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The Legacy Journey: A Radical View of Biblical Wealth and Generosity

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Dave Ramsey shares Biblical wisdom on the legacy we build with our wealth. What does the Bible really say about money? About wealth? How much does God expect you to give to others? How does wealth affect your friendships, marriage, and children? How much is "enough"? There's a lot of bad information in our culture today about wealth--and the wealthy. Worse, there's a growing Dave Ramsey shares Biblical wisdom on the legacy we build with our wealth. What does the Bible really say about money? About wealth? How much does God expect you to give to others? How does wealth affect your friendships, marriage, and children? How much is "enough"? There's a lot of bad information in our culture today about wealth--and the wealthy. Worse, there's a growing backlash in America against our most successful neighbors, but why? To many, wealth is seen as the natural result of hard work and wise money management. To others, wealth is viewed as the ultimate, inexcusable sin. This has left a lot of godly men and women honestly confused about what to do with the resources God's put in their hands. God's ways of handling money caused them to build wealth, but then they're left feeling guilty about it. Is this what God had in mind? In "The Legacy Journey," "New York Times "bestselling author Dave Ramsey takes you deep into God's Word, revealing His perspective on wealth, your personal and family legacy, and how He wants to use you to further His kingdom work around the world. You can truly live--and leave--a legacy. The journey starts today.


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Dave Ramsey shares Biblical wisdom on the legacy we build with our wealth. What does the Bible really say about money? About wealth? How much does God expect you to give to others? How does wealth affect your friendships, marriage, and children? How much is "enough"? There's a lot of bad information in our culture today about wealth--and the wealthy. Worse, there's a growing Dave Ramsey shares Biblical wisdom on the legacy we build with our wealth. What does the Bible really say about money? About wealth? How much does God expect you to give to others? How does wealth affect your friendships, marriage, and children? How much is "enough"? There's a lot of bad information in our culture today about wealth--and the wealthy. Worse, there's a growing backlash in America against our most successful neighbors, but why? To many, wealth is seen as the natural result of hard work and wise money management. To others, wealth is viewed as the ultimate, inexcusable sin. This has left a lot of godly men and women honestly confused about what to do with the resources God's put in their hands. God's ways of handling money caused them to build wealth, but then they're left feeling guilty about it. Is this what God had in mind? In "The Legacy Journey," "New York Times "bestselling author Dave Ramsey takes you deep into God's Word, revealing His perspective on wealth, your personal and family legacy, and how He wants to use you to further His kingdom work around the world. You can truly live--and leave--a legacy. The journey starts today.

30 review for The Legacy Journey: A Radical View of Biblical Wealth and Generosity

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Daws

    It was quite refreshing to read this book on biblical wealth. For anyone familiar with Dave Ramsey's message, you'll read briefly about the baby steps to financial freedom. But this book goes farther by looking at what the Bible really says about building wealth and being generous. Is it okay for some people to earn substantially more than others? Does the Bible say anything about the redistribution of wealth that seems so popular within American culture today? If I'm debt free, can I really enjo It was quite refreshing to read this book on biblical wealth. For anyone familiar with Dave Ramsey's message, you'll read briefly about the baby steps to financial freedom. But this book goes farther by looking at what the Bible really says about building wealth and being generous. Is it okay for some people to earn substantially more than others? Does the Bible say anything about the redistribution of wealth that seems so popular within American culture today? If I'm debt free, can I really enjoy a nice car, or is that being too extravagant? Not only does Mr. Ramsey discuss these kinds of questions within this book, but he talks briefly about the importance of teaching your children how to handle money, and what kinds of decisions you should be considering in estate planning. If you are looking for a practical how-to on money, then I recommend either The Total Money Makeover or the Financial Peace University classes, both also by Dave Ramsey and his team. However, you are working your way through the baby steps Dave recommends and are wondering if it's ever okay to enjoy any of the money God gives to your stewardship, then this is the book to read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paige Rohe

    LOVED. THIS. If you've grown up with toxic messages swirling in your head regarding money, this is the cure. Whether it be from the gnostic-sackcloth-and-ashes vs. health-and-wealth bi-polarism in the church today, or the "buy"-today-pay-tomorrow, payment-plan-all-the-things mindset of the world, this is the solution to clearing the financial stewardship chaos in your world. There are tangible recommendations for growing your money, but the biggest value for this is to really dig into Scripture a LOVED. THIS. If you've grown up with toxic messages swirling in your head regarding money, this is the cure. Whether it be from the gnostic-sackcloth-and-ashes vs. health-and-wealth bi-polarism in the church today, or the "buy"-today-pay-tomorrow, payment-plan-all-the-things mindset of the world, this is the solution to clearing the financial stewardship chaos in your world. There are tangible recommendations for growing your money, but the biggest value for this is to really dig into Scripture and find out what GOD says about money, wealth, stewardship, contentment, generosity, and your legacy. Dave covers all the pitfalls and ditches on BOTH sides of the road and addresses each candidly, clearly, and with his message coming through loud and clear.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alana Treloar

