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The Murdered Sun

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When sensors indicate a possible wormhole nearby, Captain Janeway is eager to investigate - hoping to find a shortcut back to the Federation. Instead, she discovers a solar system being systematically pillaged by the warlike Akerians. The last thing Janeway wants is to get caught up in someone else's war, but to check out the wormhole - and to protect the innocent inhabitan When sensors indicate a possible wormhole nearby, Captain Janeway is eager to investigate - hoping to find a shortcut back to the Federation. Instead, she discovers a solar system being systematically pillaged by the warlike Akerians. The last thing Janeway wants is to get caught up in someone else's war, but to check out the wormhole - and to protect the innocent inhabitants of Veruna Four - she has no choice but to take on the Akerians. But who knows what unexpected dangers lurk beneath the crimson glow of the murdered sun?


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When sensors indicate a possible wormhole nearby, Captain Janeway is eager to investigate - hoping to find a shortcut back to the Federation. Instead, she discovers a solar system being systematically pillaged by the warlike Akerians. The last thing Janeway wants is to get caught up in someone else's war, but to check out the wormhole - and to protect the innocent inhabitan When sensors indicate a possible wormhole nearby, Captain Janeway is eager to investigate - hoping to find a shortcut back to the Federation. Instead, she discovers a solar system being systematically pillaged by the warlike Akerians. The last thing Janeway wants is to get caught up in someone else's war, but to check out the wormhole - and to protect the innocent inhabitants of Veruna Four - she has no choice but to take on the Akerians. But who knows what unexpected dangers lurk beneath the crimson glow of the murdered sun?

30 review for The Murdered Sun

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    By far my favorite Voyager book so far. I enjoyed the interplay between the three groups very much. Chakotay seems less one note, even while playing his one note, throughout and I'm not even sure why. Tom Paris's arc is very good, it would have been great if this sort of xenophobia would have been explored more in his character within the show. The pseudo-science was about as interesting as Trek pseudo-science gets, and the plot moved quickly and efficiently. Overall I would highly suggest any f By far my favorite Voyager book so far. I enjoyed the interplay between the three groups very much. Chakotay seems less one note, even while playing his one note, throughout and I'm not even sure why. Tom Paris's arc is very good, it would have been great if this sort of xenophobia would have been explored more in his character within the show. The pseudo-science was about as interesting as Trek pseudo-science gets, and the plot moved quickly and efficiently. Overall I would highly suggest any fan of Trek in general or Voyager specifically should give this yarn a spin.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Koan

    This book was short and sweet. The story was easy to understand and was actually quite predictable. The story followed almost the exact pattern that a typical episode of Voyager television would have, except this was more like the length of 1.5 or 2 episodes as opposed to 1. Christie Golden is definitely in my top 3 Star Trek authors. She really captures the voice of the characters and the pacing of the story really well. I was surprised how well she did with this story, given that this was her f This book was short and sweet. The story was easy to understand and was actually quite predictable. The story followed almost the exact pattern that a typical episode of Voyager television would have, except this was more like the length of 1.5 or 2 episodes as opposed to 1. Christie Golden is definitely in my top 3 Star Trek authors. She really captures the voice of the characters and the pacing of the story really well. I was surprised how well she did with this story, given that this was her first sci-fi novel and one of her first media-tie in fiction novels. There is actually some ground work in the character of Janeway and Chakotay that I think Kirsten Beyer used for her novels. I don't have much to gripe about, other than that it could have been longer, but Star Trek books at this time worked at this pace, so I'm happy with the book. Overall, fun, easy, and a good change of pace. 7.9 out of 10!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Perez

