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The World's Most Haunted House: The True Story of the Bridgeport Poltergeist on Lindley Street

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In this unprecedented work, the story of the 1974 Bridgeport, Connecticut poltergeist is at last revealed. A crowd of more than 2,000 onlookers gathered. National media reported jumping furniture, floating refrigerators, and attacking entities. Decades after the publicity quieted, more than 40 hours of never-before released interviews with police officers, firefighters, and In this unprecedented work, the story of the 1974 Bridgeport, Connecticut poltergeist is at last revealed. A crowd of more than 2,000 onlookers gathered. National media reported jumping furniture, floating refrigerators, and attacking entities. Decades after the publicity quieted, more than 40 hours of never-before released interviews with police officers, firefighters, and others tell the story as it actually unfolded: * Relive the experience, the terror, the rampant emotions, and the unexplainable events that took place in that house as they happened. * Have access to revealing excerpts from actual interviews, police reports,and rare documents. * Access unreleased audio, poltergeist sounds, and an old radio broadcast. Return to 1974 and feel the Lindley Street experience from the inside. Find out why it is deemed the haunting that should have brought the paranormal into mainstream science.


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In this unprecedented work, the story of the 1974 Bridgeport, Connecticut poltergeist is at last revealed. A crowd of more than 2,000 onlookers gathered. National media reported jumping furniture, floating refrigerators, and attacking entities. Decades after the publicity quieted, more than 40 hours of never-before released interviews with police officers, firefighters, and In this unprecedented work, the story of the 1974 Bridgeport, Connecticut poltergeist is at last revealed. A crowd of more than 2,000 onlookers gathered. National media reported jumping furniture, floating refrigerators, and attacking entities. Decades after the publicity quieted, more than 40 hours of never-before released interviews with police officers, firefighters, and others tell the story as it actually unfolded: * Relive the experience, the terror, the rampant emotions, and the unexplainable events that took place in that house as they happened. * Have access to revealing excerpts from actual interviews, police reports,and rare documents. * Access unreleased audio, poltergeist sounds, and an old radio broadcast. Return to 1974 and feel the Lindley Street experience from the inside. Find out why it is deemed the haunting that should have brought the paranormal into mainstream science.

30 review for The World's Most Haunted House: The True Story of the Bridgeport Poltergeist on Lindley Street

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Masterson

    "The World's Most Haunted House" by William J. Hall is a book about a World famous haunting that occurred in Bridgeport, CT, in 1974. The author presents the facts that were covered up and he lets the reader come to a conclusion as to whether this was a true haunting made to look like a hoax to deter the media or whether it truly was a hoax. So why did I read this book? I live a couple miles away from this house and have heard so much about this case. I am also paranormal curious and it is Spookt "The World's Most Haunted House" by William J. Hall is a book about a World famous haunting that occurred in Bridgeport, CT, in 1974. The author presents the facts that were covered up and he lets the reader come to a conclusion as to whether this was a true haunting made to look like a hoax to deter the media or whether it truly was a hoax. So why did I read this book? I live a couple miles away from this house and have heard so much about this case. I am also paranormal curious and it is Spooktober! Lol The book itself is filled with the entire story, eyewitness interviews, CT's Royal Paranormal family (Ed and Lorraine Warren) and much more! The problem I had with this book is that it is so redundant that by the end I was skimming it and couldn't wait to finish it. It also just did not flow well. Personally I think this was a true haunting and the media spectacle caused it to be deemed a hoax. I have heard so much about this case from people in my area, including a retired police officer who was there when this all went down. If you are from Connecticut and or into the paranormal I recommend it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    William Hall

    I never planned on rating my book, however, it was rated one star prior to its release. The book is simply not available and therefore cannot be read. (Release is August 2014). Goodreads allows this, unlike Amazon or Barnes and Noble, therefore I rated my book to counteract a rating based on no available information. Bill

