nasty war criminals, and even allowed them into the US. I accept this A fascinating book. The author seems to have the credentials (he works for Jane’s Defense Publications), but he is saying some pretty far out things. The problem is that parts of it are documented fact, and some, while he does say that they are possibilities, are unbelievable. For example: he states that in the race to get as much Nazi technology and keep it from the Russians the US government did not prosecute some very very nasty war criminals, and even allowed them into the US. I accept this as well documented fact from multiple sources. On the other hand he says that one of the technologies that the US might have gotten was anti-gravity technology. While of course the government would try and keep this secret, and with all conspiracy theories I use Franklin’s general rule “Three can keep a secret, if two are dead”. I don’t believe that secrets of the magnitude can be kept secret for over fifty years. It is defiantly a thought provoking book. I would like other people’s opinion on it and if there are any quantum physicists out there on good reads or anybody who knows any I would like their opinion on some of the stuff in the book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aengus

    If you look at the lurid science fiction cover, and flip through the contents (Nazis! Suppressed free energy technology! UFOs! Did I mention NAZIS?!!), you might think "The Hunt for Zero Point" would be of limited interest to anyone outside the tin foil hat wearing conspiracy crowd. And you'd be wrong. Nick Cook is no conspiracy monger. He was aviation editor at Janes Defence Weekly; in other words, a serious journalist. When Cook first gets wind of the possible existence of zero point technolo If you look at the lurid science fiction cover, and flip through the contents (Nazis! Suppressed free energy technology! UFOs! Did I mention NAZIS?!!), you might think "The Hunt for Zero Point" would be of limited interest to anyone outside the tin foil hat wearing conspiracy crowd. And you'd be wrong. Nick Cook is no conspiracy monger. He was aviation editor at Janes Defence Weekly; in other words, a serious journalist. When Cook first gets wind of the possible existence of zero point technology (which could theoretically lead to FTL anti-gravity propulsion systems), he writes it off as a blind from those who operate black budget technology development, i.e. a story to discredit researchers as cranks. But when he pulls the threads, retired engineers become unwilling to talk, and all sorts of fringe ideas (secret Nazi flying saucers, remote viewing, time travel) become not only plausible, but probable. At times, "The Hunt for Zero Point" reads like "All the President's Men". It's a first person account of an accomplished journalist chasing down the leads of a highly disturbing story. Highly recommended for anyone with an open mind.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I really enjoyed reading this book. It is written by an "insider" of the world military complex. He lets us follow his trail as he unravels some mysterious high technologies. One of the strengths of the book is that he maintains a healthy skepticism throughout. In spite of this fact he does uncover some things that would make a huge impact on our modern world in spite of the fact that much of it was being developed by the Nazis over 60 years ago. There is ample evidence that anything truly revol I really enjoyed reading this book. It is written by an "insider" of the world military complex. He lets us follow his trail as he unravels some mysterious high technologies. One of the strengths of the book is that he maintains a healthy skepticism throughout. In spite of this fact he does uncover some things that would make a huge impact on our modern world in spite of the fact that much of it was being developed by the Nazis over 60 years ago. There is ample evidence that anything truly revolutionary has been either stifled or taken under deep cover. I would recommend this book to a wide range of people as a mystery book, WWII history, military technology and minimally as a conspiracy book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nynke Fokma

    After the second world war the secret services from the various partners in the allied forces supposedly had a ball trying to confiscate as much German technology as possible before their "partners" would. Like a "technology/arms race". For who wants to know more, the The Hunt for Zero Point is a great start. Mind you, it's all highly controversial. Don't read in metanoia (gullible) state. After the second world war the secret services from the various partners in the allied forces supposedly had a ball trying to confiscate as much German technology as possible before their "partners" would. Like a "technology/arms race". For who wants to know more, the The Hunt for Zero Point is a great start. Mind you, it's all highly controversial. Don't read in metanoia (gullible) state.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pat Rolston

    Nick Cook reminds me of Joseph P. Farrell and his attention to detail while creating a pleasurable reading experience. The author is credible and if you enjoy the search for exotic knowledge this is a book for you. There is very fascinating history with supporting information opening up the window into Operation Paperclip and the implications for alternate technologies. Enjoyable for anyone looking to better understand potentially life and world changing technologies that need to be publicized f Nick Cook reminds me of Joseph P. Farrell and his attention to detail while creating a pleasurable reading experience. The author is credible and if you enjoy the search for exotic knowledge this is a book for you. There is very fascinating history with supporting information opening up the window into Operation Paperclip and the implications for alternate technologies. Enjoyable for anyone looking to better understand potentially life and world changing technologies that need to be publicized for understanding and hopefully realization.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nisha Sadasivan