    One of my favorite Voyager books. It was an interesting plot, and a fun fast pace read. I also love how Christie Golden keeps the characters... well in character. I loved that the new aliens were really apart of the story and had so much development, I wish these bear like creatures had been on the show as well! The only bad or not so great thing about the book was that I did see one twist coming but it was still a great read. I recommend all of Christie Golden's books she does so well with the v One of my favorite Voyager books. It was an interesting plot, and a fun fast pace read. I also love how Christie Golden keeps the characters... well in character. I loved that the new aliens were really apart of the story and had so much development, I wish these bear like creatures had been on the show as well! The only bad or not so great thing about the book was that I did see one twist coming but it was still a great read. I recommend all of Christie Golden's books she does so well with the voyager characters.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    How to write a solid, enjoyable "Star Trek" novel: (1) provide an interesting, unique scientific puzzle for the crew to solve, (2) provide some action & tension that actually conveys tension, (3) create a situation where Trekkian ideas of peace, forgiveness, and acceptance are all in play, and (4) take one of my least favourite Trek series, capture the crew perfectly, and put them in a story where I thoroughly enjoyed the ride, in spite of my antipathy for "Voyager". Well done, Christine Golden. How to write a solid, enjoyable "Star Trek" novel: (1) provide an interesting, unique scientific puzzle for the crew to solve, (2) provide some action & tension that actually conveys tension, (3) create a situation where Trekkian ideas of peace, forgiveness, and acceptance are all in play, and (4) take one of my least favourite Trek series, capture the crew perfectly, and put them in a story where I thoroughly enjoyed the ride, in spite of my antipathy for "Voyager". Well done, Christine Golden.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    So, the last Voyager novel I read also involved Voyager getting caught up in a war between two alien species and I really did not like it. It felt like the author had never seen Voyager and did not know the characters at all. This book also deals with Voyager getting caught up in a war between two alien species but I enjoyed it quite a bit. This author did right what the other author did wrong. I really liked the alien species the Voyager crew tries to help and wish we could see them in a Star Tr So, the last Voyager novel I read also involved Voyager getting caught up in a war between two alien species and I really did not like it. It felt like the author had never seen Voyager and did not know the characters at all. This book also deals with Voyager getting caught up in a war between two alien species but I enjoyed it quite a bit. This author did right what the other author did wrong. I really liked the alien species the Voyager crew tries to help and wish we could see them in a Star Trek show or movie some day. Paris and Chakotay got the most focus here, and I liked glimpses into their inner thoughts. There was one "mysterious" plot point that was obvious long before the Big Reveal, and I wished the author hadn't tried to draw out the mystery. Still, this is possibly the best Star Trek novel not based on an episode that I've read. (I haven't read that many ST novels.) Recommended for Voyager fans.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Beet

    Very good star trek voyager novel the akerians reminded me of the kazon story was good author got the characters spot on not so much of the holographic Doctor in this story or kes either

  7. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    I admit that I was kind of worried about reading this book as I hadn't read anything by Christie Golden yet and I knew that she had many Voyager novels ahead of me. So, I was very happy that I quite enjoyed this one. It wasn't anything revolutionary or wholly original but she did a great job of capturing key characters like Janeway, Paris and especially Chakotay. I enjoyed the story and it was a neat idea but the twist (if you could call it that) was very predictable and expected. This may not s I admit that I was kind of worried about reading this book as I hadn't read anything by Christie Golden yet and I knew that she had many Voyager novels ahead of me. So, I was very happy that I quite enjoyed this one. It wasn't anything revolutionary or wholly original but she did a great job of capturing key characters like Janeway, Paris and especially Chakotay. I enjoyed the story and it was a neat idea but the twist (if you could call it that) was very predictable and expected. This may not sound like it but I quite enjoyed this book and look forward to Golden's other Star Trek works.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    This is one of my favorite Star Trek: Voyager novels. I love the story. I love how it's about forgotten history, shared history, the hope of saving an entire planet... It's a story that really draws you in. This is one of my favorite Star Trek: Voyager novels. I love the story. I love how it's about forgotten history, shared history, the hope of saving an entire planet... It's a story that really draws you in.

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

    Excellent STV book! Hard to believe this one was Ms. Golden's first ST book...actually her first SF book. She writes like one of the grand masters! Excellent STV book! Hard to believe this one was Ms. Golden's first ST book...actually her first SF book. She writes like one of the grand masters!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Soph

    These are starting to get more consistently good as they're settling into the characters consistently. Chakotay has a good arc in this one. Paris has a decent one (it would be better if not for the flaw being something not really existing in the show, it just shows up to be a thing that he can have a story to resolve it in this book). Also, Paris having a thing against lizards and Janeway talking about being fond of them is hilarious in the context of the Threshold episode. (I wonder how intenti These are starting to get more consistently good as they're settling into the characters consistently. Chakotay has a good arc in this one. Paris has a decent one (it would be better if not for the flaw being something not really existing in the show, it just shows up to be a thing that he can have a story to resolve it in this book). Also, Paris having a thing against lizards and Janeway talking about being fond of them is hilarious in the context of the Threshold episode. (I wonder how intentional that was bc googling some dates says that episode aired about a month before this book came out.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    David