  3. 5 out of 5

    El

    Before reading: Sure, why not? Maybe it'll be better than The Demon of Brownsville Road: A Pittsburgh Family's Battle with Evil in Their Home. After reading: First off, it was better than The Demon of Brownsville Road, but really only because I was so turned off by the preachiness of that one, and this book has none of it. A little preachy can go a long way, so thanks to the author here for leaving religion out of it for the most part. Yes, the church is involved and there's a former seminarian or Before reading: Sure, why not? Maybe it'll be better than The Demon of Brownsville Road: A Pittsburgh Family's Battle with Evil in Their Home. After reading: First off, it was better than The Demon of Brownsville Road, but really only because I was so turned off by the preachiness of that one, and this book has none of it. A little preachy can go a long way, so thanks to the author here for leaving religion out of it for the most part. Yes, the church is involved and there's a former seminarian or whatever, but no one is wandering around saying "But God!" and pooh-poohing anything else. In fact, many of the people involved questioned the family and offered up the suggestion that there was something more psychological going on than paranormal. I appreciated that greatly because these true accounts tend to forget things like - oh, I don't know - that someone (or some people) in the family "targeted" is bat-shit crazy. In this situation, I think the entire home-life was highly toxic for the adopted little girl, Marcia. This was pointed out by Father William Charbonneau himself; even though it was denied by the parental units, Laura and Jerry Goodin, it's evident to the reader that those two had an unusually isolating relationship with Marcia, preventing her from having friends and experiences on her own outside of their own home. I won't say it's unlikely that Marcia may have created a lot of the incidents that occurred in their home - maybe for attention, maybe for some other reason. I'm really not here to judge. The author also managed to get his paws on the police reports; transcripts of the meeting between Laura, Jerry, and Father Charbonneau; a list of incidents, where they occurred, and whether or not Marcia was in the vicinity at the time; and personal witness accounts. What the author of Brownsville Road had was... um... his faith, a historical plaque in his yard, and politics. The color photos in Brownsville Road were better than the poor quality black-and-white photos in this book, but whatever. Hardly a deal-killer. The inclusion of all the other details really made up for that. There's no real answer to this one. While I feel the Brownsville Road book was written for whatever political agenda the author may have had, I did not get that impression with this book. Hall grew up hearing about this account and was able to tell the story without getting too involved in a personal sense. The eyewitness accounts are interesting, as most witness accounts are just in how varied they can be. The fact that Marcia had allegedly took the blame for everything that happened was not convincing to a lot of people in Bridgeport, CT then or now, apparently. The fact that no one really knows what happened to Marcia by the time she was a late teenager also doesn't bode well. It would be nice to know her thoughts on the story now that she's an adult and neither Jerry nor Laura are still alive. First and foremost I hope Marcia got some counseling at some point in her life; her life was hard enough from what it sounds like before the Goodins took her in, but then she was never really allowed to breathe on her own once in their home, so poltergeist activity or not, that kid needed some help. So, yeah, whatever. Not exactly the most thrilling read, but still better than some other books in the field that take a more theological perspective. At least here there are other options and the author allows others to offer up their suggestions for what may have really occurred. Do I think the house in Bridgeport is the "world's most haunted house"? Meh, I don't know about that. But there was supposedly a talking cat, so I guess maybe. You don't get that very often in other haunted house accounts.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Linda Johnson

    I first heard about the Lindley St house a few years ago reading about Bridgeport on the internet and subsequently found the authors Facebook page about the release of his book. Ironically, I soon found out that I only lived a few blocks away from the house. When I found out the Warren's were involved with this case, the house and book had my full attention! I even somewhat became obsessed with the house, often driving by trying to imagine the crowd of people that were camped outside 40 years ag I first heard about the Lindley St house a few years ago reading about Bridgeport on the internet and subsequently found the authors Facebook page about the release of his book. Ironically, I soon found out that I only lived a few blocks away from the house. When I found out the Warren's were involved with this case, the house and book had my full attention! I even somewhat became obsessed with the house, often driving by trying to imagine the crowd of people that were camped outside 40 years ago and thinking about the Goodin family and what happened to them inside of the walls of this small, modest home. Well, I just finished reading the book and it didn't disappoint. I am left feeling so much empathy for the Goodin family, I can't even imagine the ridicule and bullying that the entire family endured, and knowing that this was very much real and not a hoax as deemed by the police department. It would have been impossible for a 10 year old girl to be responsible for the things that happened on Lindley St but realize that the police department had to do what they had to do to get rid of the crowds. I especially enjoyed the pictures of the family and of both the inside and outside of the house and thought that the author did a great job of representing and respecting all involved. Finally after 40 years the Goodin Family has been served some justice. It would have been great to hear Marcia's side of the story, but unfortunately the author was unable to locate her. Now for the Lindley St movie...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sek Han Foo