    A well written and articulated book on how we are stewards of Gods money. It also talks about the bibles view building a legacy and leaving a inheritance for your children and their children, something I had never even gave a second thought to.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Winafeld

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In Dave Ramsey's previous books, he tackles the how to get financially fit. In this book The Legacy Journey, he tackles more of the why we should get financially fit. He exposes some myths many Christians carry regarding wealth. Using passages that are normally misinterpreted in the bible, he explains why it's important to build wealth now in order to leave a greater legacy. He also expresses the need for a will, and the importance of selecting the right investments for retirement. This book will he In Dave Ramsey's previous books, he tackles the how to get financially fit. In this book The Legacy Journey, he tackles more of the why we should get financially fit. He exposes some myths many Christians carry regarding wealth. Using passages that are normally misinterpreted in the bible, he explains why it's important to build wealth now in order to leave a greater legacy. He also expresses the need for a will, and the importance of selecting the right investments for retirement. This book will help you create a bigger vision for your finances. I'm currently on baby step two from his previous book, Total Money Makeover but am pumped to push harder in order to advance me on my legacy journey!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Clint WalkingStick ᎤᏓᎸᏄᏍᏘ

    Required reading for anyone in ministry...and since we 19re all in ministry let 19s just call it required reading ;)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kara Larson

    A great follow-up from Financial Peace University for those who are on Baby Steps 4-7 and focused on building wealth and leaving a legacy. I really loved the chapters giving a Biblical view of success/wealth and focus on the goodness of our daily work. The “Baby Steps” of The Legacy Journey: Now: Taking Control—laser focused on taking control of your money and cleaning up a financial mess Then: Getting a Future Focused—adopt a future focus (Baby Step 4 and 5) Us: Creating a Family Legacy—imaging the A great follow-up from Financial Peace University for those who are on Baby Steps 4-7 and focused on building wealth and leaving a legacy. I really loved the chapters giving a Biblical view of success/wealth and focus on the goodness of our daily work. The “Baby Steps” of The Legacy Journey: Now: Taking Control—laser focused on taking control of your money and cleaning up a financial mess Then: Getting a Future Focused—adopt a future focus (Baby Step 4 and 5) Us: Creating a Family Legacy—imaging the future for not just your immediate family by teaching your kids about money but also for future generations. Them: Leaving a Legacy for Others—looking at how God will use you to meet the needs of your community and the world. Chapter 2 The War on Success P. 20 discusses a Jewish view of wealth which is eye-opening. “If there is one Jewish attribute more directly responsible for Jewish success in business than any other, it is this one: Jewish tradition views a person’s quest for profit and wealth to be inherently moral.... Believing that making money is a selfish activity will undermine anyone’s changes of success.” P. 29 “Humility recognizes that God is 100 percent responsible for every blessing, every success, every outcome, and every reward in my life. I only have these things because God gave them to me. Sure, I worked hard but God provided the result. Humility, then, leads to gratitude.” Chapter 3 Snares and Dares P. 41 Martin Luther quote, “I have held many things in my hands, and I have lost them all; but whatever I have placed in God’s hands, that I still possess.” Chapter 4 The Law of Great Gain P. 60 “Contentment is not a lack of ambition or action or intensity. It’s the condition of our hearts while we’re pursing those things. The question shouldn’t be, ‘Is it okay for me to have some nice stuff?’ The real question is, ‘If I don’t have nice stuff, will my spirit be okay with that? Do I have to have this stuff in order to have peace.’” Chapter 5 Your Work Matters P. 87-88 “Success is a journey, not a destination.” “I believe that God has a plan for each and every one of us, and that plan includes a job, a career, a calling to do a specific work while we’re on this earth... That means our work matters to God, and what we do with our days has a huge impact on the legacy we leave behind.” P. 93 A quote from Rabbi Lapin, “Man is most in God’s image when he is creating things.” P. 96 “Get out there and move some things around, and your purpose will find you. It’s called the Butterfly Effect and it means: A little bit of activity today can lead to enormous results later.” P. 99 “Earl Nightingale defined success as “the progressive realization of a worthy ideal,” or goal. Notice that he didn’t say it’s the accomplishment of a goal; it’s the progressive realization—the active of working toward the goal. So when are you a success? You’re a success when you get off the cough, set a good goal, and get to work!” P. 103 I’ve never read Zig Ziglar’s Wheel of Life but like the concept of goals in each of these areas to grow: Family, Spiritual, Physical, Social, Financial, Intellectual, Career Chapter 7 Generational Legacy P. 148 Andy Andrews quote on parenting “‘I’m not that interested in raising great kids. I’m more interested in raising pretty good kids who grow up to be great adults.’ If you’re focused only on having great kids, your parenting style will be all about basic rule following and stiff punishment for going out of bounds. Your kids will be well-mannered and polite, and you may have the picture of a perfect family. At least until they go to college...” P. 160 I love the idea of a family constitution starting with a family mission statement which takes into account your skills/abilities, personality traits, values, dreams and passions. 2. Tailored to your specific family 3. Live it out! 4. Forming a family council to update and enforce the constitution with regular meetings P. 164-165 The idea of a Legacy Box readily accessible for spouse, children, etc in the event of your death: Executive Summary (lists what’s in the box) Legacy Letters (personal letters to each close family member) Birth Certificates SS Cards Passports Marriage Certificate Auto Insurance Homeowner’s/Renter’s Insurance Health Insurance LTD Insurance Long-Term Care Insurance ID Theft Protection Life Insurance Umbrella Liability Insurance Estate Plan Power of Attorneys Wills Funeral Instructions Financial Account Log Safe Deposit Log Monthly Budget Tax Returns Money Market Statements Mutual Fun Statements College Funds Retirement Accounts Rental Property Summary Car Titles Home Ownership Records Passwords/Combinations Chapter 8 Called to Generosity P. 188 Displacement method of generosity “We’re supposed to go into a dark world with our time, talents, and treasure and engage the culture in such a way that we create displacement. And the more of that we do, the cleaner the society becomes. The more we surrender and pull back from that, the more the filth takes over—because one side is going to displace the other.” P. 192 A cake vs candle view of wealth. The cake is finite and will be cut up and eaten away, a candle lights others but doesn’t lose any of it’s light. The Pinnacle Point (this chapter is taken from Ramsey’s Complete Guide to Money) P. 201 “[Investing is] is no about the dollars; it’s about the kind of life you want to live later on. What you do today will determine that.” P. 207 Inflation: he suggests that investments need to make around 6% to stay ahead of inflation. P. 209 He suggests Money Markets are the way to go for savings—specifically the emergency fund so it is liquid while still giving you at least a little return. P. 214 Mutual Fund Diversification Types: growth, growth and income, aggressive growth, and international. P. 219 Ramsey’s tips on rental real estate which should only occur at Baby Step 7 1. Buy Slowly and Pay Cash 2. You Make Your Money at the Buy 3. Pay No More than 70-80% Market Value 4. Only Buy Properties in Your Area The part of the book is a chapter from Jon Acuff’s book Start The Five Lands described for every life as a map to plan out the career side of the legacy journey 1. The Land of Learning—finding your beginning will take time We don’t need to have the finish line in place before we take the first step. “The only line you can control is the starting line; that one is entirely up to you.” 2. The Land of Editing—subtracting distractions, separate the good from the great. 3. The Land of Mastering—Gain lots of experience and be financially smart. The fastest way to become an expert at your new calling is to do so slowly—by acquiring insane amounts of experience. 4. The Land of Harvesting—You’re killing it and making money. But be sure to surround yourself with wise counsel. 5. The Land of Guiding—mentoring others in the way you’ve come. Helps someone else on their own road to awesome. “We shouldn’t settle for ordinary because we don’t serve and ordinary God.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Suzette