    This book was recommended to me by James Rollins in Sigma Force #3 - Black Order. The rating of the book was also very good, and I picked it up almost immediately. It was very interesting, dispelling some of the superstitions regarding UFO sightings. However, beyond a point, the content became very mundane, with almost same content getting repeated again and again. I felt it was a Ph. D thesis of Nick Cook, which a Nazi researcher would enjoy, not me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Manheim Wagner

    A great page turner that reads like a great suspense book, The Hunt for Zero Point is a highly credible and cursory investigation into the existence of anti-gravity. Nick Cook's writing is superb and easy to follow. This book is a must for anyone who has every questioned the notion of gravity, the secret sciences of the Third Reich and the world of American black projects. A great page turner that reads like a great suspense book, The Hunt for Zero Point is a highly credible and cursory investigation into the existence of anti-gravity. Nick Cook's writing is superb and easy to follow. This book is a must for anyone who has every questioned the notion of gravity, the secret sciences of the Third Reich and the world of American black projects.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Oscar Sanchez

    An enjoyable read. To me this was all the more reason to be skeptical of UFOs (via aliens) since anti-gravity technology has been researched, studied, experimented with and used for such a long time.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rae Gee

    Brilliant book! If you've got any interest in anti-gravity or zero point energy, then give this book a read. It's written in an engaging way and will catch the attention of even the non-engineers (like me). It does get heavy going but it's well worth it. Great book! Brilliant book! If you've got any interest in anti-gravity or zero point energy, then give this book a read. It's written in an engaging way and will catch the attention of even the non-engineers (like me). It does get heavy going but it's well worth it. Great book!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dan Pfeiffer

    To my way of thinking, this is a book by a serious, mainstream journalist who tackles a subject unfortunately tarnished by questionable esoterica; that every human being should read given the life changing implications that zero point energy represents. But what do I know?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Wright

    Great read!! Had no idea what this book would be about. Just got recommend to me. Turned out to be a fantastic and very interesting read. Loved the historical perspectives in the aerospace industry as well as the military history mixed in. Highly recommend it!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Benedict Reid

    I'm still not convinced. Not even slightly. I'm still not convinced. Not even slightly.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marek Herman

    Great adventure, very surprising and thrilling - the only thing I would omit was the part in Poland which is not verified. Other than that, perfect!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Grey Wolf

    Written in a lovely literary style, and very much in the format of a quest, this book exposes half hidden facts and tries to get to the bottom of them.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tie Webb

    Good, thought provoking book. Shines some light on how secret studies and programs are hidden from the public.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Neighborhood Nationalist

    One of the most fascinating books I’ve read in years.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Strange book — in one sense, the 2013 reporting based on Snowden's leak of the U.S. "black budget" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_b...) makes some of the R&D-in-secret claims sound very plausible, yet Cook always seems to come up short on specific explanations for most of the experiments he claims to summarize. (Instead of repeatedly, narratively describing secretly calling up his PhD physics friend "Marckus" for feedback, for dramatic effect, the book could have benefited from actually si Strange book — in one sense, the 2013 reporting based on Snowden's leak of the U.S. "black budget" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_b...) makes some of the R&D-in-secret claims sound very plausible, yet Cook always seems to come up short on specific explanations for most of the experiments he claims to summarize. (Instead of repeatedly, narratively describing secretly calling up his PhD physics friend "Marckus" for feedback, for dramatic effect, the book could have benefited from actually sitting down with a physicist as a co-writer.) If anything, though, Cook lends credence to the view (as expressed in the documentary Mirage Men, for example) that the growth of the "UFO"/aliens craze since the 1940s is most likely purposeful misdirection from sightings of military high-tech. experiments, based on tech. or physics kept secret from the public. Some of the journal articles about electromagnetic effects which Cook sites from the 1950s are readily verifiable, so it wouldn't be that surprising if publicly unknown effects of plasmas or other high-energy states are being weaponized in secret for flight or other uses (after all, it's not like a hobbyist could just test airflow-charge-boosting properties upon faster-than-sound flight in their garage). So . . . 3 stars just for occasional details that wouldn't be known otherwise, and for some of the travel narratives, at least.

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