    I picked up this book thinking it was a horror but instead I got a written report clinically describing things falling down in a house.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Thank you, Bill, for finally giving us the facts from the reports and tapes that were hidden by the police when they deemed it was a hoax. It was an interesting read hearing from many different sources what was really happening in the house. I cannot imagine continuing to live in the situation that they were surrounded by for as long as they did!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Darlene

    This book was given lots of effort with excellent proof and police reports of the investigation. I appreciate that author wasn't trying to convince you to believe but simply lured you in with facts. I recommend it if paranormal stuff is your cup of tea. This book was given lots of effort with excellent proof and police reports of the investigation. I appreciate that author wasn't trying to convince you to believe but simply lured you in with facts. I recommend it if paranormal stuff is your cup of tea.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I quite liked this book but if I ever end up in a mental institution, it will be because I went mad wondering what happened to Marcia Goodwin.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bert Z

    I am positively chilled. This story is scary, I mean really scary. I’m surprised that this isn’t more of a well known case, the thing that sets this apart from many of the other haunted house stories of the era is the sheer amount of witnesses to paranormal phenomena. So often in these kinds of stories it’s only the family that experiences the happenings whereas with this story there are hundreds of testimonials from neighbours, policemen, firemen and many passers-by. Props must go to the author I am positively chilled. This story is scary, I mean really scary. I’m surprised that this isn’t more of a well known case, the thing that sets this apart from many of the other haunted house stories of the era is the sheer amount of witnesses to paranormal phenomena. So often in these kinds of stories it’s only the family that experiences the happenings whereas with this story there are hundreds of testimonials from neighbours, policemen, firemen and many passers-by. Props must go to the author who has done a fantastic job writing this book, it’s obvious he’s gone to great lengths to find out as much as he can about this case, his writing is really good and if he decides to write anything else like this I will definitely be checking it out. Spooky stuff! I highly recommend reading it if you’re that way inclined and the spirit is willing. Ed & Lorraine Warren feature heavily too so bonus points for that.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sue Bridehead (A Pseudonym)

    I read this on the recommendation of a friend and former coworker. A group of us were at dinner talking about ghosts, a subject that often comes up if I spend enough time with other Yankees. He told us a chilling tale about his daughter and wife seeing a ghost in an old house they were housesitting and cleaning. Then he went on to cite a theory from someone he knew who'd written a book about the most haunted house in Connecticut. The theory: ghost activity happens more frequently in houses near I read this on the recommendation of a friend and former coworker. A group of us were at dinner talking about ghosts, a subject that often comes up if I spend enough time with other Yankees. He told us a chilling tale about his daughter and wife seeing a ghost in an old house they were housesitting and cleaning. Then he went on to cite a theory from someone he knew who'd written a book about the most haunted house in Connecticut. The theory: ghost activity happens more frequently in houses near water. Of course, I had to read that book. So I finally got around to it, and here's what I think: The story itself is fascinating, but the way it's told is draggy. The author uses a lot of passive voice in the first 2/3, and as a professional ghostwriter and editor, this writing style held me back from full immersion in the story. It's clear the author isn't too practiced in describing action or emotional states like fear. However, the story itself is fascinating: a poltergeist destroying a tiny old house where two older parents took care of a home schooled, adopted, socially isolated girl. Featuring floating refrigerators! Lay-Z-Boy chairs that rotate in the air! Most of it witnessed by priests, neighbors, and Bridgeport, CT police officers. (I imagine Bridgeport PD in the 1970s is not too different from NYPD: salt-of-the-earth skeptics.) The story is of particular interest to me personally because it happened the year I was born and it unfolded in my home state. The strongest part of the book, by far, begins with the story's lengthy denouement. Readers would be wise to skim the descriptions of the haunting itself, then slow down when you get to the transcript of the priests advising the parents to get counseling for themselves. That's a real-life, word-for-word conversation between very insightful and well-read clergy people and a very repressed and fearful mother. I found it fascinating to read. The interviews with first-hand witnesses were also good; in particular, conversations with former seminarian Paul Eno, who offers some sci-fi type theories to explain everything he and others saw and felt (and everything paranormal and unexplained in general). This is where the bodies-of-water/loose soil theory comes into play. Overall, worth a read at Halloween time, especially if you're from the Northeast. Fans of The Conjuring may enjoy, as The Warrens do make their inevitable appearance. And for the record, I don't believe in this stuff. Though like Fox Mulder, I want to.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Paolucci