    My husband and I have been following Dave Ramsey’s baby steps for over a year now. This book showed us the spiritual purpose behind being responsible with the resources God has given us. With his “now, then, us, them” segments, he shows how our finances are to ultimately be used to care for our families or generations to come and to give generously to others. The legacy is that we are to teach our children about financial responsibility so they can carry on the legacy of generosity.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachelle Cobb

    Everyone should read this book. Like FPU 201. Especially love the chapter about training our children to be good money managers. While I don’t agree with Ramsey about everything, I am shocked at how many takeaways this book gave me (and he uses Scripture solidly, too!). (Relistened.)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Benjyklostermann

    My first Ramsey book. Baby steps, check, no problem. Was hoping for many more concrete ideas on building wealth for a lasting legacy. Over half of this felt like trying to convince himself he isn’t a bad Christian because “the Bible says you have to take care of your family first”.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Darrell Worthy

    I wish Dave Ramsey would cut the jeebus stuff, but what I didn't like about this was his bizarre reinterpretation of Jesus' ascetic denial of material wealth. Dave seems to have some dissonance between his view that people should store up wealth to gain financial freedom (which I more or less agree with) and Jesus' view that you should give it all away. so...he completely reinterprets jesus' view to reduce this dissonance. it ended up being complete bullshit, and I felt sorry for Dave as he trie I wish Dave Ramsey would cut the jeebus stuff, but what I didn't like about this was his bizarre reinterpretation of Jesus' ascetic denial of material wealth. Dave seems to have some dissonance between his view that people should store up wealth to gain financial freedom (which I more or less agree with) and Jesus' view that you should give it all away. so...he completely reinterprets jesus' view to reduce this dissonance. it ended up being complete bullshit, and I felt sorry for Dave as he tried to reconcile his beliefs with the holy book he believes in, and severely floundered.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    If you want to get to the point where your investments provide a higher return then your work start your journey here by reading this. Things my 👂 picked up on...👇 God has been teaching me about money for the last ten years now it's time to teach me about wealth If you are diligent and wise with your income then over time you will become wealthy Where there is no vision, the people perish Proverbs 29:18 I refuse to give ownership of what God's given me to manage Yes he's the true heir to your estat If you want to get to the point where your investments provide a higher return then your work start your journey here by reading this. Things my 👂 picked up on...👇 God has been teaching me about money for the last ten years now it's time to teach me about wealth If you are diligent and wise with your income then over time you will become wealthy Where there is no vision, the people perish Proverbs 29:18 I refuse to give ownership of what God's given me to manage Yes he's the true heir to your estate Service to the market generates wealth, not your inherent value as a human The things that are impossible with man are possible with God Money is like a brick you can use it to build a church or you can through the church window I dare you to build wealth not only so you can build wealth so you can change not only your family tree, but also the whole community The smallest amount can make the biggest difference Man is most in God's image when he is creating things You never know what the final result of any action will be Set goals that leave room for the power of God Everything is created twice, first in the mind, then in reality Setting your mind on something and believing it's not only possible but probable is the key to success Your goals must be your own He who walks with the wise grows wise, but companion of fools suffers harm Proverbs 13:20 Is this a situation God would pour his blessings into? If the answer is yes, then maybe it's something he wants you to do with his money Get some money and multiply it like I did Your only limit is you Peron ally I think most of your excuses are garbage God everything that we ever have comes straight from your hand The reason the poor are poor are not because the rich are rich I want to get to the point where my investments provide a higher return then my work Don't bet the family farm on one race horse Money is a renewable resource They call me bill gates, they know the money's real Most people's success rise out of the ashes of their previous failures What can I do today that will get me closer to where you are in your business and in your wealth building? Give it to God...It's a blessing he will carry it We love to match good people to good homes Help someone else on their own road to awesome Take a look at the offer, if it's not right, don't sign the deal

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stewart

    Finally, a well-written book about money. The most interesting thing about this book is it is from a perspective of religious views on wealth building. Which forced me outside of my perspective because I have never viewed wealth building this way. It takes Jewish and Christian views/metaphors and breaks down guidelines set in those traditions and religious texts on the responsibility of managing money for your family, and then for your community. It lays out the argument that if you are to be a Finally, a well-written book about money. The most interesting thing about this book is it is from a perspective of religious views on wealth building. Which forced me outside of my perspective because I have never viewed wealth building this way. It takes Jewish and Christian views/metaphors and breaks down guidelines set in those traditions and religious texts on the responsibility of managing money for your family, and then for your community. It lays out the argument that if you are to be a steward of money, it's up to you as the manager of the wealth to ensure the money goes where it needs to go. You wouldn't give money to your cousin to manage your retirement, so if you've earned wealth through honest means and sacrifice, then it's up to you to manage it for your family to ensure a lasting legacy of outrageous, generous giving for the benefit of your community and those in need. Favorite metaphor on contentment with what you have and how to ratio what's left to help others: "It's an acient Jewish ceremony called the Havdalah, and Rabbi Lapin explains it this way: Jewish tradition strongly establishes the principle that each person makes his or her own needs the primary concern, although not the only concern. One could say that Judaism declares it necessary but insufficient to focus on one's own needs first. As the Sabbath ebbs away each Saturday night, Jewish families prepare for the productive work week ahead by singing the joyful Havdalah service...The Havdalah service is recited over a cup of wine that runs over into the saucer beneath. This overflowing cup symbolizes the intention to produce during the week ahead not only sufficient to fill one's own cup, but also an excess that will allow overflow for the benefit of others. In other words, I am obliged to fill my cup, and then continue pouring as it were so that I will have sufficient to give away to others. So you fill your own cup first, which symoblizes taking care of your own household first. That's what "enough" is for your family-whatever it takes to fill that cup. And then you keep pouring so you have plenty to give to others" (pages 65-66).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mike Nguyen

    This is the second book I read from Dave Ramsey. The first one was Total Money Maker Over last couple of months. I was inspired by his authentic approaches to wealth: an enduring processes with strong principle and discipline, and most importantly, it could be done by anyone regardless of income. Key concept is cutting operating / expense cost, reduce debt by all cost, save money for big opportunities (will come when you have spare money for investment). I liked the two account concept: operatin This is the second book I read from Dave Ramsey. The first one was Total Money Maker Over last couple of months. I was inspired by his authentic approaches to wealth: an enduring processes with strong principle and discipline, and most importantly, it could be done by anyone regardless of income. Key concept is cutting operating / expense cost, reduce debt by all cost, save money for big opportunities (will come when you have spare money for investment). I liked the two account concept: operating and saving (which the saving has no ATM can't be withdraw) and monthly budgeting which I am still struggling to deal with it. This book brought another higher level perspective which is used to justify how we shall manage our wealth. Important concept i learnt was making proportional percentage of wealth in all aspect of live including spending, investing, saving, and giving (not giving back just giving with intention). Be fully responsible with your life, family and the people you love (developed a will regardless of your position). Wealth legacy must be transferable from generation to generation, teach your children and grandchildren to manage them wealth. avoid the lottery concept that may destroy not just wealth but other people life. Even for giving, do it like an investment by selecting the right non-profit organisation with track record of doing the job well and work with them closely. There are much more things I learnt but still yet to rationalize it as may be I am not there yet. Hence will definitely I plan to re-read this book for future learning and applying of these principles.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth (Liz)

