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More Than Serving Tea: Asian American Women on Expectations, Relationships, Leadership and Faith

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Asian American women are caught between different worlds. Many grew up sensing that daughters were not as valuable as sons. Family expectations and cultural stereotypes assume that Asian American women can only have certain prescribed roles, as if our worth comes only through what we do for others.But God has good news for Asian American women. In his eyes, they are his be Asian American women are caught between different worlds. Many grew up sensing that daughters were not as valuable as sons. Family expectations and cultural stereotypes assume that Asian American women can only have certain prescribed roles, as if our worth comes only through what we do for others.But God has good news for Asian American women. In his eyes, they are his beloved daughters, created for greater purposes than the roles imposed upon us. In this one-of-a-kind book, editors Nikki Toyama and Tracey Gee and a team of Asian American women share how God has redeemed their stories and helped them move beyond cultural and gender constraints. With the help of biblical role models and modern-day mentors, these women have discovered how God works through their ethnic identity, freeing them to use their gifts and empowering them to serve and lead.The contributors include writers of East Asian heritage (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) as well as Southeast Asian (Filipina) and South Asian (Pakistani). Their diverse perspectives shed light on common threads in the Asian American experience, providing encouragement and guidance to others on the journey.God has so much more in store for Asian American women than cultural norms, gender roles and old stereotypes of geisha girls or dutiful daughters. Experience the joy and freedom of becoming the Asian American Christian woman God intended you to be.


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Asian American women are caught between different worlds. Many grew up sensing that daughters were not as valuable as sons. Family expectations and cultural stereotypes assume that Asian American women can only have certain prescribed roles, as if our worth comes only through what we do for others.But God has good news for Asian American women. In his eyes, they are his be Asian American women are caught between different worlds. Many grew up sensing that daughters were not as valuable as sons. Family expectations and cultural stereotypes assume that Asian American women can only have certain prescribed roles, as if our worth comes only through what we do for others.But God has good news for Asian American women. In his eyes, they are his beloved daughters, created for greater purposes than the roles imposed upon us. In this one-of-a-kind book, editors Nikki Toyama and Tracey Gee and a team of Asian American women share how God has redeemed their stories and helped them move beyond cultural and gender constraints. With the help of biblical role models and modern-day mentors, these women have discovered how God works through their ethnic identity, freeing them to use their gifts and empowering them to serve and lead.The contributors include writers of East Asian heritage (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) as well as Southeast Asian (Filipina) and South Asian (Pakistani). Their diverse perspectives shed light on common threads in the Asian American experience, providing encouragement and guidance to others on the journey.God has so much more in store for Asian American women than cultural norms, gender roles and old stereotypes of geisha girls or dutiful daughters. Experience the joy and freedom of becoming the Asian American Christian woman God intended you to be.

30 review for More Than Serving Tea: Asian American Women on Expectations, Relationships, Leadership and Faith

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    I was stunned when I realized that I had never read a book by an Asian American Christian Woman Leader, and very few of any combination of the previous words. Most books I read, secular/religious/otherwise, were written by white men. I wonder how this affects my thinking. So, this book was refreshing. If it wasn't so refreshing, I would have rated it with less stars. I was stunned when I realized that I had never read a book by an Asian American Christian Woman Leader, and very few of any combination of the previous words. Most books I read, secular/religious/otherwise, were written by white men. I wonder how this affects my thinking. So, this book was refreshing. If it wasn't so refreshing, I would have rated it with less stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Grace Chen

    My pastor gave me this book, and her being a female pastor in a conservative Chinese church, I think she knows quite a bit about where this book is coming from! It's authored by 5 Asian American women (Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Filipino, and Pakistani) who share their different perspectives and their stories on life, love, faith, leadership, and becoming the Asian American Christian women that God has created them to be. I found myself relating to this book quite a lot, and was surprised at how s My pastor gave me this book, and her being a female pastor in a conservative Chinese church, I think she knows quite a bit about where this book is coming from! It's authored by 5 Asian American women (Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Filipino, and Pakistani) who share their different perspectives and their stories on life, love, faith, leadership, and becoming the Asian American Christian women that God has created them to be. I found myself relating to this book quite a lot, and was surprised at how similar their stories are to mine. It's encouraging and inspiring to see others 'just like me' who have gone several steps ahead and can share from their experience. One suggestion to the editors, if there ever is a reprint, please please please don't insert stories/poems right in the middle of a paragraph or sentence or thought. It's highly distracting!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    Incredible-- only book I've ever seen written by and for Asian American women through the lens of following Jesus. With such humility, it helps us understand ourselves a little better and the issues we deal with everyday, like parent's expectations, society's preconceived notions that we are exposed to, perfectionistic complexes, and hush-hush sexuality. However, it doesn't stop there, this book goes on to encourage us in how to have a voice, to stand up in the person that God created and intend Incredible-- only book I've ever seen written by and for Asian American women through the lens of following Jesus. With such humility, it helps us understand ourselves a little better and the issues we deal with everyday, like parent's expectations, society's preconceived notions that we are exposed to, perfectionistic complexes, and hush-hush sexuality. However, it doesn't stop there, this book goes on to encourage us in how to have a voice, to stand up in the person that God created and intended us to be, and to have a part in this world.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