    My aunt and cousins lived a few houses down from this house on an adjacent street. This would be a little over ten years after the incidents described in this book. We played over there in the street whenever I visited, and my cousin more than once had told me the house used to be haunted. I thought he was just messing with me, so I never took him seriously. It was weird reading about what happened, and all the street names and locations that are still very familiar to me after all this time (my My aunt and cousins lived a few houses down from this house on an adjacent street. This would be a little over ten years after the incidents described in this book. We played over there in the street whenever I visited, and my cousin more than once had told me the house used to be haunted. I thought he was just messing with me, so I never took him seriously. It was weird reading about what happened, and all the street names and locations that are still very familiar to me after all this time (my cousin moved when I was in my late teens). As for the book itself, I couldn't put it down and finished it in two days. I'm not a fast reader, so this is saying a lot. I had expected it to be bogged down with dry, uninteresting information about the area, the history of the house itself, the family's history, but the author sticks mainly to relevant information, which makes the pacing very quick. That being said, there is still a wealth of fascinating information in these pages, every bit of it worth including. No filler, or throwaway text. I was very pleased with this book overall and appreciate not only the lengths to which the author went to research this story, but his own enthusiasm and personal interest in these events.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    First of all, I must admit to being somewhat of a skeptic where haunted houses are concerned. That being said, I kept an open mind while reading this book. I found it to be fascinating and hard to put down. The author provided page after page of credible evidence from policeman, firemen, clergy etc. The book was very well researched and well written. I may still be a skeptic but I certainly can't disprove what the evidence provided. I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads. First of all, I must admit to being somewhat of a skeptic where haunted houses are concerned. That being said, I kept an open mind while reading this book. I found it to be fascinating and hard to put down. The author provided page after page of credible evidence from policeman, firemen, clergy etc. The book was very well researched and well written. I may still be a skeptic but I certainly can't disprove what the evidence provided. I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Charles M.

    Unfortunately another one of t5he "most haunted" paranormal books which promise much and deliver silly tidbits, etc. One of worst books read this year! Unfortunately another one of t5he "most haunted" paranormal books which promise much and deliver silly tidbits, etc. One of worst books read this year!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I received this book through the First Reads giveaway program on Goodreads. Review to follow!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Bielawa

    William Hall does details the events at the house on Lindley Street in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Though I appreciate the research, detailed reports and cataloging of events, and post analysis, the writing just didn’t pull me in or keep me engaged. I enjoyed the book mainly because I grew up not far from the house and know the story very well. (I remember my father took me to see the house and crowds of people. Funny, I can recall being disappointed that I myself didn’t see any of the flying objec William Hall does details the events at the house on Lindley Street in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Though I appreciate the research, detailed reports and cataloging of events, and post analysis, the writing just didn’t pull me in or keep me engaged. I enjoyed the book mainly because I grew up not far from the house and know the story very well. (I remember my father took me to see the house and crowds of people. Funny, I can recall being disappointed that I myself didn’t see any of the flying objects or events right there in front of me. Ah, childhood…) The author does a good job explaining all of the events in a chronological way, providing pictures and supporting documents (newspapers, police reports, eyewitness accounts from family, friends, police, firemen, and paranormal researchers). But to be honest, if this book took place somewhere else and I wasn’t so familiar with the places, streets, and people, I don’t think I would’ve enjoyed the book as much as I did.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Barry Ephraim