    Excellent! I am thankful and inspired to be on this journey but I am specially thankful to have someone who has already been on this journey shedding light on next steps. Living in a world with so many needs and so few helpers, it is easy to forget that the responsibility of the world belongs to the God, and am not Him. I myself had this moment a while back regarding giving time, and helping others emotionally ("go where you are called" If you do, God will prompt others to God where you are not; Excellent! I am thankful and inspired to be on this journey but I am specially thankful to have someone who has already been on this journey shedding light on next steps. Living in a world with so many needs and so few helpers, it is easy to forget that the responsibility of the world belongs to the God, and am not Him. I myself had this moment a while back regarding giving time, and helping others emotionally ("go where you are called" If you do, God will prompt others to God where you are not; but if you do your own thing, you are getting in the way of God's plan for you and others, occupying room where someone perhaps more capable could do better) Now it is time to face it fiscally! I didn't realize I had already been experiencing some of the guilt the book describes, thinking: how many could I provide for if only I didn't... If I kept myself on a shoestring budget. I love that Dave reminds us that God entrusted us with the responsibility of managing this blessing. God made provision through establishing the tithe and through the promptings of the Holy Spirit for where we are to give out of the abundance God provides; and if we are walking closely with Him, we will know which part is our responsibility and which one isn't. I continue to pray that my heart will be tender to Him, that I will be an excellent manager of His resources so that He may use my hands to bring forth his full plan in and through my life. I heard someone say once, one day I will have to give account for what I did with what he gave me, I hope that day I can tell him, I have nothing left, I used it and gave it all for you in my lifetime. That to me would be a great legacy and a life well lived!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    I've read several of Dave Ramsey's books, and I finally learned a few new things with this one. There are too many people out there who think they have a say in how much you earn and how you should spend it. In "The Legacy Journey", Ramsey encourages the reader not to be ashamed of being successful and explains how wealth is a responsibility rather than a privilege. I also enjoyed reading the extra chapters at the end where he elaborates on some of the missing pieces from his previous books and g I've read several of Dave Ramsey's books, and I finally learned a few new things with this one. There are too many people out there who think they have a say in how much you earn and how you should spend it. In "The Legacy Journey", Ramsey encourages the reader not to be ashamed of being successful and explains how wealth is a responsibility rather than a privilege. I also enjoyed reading the extra chapters at the end where he elaborates on some of the missing pieces from his previous books and goes a little more in detail about investing. He often gets slammed for quoting a 12% average return (I've seen just over 11%, but it's probably safer to assume 8-9% in your projection calculations) as well as his high risk, and heavily feed mutual fund recommendations. In the first bonus chapter, he touches a bit more on that aspect of investing, and I don't blame him for not elaborating more in "Financial Peace" and "The Total Money Makover". If you're reading those books, you're most likely not ready to get into investing anyway. I'm just glad that his publishing schedule is a few steps ahead of my financial needs so that I have access to the necessary resources when I arrive at those milestones. The second bonus chapter is from the book "Start" by Jon Acuff. It's a 5-6 page excerpt that possibly has relevance to some readers, so it's a good fit, though you could probably skip it if you aren't looking to make a change in your career or have already read Acuff's book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shorel

