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Digital Citizenship: The Internet, Society, and Participation

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This analysis of how the ability to participate in society online affects political and economic opportunity finds that technology use matters in wages and income and civic participation and voting. Just as education has promoted democracy and economic growth, the Internet has the potential to benefit society as a whole. Digital citizenship, or the ability to participate in This analysis of how the ability to participate in society online affects political and economic opportunity finds that technology use matters in wages and income and civic participation and voting. Just as education has promoted democracy and economic growth, the Internet has the potential to benefit society as a whole. Digital citizenship, or the ability to participate in society online, promotes social inclusion. But statistics show that significant segments of the population are still excluded from digital citizenship. The authors of this book define digital citizens as those who are online daily. By focusing on frequent use, they reconceptualize debates about the digital divide to include both the means and the skills to participate online. They offer new evidence (drawn from recent national opinion surveys and Current Population Surveys) that technology use matters for wages and income, and for civic engagement and voting. Digital Citizenship examines three aspects of participation in society online: economic opportunity, democratic participation, and inclusion in prevailing forms of communication. The authors find that Internet use at work increases wages, with less-educated and minority workers receiving the greatest benefit, and that Internet use is significantly related to political participation, especially among the young. The authors examine in detail the gaps in technological access among minorities and the poor and predict that this digital inequality is not likely to disappear in the near future. Public policy, they argue, must address educational and technological disparities if we are to achieve full participation and citizenship in the twenty-first century.


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This analysis of how the ability to participate in society online affects political and economic opportunity finds that technology use matters in wages and income and civic participation and voting. Just as education has promoted democracy and economic growth, the Internet has the potential to benefit society as a whole. Digital citizenship, or the ability to participate in This analysis of how the ability to participate in society online affects political and economic opportunity finds that technology use matters in wages and income and civic participation and voting. Just as education has promoted democracy and economic growth, the Internet has the potential to benefit society as a whole. Digital citizenship, or the ability to participate in society online, promotes social inclusion. But statistics show that significant segments of the population are still excluded from digital citizenship. The authors of this book define digital citizens as those who are online daily. By focusing on frequent use, they reconceptualize debates about the digital divide to include both the means and the skills to participate online. They offer new evidence (drawn from recent national opinion surveys and Current Population Surveys) that technology use matters for wages and income, and for civic engagement and voting. Digital Citizenship examines three aspects of participation in society online: economic opportunity, democratic participation, and inclusion in prevailing forms of communication. The authors find that Internet use at work increases wages, with less-educated and minority workers receiving the greatest benefit, and that Internet use is significantly related to political participation, especially among the young. The authors examine in detail the gaps in technological access among minorities and the poor and predict that this digital inequality is not likely to disappear in the near future. Public policy, they argue, must address educational and technological disparities if we are to achieve full participation and citizenship in the twenty-first century.

46 review for Digital Citizenship: The Internet, Society, and Participation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Signorelli

    "Digital Citizenship," in addition to offering a well-researched and finely-documented snapshot of the state of Internet use in the first few years of this century, opens with a great definition: "'Digital citizenship' is the ability to participate in society online" (p. 1). Chapters covering benefits of various aspects of society online (economic opportunity, civic engagement, and political participation) lead us to discussions of the digital divide, the impact of broadband on increases in digi "Digital Citizenship," in addition to offering a well-researched and finely-documented snapshot of the state of Internet use in the first few years of this century, opens with a great definition: "'Digital citizenship' is the ability to participate in society online" (p. 1). Chapters covering benefits of various aspects of society online (economic opportunity, civic engagement, and political participation) lead us to discussions of the digital divide, the impact of broadband on increases in digital citizenship, and public education and universal access--with an acknowledgement of the important roles libraries have played in making the Internet accessible to those who might otherwise not find their way to online resources. Through the writers’ work, we are treated to reminders that "[n]ot only is Internet use more widespread but creative new methods of online organizing emphasize political community rather than isolation" (p. 51); that the use of online news sources 'encourages civic engagement" (p. 62); and that online discussions "suggest the discourse of the salons of the 1890s that the early proponents of deliberative democracy idealized" (p. 72)--although personal experience provides plenty of examples of online discussions being comparable to a pie fight or a mud-wrestling match. Not surprisingly, "Digital Citizenship", like any book about the Internet, began showing its age as soon as it was published; it does, however, remain well worth reading for its views on how Internet use can foster a sense of civic inclusion--and how much remains to be done to create a fully-engaged and fully-informed digital citizenship.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Allegra

    This underscores the importance daily access and competency using the internet for participation in democracy and economic growth. This was a great addition to the authors' previous work, Virtual Inequality:Beyond the Digital Divide. A really important work for educator, policy makers, as well as parents to consider. This underscores the importance daily access and competency using the internet for participation in democracy and economic growth. This was a great addition to the authors' previous work, Virtual Inequality:Beyond the Digital Divide. A really important work for educator, policy makers, as well as parents to consider.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hey Sailor!

    for school. waa waa. but alas it's okay since i am gearing my focus to non-traditional library settings and emerging technologies. oohhhhhhhhhhh, buzzwords. for school. waa waa. but alas it's okay since i am gearing my focus to non-traditional library settings and emerging technologies. oohhhhhhhhhhh, buzzwords.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Kling

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    Ipublishcentral

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  46. 4 out of 5

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