    I wish that I could say that the investigation was truly scientific, but sadly it wasn't even for the early 1970's. The author did his best with the information he was able to dig up. I wish that I could say that the investigation was truly scientific, but sadly it wasn't even for the early 1970's. The author did his best with the information he was able to dig up.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vinncent Mauro

    This book was very insightful! The research conducted by the author was fantastic. Even though sometimes there were some far fetched parts that seemed difficult to believe and repetitive, the authors construction of the book was great!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    Garbage. The guy was going for Jay Anson "Amityville Horror" money, but couldn't write a coherent narrative. He describes absolutely improbable things happening (TV sets, refrigerators hovering in mid-air) all of a sudden, with destruction to the house and property all around, then these people just continue on with their lives and make dinner like nothing happened. The first half of the book is all detailed and repetitive description of poltergeist activity, and then... nothing. It just stops. Garbage. The guy was going for Jay Anson "Amityville Horror" money, but couldn't write a coherent narrative. He describes absolutely improbable things happening (TV sets, refrigerators hovering in mid-air) all of a sudden, with destruction to the house and property all around, then these people just continue on with their lives and make dinner like nothing happened. The first half of the book is all detailed and repetitive description of poltergeist activity, and then... nothing. It just stops. Then he's listing interviews with policemen and family friends. The guy admits to being a magician, he's sure no author. He's so sure that he's "investigated" and proved the events were real by repetition, I'm pretty sure this guy could get a job with the Trump Administration, about that same level grasp of reality. Don't waste your time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jacquelyne Aubuchon

    This is a fairly short read, but the author is going on my fantasy dinner party list of guests. He recounts a fascinating history of events for an average family back in the 70s. His background as a magician led me to believe he would approach the events with a skeptical eye, but I was most impressed with his research and logical order used to lay out the book and events of the story. I'm left with a heafty case of curiosity as to how these events actually occurred. It's not written to scare whi This is a fairly short read, but the author is going on my fantasy dinner party list of guests. He recounts a fascinating history of events for an average family back in the 70s. His background as a magician led me to believe he would approach the events with a skeptical eye, but I was most impressed with his research and logical order used to lay out the book and events of the story. I'm left with a heafty case of curiosity as to how these events actually occurred. It's not written to scare which is refreshing. I found this book through a recent interview with the author on a podcast I frequent and was not disappointed.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    I enjoyed this book but I felt that I wanted to know more about what happened after the poltergeist activity ended. I would've liked to have read Marcia's memories of the events and what may have occurred in her teen years. I also would've liked to have read Lorraine Warren's observations. And more background on Laura, especially the speculation s that she may have had other children. It wasn't particularly scary and it was refreshing to have so many credible witnesses. I enjoyed this book but I felt that I wanted to know more about what happened after the poltergeist activity ended. I would've liked to have read Marcia's memories of the events and what may have occurred in her teen years. I also would've liked to have read Lorraine Warren's observations. And more background on Laura, especially the speculation s that she may have had other children. It wasn't particularly scary and it was refreshing to have so many credible witnesses.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This book and these people and this poltergeist all made my head hurt. And, also terrified me. But the writing was also NOT GOOD, and the narration of the audio book was only OKAY. However, the story is bizarre and terrifying and confusing AF. But you’d do better to google the house and read one of the many websites that summarize the story and not spend hours of your life reading/listening to this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Trivett

    This really lost steam mid way through. The photos included aren't documentation of extraordinary occurrences but only pictures of key players and scenery. This book was quite tedious to finish. I will say it was an extremely detailed and researched account. This really lost steam mid way through. The photos included aren't documentation of extraordinary occurrences but only pictures of key players and scenery. This book was quite tedious to finish. I will say it was an extremely detailed and researched account.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    True or not, it was boring as all get-out. Wait till it's free. True or not, it was boring as all get-out. Wait till it's free.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aurelie Peeters