    Is wealth biblically bad? If not, how do we become good stewards so that it doesn't destroy us or our children? If you plan on living debt-free and eventually having financial wealth built up, this book is a critical read. --- Proverbs 22.17,18 says that if you incline your ear to God's words, and apply your heart to His knowledge [which comes from His words], you will have pleasure if you keep them in you and if they are ready on your lips. In other words, if you observe and apply God's commands, Is wealth biblically bad? If not, how do we become good stewards so that it doesn't destroy us or our children? If you plan on living debt-free and eventually having financial wealth built up, this book is a critical read. --- Proverbs 22.17,18 says that if you incline your ear to God's words, and apply your heart to His knowledge [which comes from His words], you will have pleasure if you keep them in you and if they are ready on your lips. In other words, if you observe and apply God's commands, things will go well with you. So, if you have already read The Total Money Makeover or taken Financial Peace University then you know that God has given ways to be out of debt, take care of your family and build wealth so you can give generously. This book deals with that last part: Building wealth and giving generously. But first Mr.Ramsey deals with false paradigms that are unfortunately rather prevalent in society. False ideas like: - Wealth is bad. [aka. "If you have something nicer than me, you have too much."] - Money is the root of all evil. [psst. The bible actually says the LOVE of money is the root of all kinds of evil. In other words, worshipping something other than God.] - Being poor is to be more holy. [The "Widow's mite" is an example of what Jesus was saying a couple verses before of the religious authorities devouring widows houses. The Rich Young Ruler is illustrating salvation not being based on works. By the way, if salvation or holiness were based on works, don't you think Jesus would have said the Widow above did good? He didn't...read it again.] - Profit is immoral. [PSST!!! Read Proverbs 31.] - and so on.... Basically, by the end of the first few chapters you should understand that holiness isn't based on the amount of financial resources you have. The question that should be asked is: Are you being a faithful steward of God's resources? [PSST!!! It's not your money. It's not your house. Not your car. Not your family. It's all GOD's!] Now that we've established that...how are we to be a good steward. Mr.Ramsey follows the formula of NOW-THEN-US-THEM [BLOCKQUOTE]Leaving a Legacy for Others As you get to the end of the legacy journey framework, you know that the bills are paid—that’s NOW. You know that you’re going to be able to retire with dignity and send your kids to college—that’s THEN. You know that you are taking steps to prepare the next generation to carry your new family legacy forward—that’s US. And then, finally, you see the big picture—the THEM. The THEM stage represents all the needs in your community and around the world, and you begin to see how God can use you to meet some of those needs. Your vision expands and you start to see the world through Christ’s eyes. Suddenly you see wells that need to be drilled in Haiti. You see the HIV prevention efforts in Africa. You see mosquito nets that can be used to prevent malaria. You see the hungry children right down the street. You see the broke, scared single mom at the other end of the pew who can’t pay the light bill this week—and who might need a reliable car too. At this stage, you’re able to open your eyes and see—maybe for the first time—how you can make a difference in the world. Proverbs says, “He who gives to the poor will not lack, but he who hides his eyes will have many curses” (28:27). I don’t think most of us ever actually hide our eyes; I just think the pressures we’re under keep our heads down so we can’t see. But as we work through these biblical principles about taking care of our family first, casting a vision for the future, and leaving an inheritance to our children’s children, we’re able to lift our heads and look clearly into the future. God can do amazing things through us in that future. But we have to take it one step at a time, first through NOW, then THEN, then US, and finally to THEM. And that’s where we get to help change the world. That’s a powerful legacy.[/blockquote] That's what I enjoyed most about this book. Not just techniques for being wise with your money. But having money doesn't make you wise. (Think of all the examples of sudden wealth squandered; lottery winners, NFL players, etc.) If you are wise with your money, you will be the manager of God's wealth. How do you prepare yourself and your children to manage God's wealth well? That's a primary question the book deals with. If you are a wise steward with your money, but haven't taught your children to be wise stewards...if you leave the inheritance to them, it will destroy them. This book explains how to prepare them (or prepare your estate so it doesn't destroy them). An aside: the wealth doesn't need to be completely donated to a charity at your death. Why give it all to a charity who may/may not manage it well, when you have already prepared and worked with your children who have been trained as good stewards? The last part THEM, talks about giving generously, but giving wisely. To research giving opportunities as much or more than you would research investing in a mutual fund or buying real estate. Because sudden wealth can just as easily destroy a small non-profit who doesn't steward well. Finally, Mr.Ramsey explains in many chapters that you need to prepare your heart and live a legacy of generosity, pouring into people and having healthy relationships with spouse and children. Otherwise, wealth will only magnify your problems. Like stomping on the gas while the car is in reverse. Stomping on the gas only accelerated you in the wrong direction. Wealth will only accelerate you towards divorce, make you a more hateful person, make you more ungenerous. Make sure you are healthy with God and relationships...before you get any money built up. Pray God helps you, so that it will be a blessing as it is intended to be with all those around you and around the world. Be a good and faithful steward of GOD's (it's not yours) money.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Klistiny Williams

    I have been listening to Dave Ramsey for over 2 years now. (His youtube channel popped up in my feed after watching videos from Gateway Church led by Robert Morris. Robert Morris wrote The Blessed Life, and I was pleasantly surprised by his teachings on money and how we are to be blessings to others.) I have never read the Total Money Makeover and likely never will. It took approximately 3 weeks for me to pay off what little debt I had and continue on the Baby Steps, even though I had just learn I have been listening to Dave Ramsey for over 2 years now. (His youtube channel popped up in my feed after watching videos from Gateway Church led by Robert Morris. Robert Morris wrote The Blessed Life, and I was pleasantly surprised by his teachings on money and how we are to be blessings to others.) I have never read the Total Money Makeover and likely never will. It took approximately 3 weeks for me to pay off what little debt I had and continue on the Baby Steps, even though I had just learned what they are. Mr. Ramsey does a very good job covering the contents of his book through his radio show. However, he has mentioned his book the Legacy Journey enough times that it got me curious. Legacy is something I've never given a lot of thought to, and I have been away from church for many years. I finally broke down and bought a copy and read it in less than 2 days. It was everything I thought it would be. My finances have been well under control for a while now, but I am struggling in my career. The Legacy Journey is another angle I am viewing for my life. It is something I am considering as I decide what to do next in my life and career.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Schmid