    This is an excellent ST: Voyager novel. Virtually flawless. Great place to start reading Voyager.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Having recently read John Jackson Miller’s Star Trek: The Next Generation novel Takedown, I decided to further my plunge into Trek with another book. It worked well with John, so I picked another Star Wars author that I liked. In this case it was Christie Golden with her Star Trek: Voyager novel The Murdered Sun. Now I’ve never watched Star Trek: Voyager, so I’m unfamiliar with the characters. On the other hand, this is only the second Star Trek novel I’ve ever ready, so I’m not sure which is mor Having recently read John Jackson Miller’s Star Trek: The Next Generation novel Takedown, I decided to further my plunge into Trek with another book. It worked well with John, so I picked another Star Wars author that I liked. In this case it was Christie Golden with her Star Trek: Voyager novel The Murdered Sun. Now I’ve never watched Star Trek: Voyager, so I’m unfamiliar with the characters. On the other hand, this is only the second Star Trek novel I’ve ever ready, so I’m not sure which is more significant. However, as a long time Star Wars reader, Christie did a great job writing the story in a way that new readers like myself could still enjoy it. The characters are well developed and slowly introduced so it’s easy enough to get grasp on the cast. There’s also some background on what the crew of the Voyager is up to and what’s going on with them. As an old school Trek fan, this story had the right amount of trappings to tap into my nostalgia and interest in the Trek universe. It’s also just a fun sci-fi story mixing together alien species, cultures, technologies into an intriguing plot. That said, The Murdered Sun is a lot like an elaborate multi-part television episode. The crew of the Voyager discovers an anomaly that they decide to investigate. It leads them to two alien factions who are at war, and Voyager gets caught in the middle. The aliens are interesting and the story does a great job of developing them. It takes the time to explore what they’re like, how their history has affected them, and the ties they develop with the crew of the Voyager. They get intertwined into the plot and the action very craftily without any info dumps. Furthermore, I really liked how the crew of the Voyager played out in the story. They’re led by Captain Janeway who is very much her own character. She doesn’t fall into the same molds as Kirk and Picard. In turn, she’s backed by a colorful crew, yet only two of them really stand out in this novel. Both Chakotay and Tom Paris get some excellent character building. Each of them form ties with the first alien species they encounter. Chakotay finds common ground with the way their beliefs are similar to his. Tom Paris alternatively finds discord with how snakelike they appear, but in training them to fly, forms a bond with them that transcends physical barriers. Each character story was very enjoyable. While it might not be a sci-fi epic, The Murdered Sun is a fun sci-fi adventure. Whether you’re a Voyager fan or a Star Wars fan looking to diversify your fandom, this book is worth checking out. I give it a four out of five.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I've been going through the Star Trek Voyager books and this is the first in the series where I felt the characters were finally in sync with what we saw in the TV episodes. The earlier books are for the most part good stories but the characters came across as a bit bland but that is not the fault of the authors. The show was also new at the time and there wasn't a lot for them to work with. Christie Golden had access to more background material and it shows. The Starship Voyager has found a wor I've been going through the Star Trek Voyager books and this is the first in the series where I felt the characters were finally in sync with what we saw in the TV episodes. The earlier books are for the most part good stories but the characters came across as a bit bland but that is not the fault of the authors. The show was also new at the time and there wasn't a lot for them to work with. Christie Golden had access to more background material and it shows. The Starship Voyager has found a wormhole but the area is controlled by a nasty Empire. Despite Neelix's protestations Janeway orders the crew to investigate. They find a dying world in need of help and several strange surprises. Chakotay and Paris play prominent roles in this story. Part of me had to laugh out loud at Paris having to overcome his distaste for the appearance of the aliens because they reminded him of lizards. Viewers of the TV series might wonder "Was this supposed to be a joke?" Despite that he had a good arc and some great action scenes. I left off one star because I'm not a big fan of "Getting into the alien's head and details of their world'. I understand that some readers like that sort of thing but to me it bogs the story down too much. However that is a personal preference thing and not the fault of the writer. This will probably go on my pile of books that I like to read again and again, right up there with my personal favorites from Star Trek Original Series books Prime Directive and Death Count.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Hall