    A true story is always very interesting, especially when there are a lot of reports, witnesses,.. Aldo I think their are a lot of black holes in this story. How can it suddenly stopped, while it still was active by spirits/ghosts/poltergeist. It's also strange that Laura and Jerry stayed in the house as long as they lived. Even if your a sceptical person about spirituality and don't have any explanation aboutsuch unexplained things that happens in your house, you really have to admit that such t A true story is always very interesting, especially when there are a lot of reports, witnesses,.. Aldo I think their are a lot of black holes in this story. How can it suddenly stopped, while it still was active by spirits/ghosts/poltergeist. It's also strange that Laura and Jerry stayed in the house as long as they lived. Even if your a sceptical person about spirituality and don't have any explanation aboutsuch unexplained things that happens in your house, you really have to admit that such things need to be solved out and it seems to me that in this situation a lot of people saw things but never did what had to be done. Instead and also because of Laura and Jerry's behavior nothing happened to solve this mystery. I totally understand that it must have been really hard for Laura and Jerry, especially when all those idiots people, journalists, media,... came to interfere in this but leaving things like it never happened, I really can not understand this. It means that you don't want to see the true, and in what I've read (in the conversation between Jerry, Laura, the Priest and Boyce) they weren't open to solve the problem. That's why I don't believe that all of that suddenly stopped, they just lived with it until their dead. That may be the cause why Marcia when back to her family in Canada. I don't doubt about it that there where a few poltergeists in that house, also that what Marcia mentioned that she talked with her grand father, maybe he was one of them. Because like it mentioned he was angry because he did not understand why she stayed with Jerry and Laura instead of going to her family. I also don't understand why know one ever asked Marcia more about this...Also why did they after the media claimed it was a hoax of Marcia, why did Jerry and Laura pointed it the fault in to Ed and Lorrain. They really were the best help they could get. It was really interesting to read, I believe what happend in that house but I have my thoughts about how Jerry and Laura lived their life with this. I think they did not want to see the true. The last thing I wonder about all this:How is it in the house right know? The house is empty for years, but is their still the paranormal activity and present of someone/something?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    I borrowed this because it sounded pretty interesting, although I had no idea what I was getting into. Also, I've never heard of the house on Lindley Street so this was all new to me. Basically, this is about a haunting that took place on Lindley Street in Bridgeport. The book purports to be an objective account and analysis of the affair, but it's quite clearly on the side of "this is real". This haunted house revolved around the Goodin family - Gerald (nicknamed Jerry), Laura, and the little gi I borrowed this because it sounded pretty interesting, although I had no idea what I was getting into. Also, I've never heard of the house on Lindley Street so this was all new to me. Basically, this is about a haunting that took place on Lindley Street in Bridgeport. The book purports to be an objective account and analysis of the affair, but it's quite clearly on the side of "this is real". This haunted house revolved around the Goodin family - Gerald (nicknamed Jerry), Laura, and the little girl they adopted, Marcia. Jerry and Laura had a little boy, who tragically passed away. Because of that, they were overprotective of Marcia. And then one day, weird stuff started happening. Things were moved, first small, and then large. And eventually, even the couch moved in the presence of eyewitnesses. In their attempt to get help, the Goodins called in quite a few people, but after a while the case was dismissed as a hoax. The book starts with an account of the case, and then it gives information such as witness interviews, interview transcripts with the Goodins, etc. There are also a lot of photos but the quality isn't good and they seem to be there more for atmosphere than to illustrate a point (or maybe it was just my ecopy?). While the book repeatedly mentions that the media called this a hoax, it never really goes into detail why or gives the other side. The most I can tell is that because Marcia admitted to faking some things, they assumed everything was faked. The book takes the stance that some things (the stuff that was admitted) was faked but there were actual paranormal phenomena involved. I thought this was a fascinating read, but I would have much preferred to see the other side of the story as well and be allowed to make up my own mind instead of being told this was an objective account and that I should believe it. And this is another personal preference, but I would prefer the research to be woven into the narrative rather than be a separate part. This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Brilliantly pieced together. The grand majority of books/reports which follow this subject matter tend to lean towards the dramatic... The degree of intensity that any given event is clothed in becomes over-analyzed and flashy because people just like to be scared. This work, by contrast, lacks the bells and whistles of an average "ghost story": It is refreshingly dry, getting right to the point and sticking with it. The story of the family in question is recounted and then reflected upon, nice Brilliantly pieced together. The grand majority of books/reports which follow this subject matter tend to lean towards the dramatic... The degree of intensity that any given event is clothed in becomes over-analyzed and flashy because people just like to be scared. This work, by contrast, lacks the bells and whistles of an average "ghost story": It is refreshingly dry, getting right to the point and sticking with it. The story of the family in question is recounted and then reflected upon, nice and simply. That's the thing to remember, when you go pick up this book. It isn't a scary story; it's the foundation for a hypothesis... and it's just wonderful. Here, Hall delves into what a lot of paranormal enthusiasts don't want to think about. One would think it'd be common sense to avoid saying, "Well that was spooky - must be a ghost!" and call it a day. There are physical, "real world" details that have a tremendous influence on things which many will readily glorify for the sake of something weird to tell their friends. Always, however, there are other details to consider: variations in geotechnical elements; the credibility of authorities who become involved; and the psychological frame of mind which witnesses maintain. But this gets a little loftier. Aside from the rational, even slightly more farfetched ideas are explored. Proposals of spontaneous dematerialization, matter interpenetrating matter - for goodness' sakes, Hall even pokes at the Multiverse Theory! Witness testimonials, reports, control groups - if you have any interest in the research behind these happenings, for the love of all things unusual, go read this book! When both logical closure AND unusual arguments go head to head, what more could a reader want? And at the end of the line, there is no conclusion. You think for yourself. The reader of this is not brought to a decision, or even really given an end, but prompted to reach their own [opinion versus belief] by being presented with suggestion after suggestion - and I think that's fantastic. "Then we will discover, for the second time in his history: the atom."