    Listened to the audiobook. Dave Ramey gives some good and sound principles and advice for managing your personal finances. He rightly distances himself from the prosperity gospel and I would not put him in that category either, but the focus of the book seemed to me to be much more on getting rich yourself and making your family rich than on being generous. He gives the picture of filling your own cup until it is overflowing to show that only what is overflowing is meant for giving to others. Wh Listened to the audiobook. Dave Ramey gives some good and sound principles and advice for managing your personal finances. He rightly distances himself from the prosperity gospel and I would not put him in that category either, but the focus of the book seemed to me to be much more on getting rich yourself and making your family rich than on being generous. He gives the picture of filling your own cup until it is overflowing to show that only what is overflowing is meant for giving to others. While he believes in tithing, it seems that anything beyond 10% is absolutley a no-go until you have made sure that your retirement is completely funded, the college education for your children is completely funded, you have a good inheritance in place for your children and children's children and so on... I do agree and value many of the principles he gives (although not necessarily the specific detailed instructions), and it is very important and good to take care of your own family/children, but believe the focus is too much on personal and family wealth building than on generosity.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Charly Troff (ReaderTurnedWriter)

    This was reread for me, but I thoroughly enjoyed the book (both times). In contrast to his other books, which are more focused on how to get out of debt and the importance of using a common sense, debt free approach to finances, this book focuses more on baby step seven and building wealth. In the book, Dave Ramsey talks a lot about how it's okay, once you have wealth, to enjoy some of it. Our society looks down on the wealthy and wealth in general, but it's actually a good thing to enjoy the ha This was reread for me, but I thoroughly enjoyed the book (both times). In contrast to his other books, which are more focused on how to get out of debt and the importance of using a common sense, debt free approach to finances, this book focuses more on baby step seven and building wealth. In the book, Dave Ramsey talks a lot about how it's okay, once you have wealth, to enjoy some of it. Our society looks down on the wealthy and wealth in general, but it's actually a good thing to enjoy the hard work and sacrifice it took to get to where you are. The key is to have a balance between spending, giving, and investing. I love this book, but I love everything by Dave Ramsey. If you are headed toward the wealth-building part of your life, I would definitely recommend this book (if you want to be but aren't quite there yet, I definitely recommend his book The Total Money Makeover or his FPU course).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    I was hoping for more detailed book in the leaving a Legacy. I also think he is taking some political views on wealth and distribution and not only hearing the extreme viewpoints not the more moderate side, especially that of corporations to belittle his relative for complaining about corporations. There are obvious situations where corporations have taken advantage or outright screwed over people examples being some life saving drug prices such as insulin etc.. The banks that got bailed out by I was hoping for more detailed book in the leaving a Legacy. I also think he is taking some political views on wealth and distribution and not only hearing the extreme viewpoints not the more moderate side, especially that of corporations to belittle his relative for complaining about corporations. There are obvious situations where corporations have taken advantage or outright screwed over people examples being some life saving drug prices such as insulin etc.. The banks that got bailed out by the people, and as long as there is lobbyist filtering money to politicians then the system is broke, that is just like those wealthy actors who bribed to get gets in Universities. I did like Dave's overall messages about giving and leaving a legacy but think he comes across cocky and not understanding some points he discussed.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I'm fully invested in the Dave Ramsey system/philosophy, so I was curious to see what he added to that system/philosophy in his latest book The Legacy Journey. Although I enjoyed the book and it fully aligned with said philosophy, I felt it was a bit redundant, both within the book itself and compared to his other books. However, if you were reading this on its own, or not as fully invested in DR, I think it would be 5 stars. I did appreciate the two bonus chapters at the end. One was on how he i I'm fully invested in the Dave Ramsey system/philosophy, so I was curious to see what he added to that system/philosophy in his latest book The Legacy Journey. Although I enjoyed the book and it fully aligned with said philosophy, I felt it was a bit redundant, both within the book itself and compared to his other books. However, if you were reading this on its own, or not as fully invested in DR, I think it would be 5 stars. I did appreciate the two bonus chapters at the end. One was on how he invests his money, and the other was on finding your passion. I kind of wish there was more of that in this book. It would have rounded it out more and made it less of a rant. All in all, decent book, but wish it had gone more in depth with the bonus material.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Smith Cutts

    Consistent with Dave Ramsey’s previous teachings in Total Money Makeover and Financial Peace, Dave moves on to cover what to do in Baby Step 7, or “living like no one else.” Unfortunately, he spends 1/2 the book defending wealth that it didn’t leave much left for actual guidance on setting up charitable donations, foundations, elaborating between trusts, etc or discussing various ways to leave wealth to family and charities so that it is protected but also does the most good. The chapters on tha Consistent with Dave Ramsey’s previous teachings in Total Money Makeover and Financial Peace, Dave moves on to cover what to do in Baby Step 7, or “living like no one else.” Unfortunately, he spends 1/2 the book defending wealth that it didn’t leave much left for actual guidance on setting up charitable donations, foundations, elaborating between trusts, etc or discussing various ways to leave wealth to family and charities so that it is protected but also does the most good. The chapters on that I found to be very surface-level. While I would always consult with an estate attorney and accountant, some practical advice and scenarios would have been helpful.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John