    After being disappointed by a couple of the 2 of the last 3 books in the Voyager series, this one was a breath of fresh air. This felt like a complete story, with accurate representations of the characters. It introduced new species that felt genuine and unique. This would have been a two-part episode had it been a part of the TV series. The star of the episode is Tom Paris, who had to overcome his bias and uncomfortable feelings towards an alien species to work with them. As the story progresses After being disappointed by a couple of the 2 of the last 3 books in the Voyager series, this one was a breath of fresh air. This felt like a complete story, with accurate representations of the characters. It introduced new species that felt genuine and unique. This would have been a two-part episode had it been a part of the TV series. The star of the episode is Tom Paris, who had to overcome his bias and uncomfortable feelings towards an alien species to work with them. As the story progresses he grows in respect, and even a fondness for them to the point of becoming self-sacrificing for their sake. Chakotay was also a key feature, as he felt a closeness with the aliens due to similarities between their culture and his own Native upbringings. This was handled well. The biggest gripe with the story was the loooong build up to the "big reveal," that got dragged out quite a bit. This wouldn't have been such a problem if not for the fact that the mystery was rather quite obvious. Not that it was a bad twist, but that it should not have been treated as such a pivotal point in the story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason Vargo

    Even though this story-again-starts with the crew wistfully trying to get home, it turns out to be far better than expected. One of the new alien races, the Akerans, aren’t much more than placeholders, but that’s also expected from the television series. The real bread and butter here is Tom Paris and his initial feelings toward a new ally. This is what Trek is made of: understanding, learning and friendship.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    this was an intriguing read with an interesting plotline and a fascinating alien race. Christie Golden is one of the few authors who writes tie-in books that actually watches the shows in order to understand and correctly write the characters, which is essential to making the story believable.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    A good book with an exciting and fun story. My only quip is the constant nagging about the Prime Directive. It makes sense at first, but as more is revealed about these people, its pretty apparent that the Prime Directive doesn't apply. A good book with an exciting and fun story. My only quip is the constant nagging about the Prime Directive. It makes sense at first, but as more is revealed about these people, its pretty apparent that the Prime Directive doesn't apply.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Absolutely one of my favorite Voyager books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Of all of the Star Trek Voyager books I've read I think this has to be the best one yet. Of all of the Star Trek Voyager books I've read I think this has to be the best one yet.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    Another great Voyager novel by Golden. Just like reading an episode. She's my fav Voyager author to date. Another great Voyager novel by Golden. Just like reading an episode. She's my fav Voyager author to date.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    My taste in prose has evolved since I last read this, probably in elementary school. But my taste in what I like about Star Trek stories hasn't as much. I have a new appreciation for character development and moments, but I'm so happy to realize that I still enjoyed this book: the Voyager two-part episode I wish we'd had, one that exhibits the potential of early Voyager seasons and the show's premise, and one which would easily have been one of my favorites. Including such beloved-by-me tropes as My taste in prose has evolved since I last read this, probably in elementary school. But my taste in what I like about Star Trek stories hasn't as much. I have a new appreciation for character development and moments, but I'm so happy to realize that I still enjoyed this book: the Voyager two-part episode I wish we'd had, one that exhibits the potential of early Voyager seasons and the show's premise, and one which would easily have been one of my favorites. Including such beloved-by-me tropes as: helping alien cultures learn about their heritage, but without patronizing; positive first contact; lost civilizations and forgotten histories; and even friendly dragons.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Caiden

    A decent Voyager novel. The alien race, the Verunians, have a very interesting history and culture. There is a strong plot twist at the end which I figured out. Chakotay and Paris are great and have things to do. I noticed while reading this that author's write Vulcan characters to take things literally in order for a bit of lightness. It gets annoying fast, and I'll be aware of it in the future. A decent Voyager novel. The alien race, the Verunians, have a very interesting history and culture. There is a strong plot twist at the end which I figured out. Chakotay and Paris are great and have things to do. I noticed while reading this that author's write Vulcan characters to take things literally in order for a bit of lightness. It gets annoying fast, and I'll be aware of it in the future.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jena Fi

    I loved it !