    Great book detailing the various experiences and struggles of Asian American Christian women with self-identity, expectations, perfectionism, sexuality, and other cultural and social issues. These struggles are connected through faith as these women talk about how God has redeemed or freeed them from cultural expectations and suffering. Very insightful, touching, and easy to relate to.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    touched my heart in a way i didn't anticipate. writing style exceeded my expectations. would recommend especially for asian american women, but also any woman. men might benefit from this book, as well. touched my heart in a way i didn't anticipate. writing style exceeded my expectations. would recommend especially for asian american women, but also any woman. men might benefit from this book, as well.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Interesting to see how other people think.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    So I have definite philosophical issues with this book. Given that it was written in 2006 and has the evangelical Christian worldview embedded throughout explains the differences of opinions. I don’t think that excuses some of the problematic comments, but it does at least give a little light as to why they may have shown up. In 2006 I doubt I would’ve taken issue with any of it. 2018 is a completely different animal. So taking that into consideration and setting it aside overall I found this bo So I have definite philosophical issues with this book. Given that it was written in 2006 and has the evangelical Christian worldview embedded throughout explains the differences of opinions. I don’t think that excuses some of the problematic comments, but it does at least give a little light as to why they may have shown up. In 2006 I doubt I would’ve taken issue with any of it. 2018 is a completely different animal. So taking that into consideration and setting it aside overall I found this book interesting and informative. I appreciated the insight the writers had and the stories from their own lives they shared. I don’t doubt there are other, perhaps less problematic, ways to hear Asian american’s stories still this is worth the read. I would recommend it with the caveat that one needs to go in with both an open and a discerning mind.

  8. 4 out of 5

    CarolAnne

    I find it well written and interesting. I read it for a racial reconciliation course, and while I found that they did a beautiful job communicating the female Asian American perspective, without the male side it feels incomplete. I would love to have a companion collection of perspectives from a group of Asian American men.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jomei

    Intervarsity Press: Vignettes by Christian Asian-American women of Chinese, Korean, Pakistani, Japanese, and Filipina heritages sharing their struggles, successes and advice from their IV careers, families of origin, and everyday life.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Having recently finished Sister Citizen, I was thinking this book would be somewhat similar, but I was disappointed -- there was far less research and far more Christian-ese. Although I did find it valuable to hear the authors' personal stories, there were a lot of vague platitudes to wade through with little practical application -- what exactly does it mean to "come out of the house to Jesus" or "invite God to be your friend"? I also felt that, whereas Harris-Perry in Sister Citizen carefully Having recently finished Sister Citizen, I was thinking this book would be somewhat similar, but I was disappointed -- there was far less research and far more Christian-ese. Although I did find it valuable to hear the authors' personal stories, there were a lot of vague platitudes to wade through with little practical application -- what exactly does it mean to "come out of the house to Jesus" or "invite God to be your friend"? I also felt that, whereas Harris-Perry in Sister Citizen carefully teased out which ideas, self-perceptions, and stereotypes were common to all women and which to black women specifically, the authors continually assume that their own experiences must be unique to Asian American women. In one case, one author assumes that Caucasian women are more confident than Asian women because her one friend seemed more confident than her on one particular occasion, even though she soon after tells the story of someone thinking she was confident when she was still struggling with self-doubt. The editorial decisions were odd at times. Although the authors occasionally draw in voices other than their own to tell stories, they also quote each other as if we don't know that "Kathy, a Korean American women who works at InterVarsity," is coauthor Kathy Khang or "my friend Christie, a Filipina woman" is coauthor Christie Heller de Leon. There are points at which quotes and passages are shared without context, maybe with a source noted with an endnote. And as other reviewers have noted, they put sidebars right in the middle of paragraphs, even in the middle of a word! Overall, while I appreciated the opportunity to hear these women's stories, their perspective was limited (as far as I can tell, they all work together at InterVarsity, through whose press the book was published), their advice was the same fluffy drivel you'd find in any other Christian book, and their conclusions tended to be far-reaching assumptions without any evidence beyond their own experience to back them up. If you're looking for a book that spells out the unique challenges of being an Asian American Christian, skip this one -- it barely scratches the surface.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    I think I would definitely recommend this book to students, but for me I think there were only a couple of chapters that I related to personally (the one on perfectionism and the one on leadership). It was a very easy read, and I really appreciated how the contributing authors were from different Asian backgrounds and walks of life. I also appreciated how each author tied the broken cultural value with the redemption God provides in His Word.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    Connected with a lot of this, also led me to some good reflection and learning of my own with God.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jae-Yong

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela Lee

  15. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jessie T

  17. 5 out of 5

    Devon

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Paw

  20. 5 out of 5

    Esther

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cat

  22. 4 out of 5

    jennifer

  23. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Ting

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marta

  30. 5 out of 5

    Allie

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