    This book is essentially written for people who are advanced down the path of the seven Baby Steps. Dave talks a lot about how to handle wealth, especially with regard to transferring it generationally. He offers a lot of great points in this book, and doesn’t get too much into the technical aspects of wealth-building. However, one of the final chapters is an excerpt from another of his books, and he does talk about some of the nuts and bolts of building wealth, once you’re already in the later This book is essentially written for people who are advanced down the path of the seven Baby Steps. Dave talks a lot about how to handle wealth, especially with regard to transferring it generationally. He offers a lot of great points in this book, and doesn’t get too much into the technical aspects of wealth-building. However, one of the final chapters is an excerpt from another of his books, and he does talk about some of the nuts and bolts of building wealth, once you’re already in the later Baby Steps. If you’re just getting started in the Baby Steps, this book is likely too far down the line for you to be able to relate.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kitty

    This book was absolutely imperative to rounding out Dave Ramsey's financial advice for those looking to become debt free and what to do after that happens. We found ourselves in the wonderful position of recently becoming debt free fair and our family had a "umm...what now?" moment. This help give direction for the next steps in life with plenty of flexibility to create your unique legacy. I enjoyed this book more than any other from the Ramsey book family. Less structure, but at this point in y This book was absolutely imperative to rounding out Dave Ramsey's financial advice for those looking to become debt free and what to do after that happens. We found ourselves in the wonderful position of recently becoming debt free fair and our family had a "umm...what now?" moment. This help give direction for the next steps in life with plenty of flexibility to create your unique legacy. I enjoyed this book more than any other from the Ramsey book family. Less structure, but at this point in your financial journey it becomes very personal and less of a clear cut path for becoming debt free.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    “...be intentional about protecting your marriage, teaching your kids about money, giving generously, managing your wealth using ratios, and maintaining healthy relationships, then you’ll leave not only a powerful, enduring financial legacy, but also a legacy of love and respect that will last several generations.” All the above can be accomplished whether you are a Christian or not. Dave Ramsey’s principles work for everyone. His baby steps work for everyone. This book is a good read for everyone “...be intentional about protecting your marriage, teaching your kids about money, giving generously, managing your wealth using ratios, and maintaining healthy relationships, then you’ll leave not only a powerful, enduring financial legacy, but also a legacy of love and respect that will last several generations.” All the above can be accomplished whether you are a Christian or not. Dave Ramsey’s principles work for everyone. His baby steps work for everyone. This book is a good read for everyone.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ben Cooper

    This is a great resource to use to get you into and through retirement years. It will help you "live like no one else, so that later you can Give like no one else". I used it as a text to teach an adult Sunday School class. The book has a lot of scripture to back up the principles that Dave Ramsey teaches. Husbands and wives should read through this book together to get on the same page with their finances. Planning for your later years and where you want your money to go is very important. Take This is a great resource to use to get you into and through retirement years. It will help you "live like no one else, so that later you can Give like no one else". I used it as a text to teach an adult Sunday School class. The book has a lot of scripture to back up the principles that Dave Ramsey teaches. Husbands and wives should read through this book together to get on the same page with their finances. Planning for your later years and where you want your money to go is very important. Take the forward thinking journey to see what is possible. I'm living the dream!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    I can’t say enough about this book. I’m a HUGE Dave Ramsey fan, but to be honest, I’ve put off reading this as I thought he’d sold out a bit by writing it (or was at least getting a little bit low on new material). I quote EntreLeadership just about every day and now I have quotes from here that trump those. If I had to sum up my feelings I’d say this: life changing. Period. It has changed mine for the better. Thank you, Dave, AGAIN for helping me. Love it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    I loved this book. This was the first Dave Ramsey book that I have read and I think he did an amazing job with it. It is well written and so easy to follow all of what he is trying to instill in people. In my life, I am straddling the life stages that Dave calls Now and Then and I think it was the perfect time to read this book. There is so much relevant information and I feel very inspired after reading this one.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katelyn

    This book is a fantastic follow-up to Dave Ramsey’s baby steps. I have struggled with Dave Ramsey’s approach, because I don’t have credit card debt. This book gives a more advanced approach to managing money. I still have student loans, but his perspective in this book was helpful as I start to have more disposable income. I got this book from the library, but want to buy my own copy so that I can refer to it in the future.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    In his familiar, common-sense style, Dave Ramsey breaks down the “what next?” After his famous baby steps. His explanation of how to handle wealth and our responsibility with it is one of the most Biblical and easiest to understand I’ve ever read. This is a much needed book in our world today, particularly in our church world. I highly recommend this to anyone serious about managing money, even wealth, God’s way and for His glory.

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