  24. 4 out of 5

    Frank Trek Davis

    I loved it. A great story with a satisfying, albeit predictable ending. I think Chakotay could have made the cover since he played a decent role in this story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Trussell

    It was ok. Predicable ending but some interesting ideas. However the plot got a bit stale by the last 70 pages and a result I was racing to finish the book because I lost interest in the story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Ah the comfort of escapist scifi novels.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Deleon

    I miss the t.v. shows! Reading this book was as good as looking at it. Thank you Christine Golden for writing an excellent story. A new fan!

  28. 5 out of 5

    R

    I really liked this one. I've seen some variations on the theme in the Trek universe, so I won't argue that it's wholly original, but I liked the treatment of it here. I thought the aliens and their experiences were interesting. I really liked this one. I've seen some variations on the theme in the Trek universe, so I won't argue that it's wholly original, but I liked the treatment of it here. I thought the aliens and their experiences were interesting.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    Another good Voyager book from Christie Golden. She's one of my favorite Star Trek authors (along with Kirsten Beyer), but this one fell short. Here's why: First of all, I can't even count the times Chakotay is described in this book simply as "the Indian". And I mean, yes, he is Indian, but do we have to call him that? I don't hear anybody referring to Harry Kim as "the Asian". It bothers me that Golden didn't find some other aspect of Chakotay to emphasize rather than his race and his spirit gu Another good Voyager book from Christie Golden. She's one of my favorite Star Trek authors (along with Kirsten Beyer), but this one fell short. Here's why: First of all, I can't even count the times Chakotay is described in this book simply as "the Indian". And I mean, yes, he is Indian, but do we have to call him that? I don't hear anybody referring to Harry Kim as "the Asian". It bothers me that Golden didn't find some other aspect of Chakotay to emphasize rather than his race and his spirit guide. The only books that have discussed Chakotay's character have narrowed in on that aspect and I'd just rather they don't worry about his race. They don't mention it for anyone else, after all. The second thing is the fact that this book again says "the Voyager" when referencing the ship. I know it's grammatically accurate, but it isn't logically accurate. It sounds awkward since no one in the show ever would say that. Third: it was predictable. There was one thing that Golden clearly wanted to make a shock but by the time she came around to revealing it, I had long figured it out. Other than those few pet peeves, this was a good book. I liked the aliens a lot: they were easy to picture in my head and were pretty unique. The story was good too. And it didn't focus on a Neelix arc: which is always great. :P

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tony Mcdowell

    I am a huge fan of the TV series voyager, my favourite episodes being those which contain Seven or the doctor. I dislike the Chakotay episodes immensely, with all the anthropological story lines. Unfortunately this book is a Chakotay episode, with no Seven or doctor storyline, ergo I give it 1 star It's a book of 3 parts: The first quarter is engaging, giving a sense of mystery and there's a bit of action and techno involved. So far so good. However the next half of the book (25% to 75% into the b I am a huge fan of the TV series voyager, my favourite episodes being those which contain Seven or the doctor. I dislike the Chakotay episodes immensely, with all the anthropological story lines. Unfortunately this book is a Chakotay episode, with no Seven or doctor storyline, ergo I give it 1 star It's a book of 3 parts: The first quarter is engaging, giving a sense of mystery and there's a bit of action and techno involved. So far so good. However the next half of the book (25% to 75% into the book) is like walking through treacle. A character can't walk down a corridor into the turbo lift without spotting a scratch on the wall which reminds them of this that and the other. They can't get into the turbo lift without something being wrong with the controls, then the lift sends their thoughts reeling to some other background storyline, taking a whole chapter to do so. (The corridor/ lift scenario doesn't happen in the book, it's only my example) The over-descriptiveness doesn't help either; the description of an alien's outfit can take a full,page and at this point in the book I almost gave up. I skimmed through until the 75% point where things start to pick up again, but by this time I had honestly lost interest. I started regarding the voyager series from book number 1, and this is the first book that I really haven't liked.

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