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    In 1974, the Goodin family of Bridgeport, Connecticut, find themselves in a very difficult situation as they are confronted with a poltergeist. Their tough times actually went back a few years, when their son was born with cerebral palsy. Jerry and Laura, the parents, rallied around him, making sure he could every opportunity possible. Unfortunately, he died a few years into his life. Both Laura and Jerry struggled with the loss of their son, but decided to adopt, and end up adopting a little Na In 1974, the Goodin family of Bridgeport, Connecticut, find themselves in a very difficult situation as they are confronted with a poltergeist. Their tough times actually went back a few years, when their son was born with cerebral palsy. Jerry and Laura, the parents, rallied around him, making sure he could every opportunity possible. Unfortunately, he died a few years into his life. Both Laura and Jerry struggled with the loss of their son, but decided to adopt, and end up adopting a little Native girl from Canada called Alicia. It was not long after Alicia arrived that they found strange things happening throughout their small home. At first, it started with odd noises that were unexplained. Over the course of a few years, things developed into objects, including furniture, moving around and shaking. This lead to an investigation by the Warrens, a famous couple who were known for investigating hauntings, including those in Amityville, New York (Amityville Horror fame) and Burrillville, Rhode Island (The Conjuring fame) as well as many, many others. Their investigation as well as that of another group delved into what might have really happened in the house in 1974. The book is written using original interviews by both investigations as well as those from the local police department. Hall definitely seems to have done everything possible to find out with the troubles on Lindley Street in Bridgeport were truly a haunting or do to human intervention. I ended up picking up this book after the author visited my library to listen to his friend Paul Eno, who joined the Warrens on their investigation in Bridgeport, was talking about a number of other paranormal cases he had explored and included in a book that was published last fall. Hall is definitely extremely thorough, including a number of photographs and other graphics to support the narrative text. He also includes a number of primary documents within the appendix of the book. It is definitely worth a read if you are interested in the topic.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steph Young

    Alright, this book was kind of a hot mess. It was written by a someone who cares A LOT, but who doesn’t seem to have much experience with investigative writing. The last 1/4 of the book really saved the whole thing because it was cut and dry police reports of the incidents that took place. I wanted to read this book because it happened in the recent past (1974) in Bridgeport, CT! (Just twenty or so minutes from where I live.)There is SO much to this story, and the author just does not do it just Alright, this book was kind of a hot mess. It was written by a someone who cares A LOT, but who doesn’t seem to have much experience with investigative writing. The last 1/4 of the book really saved the whole thing because it was cut and dry police reports of the incidents that took place. I wanted to read this book because it happened in the recent past (1974) in Bridgeport, CT! (Just twenty or so minutes from where I live.)There is SO much to this story, and the author just does not do it justice. His writing style seemed to focus solely on convincing the reader that it was TRUE TRUE TRUE in such a frantic way, instead of just giving the cut and dry tale of what happened, which I’ve found I prefer in non-fiction writing. Topics that didn’t get the focus they deserved : Marcia’s adoptive background/the Goodin’s deceased son and how that impacted the familial relationship/created an overbearing atmosphere for Marcia, Marcia’s admission of the ‘hoax,’ Marcia’s mental health issues, Marcia’s apparent falling out with her overprotective parents later in life. And probably a million other things, all Marcia related. MORE MARCIA! Reading the police reports is what started to convince me that maybe something supernatural really had taken place at this house. The rest of the book was just an explosion of incidents that moved on to other incidents that moved on to other incidents, and it was actually exhausting to read. I recommend this TOPIC, but not necessarily this book

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    This book was based on many hours of recorded testimony. There are dozens of witnesses who claim that the things that happened were real. I was curious, but let down. My issue is that despite all the research conducted, this book did a lousy job of explaining the story. It seems like it was written under the assumption that anyone reading the book is already familiar with this story. There are hints of explanations without substance, topics introduced with no follow through, and beginnings of id This book was based on many hours of recorded testimony. There are dozens of witnesses who claim that the things that happened were real. I was curious, but let down. My issue is that despite all the research conducted, this book did a lousy job of explaining the story. It seems like it was written under the assumption that anyone reading the book is already familiar with this story. There are hints of explanations without substance, topics introduced with no follow through, and beginnings of ideas without closure. For instance, when did the events at the house stop, if at all? What were the results of the personality tests that were administered to the family? How did the hoax theory play out? Also, how could this family supposedly witness all these terrifying things then make dinner as if nothing was wrong? That seems fishy to me. It’s clear that the author needed more help with this project, as he could not write a coherent story. It is poorly written and doesn’t flow well. Also, only 5 years after this book was published the websites referenced are no longer active.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dorothy Smith

    So...total skeptic here....plus self Admitted scaredy cat. (No pun intended...you’ll understand if you read it). Interesting read. Enjoyable. The police reports are super interesting and on their face seem like compelling witness accounts for sure. But objectively,as someone who had never even heard of this place, my big question is about the personal bias of the officers and fireman who saw stuff. Nothing of their background or beliefs. To me the family isn’t super credible. But honestly maybe So...total skeptic here....plus self Admitted scaredy cat. (No pun intended...you’ll understand if you read it). Interesting read. Enjoyable. The police reports are super interesting and on their face seem like compelling witness accounts for sure. But objectively,as someone who had never even heard of this place, my big question is about the personal bias of the officers and fireman who saw stuff. Nothing of their background or beliefs. To me the family isn’t super credible. But honestly maybe I think that because of my own personal bias. I can’t relate to the fact that they even stayed through one night of that shit happening. I consider myself a fairly reasonable person and after one thing flying off my wall Much less anything hitting me or my kids I’d have been gone and never returned. Truth. Not kidding even in the slightest. This is why I kind of don’t believe it. But I could be totally wrong ;-)

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