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Sunny Randall, the Boston P.I. with a personal life as tangled as that of her clients, is hired on as a bodyguard to an up-and-coming starlet, and discovers some ugly truths behind her glossy façade. Buddy Bollen is a C-list movie mogul who made his fortune producing films of questionable artistic merit. When Buddy hires Sunny Randall to protect his rising star and girlfrie Sunny Randall, the Boston P.I. with a personal life as tangled as that of her clients, is hired on as a bodyguard to an up-and-coming starlet, and discovers some ugly truths behind her glossy façade. Buddy Bollen is a C-list movie mogul who made his fortune producing films of questionable artistic merit. When Buddy hires Sunny Randall to protect his rising star and girlfriend, Erin Flint, Sunny knows from the start that the prickly, spoiled beauty won't make her job easy. And when Erin's sister, Misty, is found dead in the lavish home they share with sugar daddy Bollen, there doesn't seem to be a single lead worth pursuing. But then Sunny meets Jesse Stone, chief of police in Paradise, Massachusetts, under whose jurisdiction the case falls. Tracking Misty's murderer reveals a host of seedy complications behind Erin's glamorous lifestyle as well as Buddy Bollen's entertainment empire, made up of shady film deals and mobsters out for revenge. But in a world where there's little difference between the good guys and the bad, exposing the killer could prove to be Sunny's undoing.


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Sunny Randall, the Boston P.I. with a personal life as tangled as that of her clients, is hired on as a bodyguard to an up-and-coming starlet, and discovers some ugly truths behind her glossy façade. Buddy Bollen is a C-list movie mogul who made his fortune producing films of questionable artistic merit. When Buddy hires Sunny Randall to protect his rising star and girlfrie Sunny Randall, the Boston P.I. with a personal life as tangled as that of her clients, is hired on as a bodyguard to an up-and-coming starlet, and discovers some ugly truths behind her glossy façade. Buddy Bollen is a C-list movie mogul who made his fortune producing films of questionable artistic merit. When Buddy hires Sunny Randall to protect his rising star and girlfriend, Erin Flint, Sunny knows from the start that the prickly, spoiled beauty won't make her job easy. And when Erin's sister, Misty, is found dead in the lavish home they share with sugar daddy Bollen, there doesn't seem to be a single lead worth pursuing. But then Sunny meets Jesse Stone, chief of police in Paradise, Massachusetts, under whose jurisdiction the case falls. Tracking Misty's murderer reveals a host of seedy complications behind Erin's glamorous lifestyle as well as Buddy Bollen's entertainment empire, made up of shady film deals and mobsters out for revenge. But in a world where there's little difference between the good guys and the bad, exposing the killer could prove to be Sunny's undoing.

30 review for Blue Screen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    This is the second runny Sandall Sunny Randall novel I've read and probably my favourite Parker novel to-date, despite all the weird let's cross over characters from all my series stuff that's going on. (Sunny gets the main protagonist of one series for a boy friend and already has the girl friend of the main protagonist from another series for a therapist.) In fact I like Sunny and her boy friend more than I like Spenser and his girlfriend, despite the Spenser novels being far more famous than This is the second runny Sandall Sunny Randall novel I've read and probably my favourite Parker novel to-date, despite all the weird let's cross over characters from all my series stuff that's going on. (Sunny gets the main protagonist of one series for a boy friend and already has the girl friend of the main protagonist from another series for a therapist.) In fact I like Sunny and her boy friend more than I like Spenser and his girlfriend, despite the Spenser novels being far more famous than any of Parker's other series. Susan Silverman, Wunder-therapist, cures all Randall's man-issues with the twitch of an eyebrow, which is really annoying because that never happens back in reality and yet a very realistic approach is taken to the rest of the story, so it feels glaringly out of place. One reason why I prefer this series to the Spenser books I've read is that there is much less macho posturing, because Randall isn't an exceptionally macho woman. Macho posturing, even if it is entirely appropriate to the characters and situation can irritate me if there is too much in too short a time. In my review of Melancholy Baby I was a little negative about Spike, the gay tough-guy friend. However, that is somewhat unfair in that gay characters appear in Parker's books where-as they are conspicuous by their absence in most novels. Parker's gay characters aren't mere stereotypes, either, even if they do suffer from character-recycling with only minor variations - which is true of Parker's straight characters, too. One of the best Parker books I've read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott A. Miller

    Parker put Sunny Randall and Jesse Stone together in this one and it was great. The Bad Guys weren’t easy to pick out until the end. Very nice little mystery.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bing Gordon

    Love in Paradise Sunny, meet Jesse. Sunny, meet Susan. Jesse, meet Spike. So very satisfying when loose ends connect. Like a fairy tale, with ogres, trolls and grisly outcomes. I just wish there were many happy returns. Oh, and that the female movie star could hit major league fast balls.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I am loving this series and Sunny Randal. Sunny Randal, investigator extraordinaire, is hired as a bodyguard by Buddy Bollen to protect his pet star and lover, Erin Flint, principal of several of his B-movies. Buddy is what could be called a sugar daddy and obsessed with Erin. And it looks like he’s pinning his financial future on continuing to produce her movies. He also has what looks like a very flawed plan to incorporate her into his major league baseball team, maybe as a publicity stunt, bu I am loving this series and Sunny Randal. Sunny Randal, investigator extraordinaire, is hired as a bodyguard by Buddy Bollen to protect his pet star and lover, Erin Flint, principal of several of his B-movies. Buddy is what could be called a sugar daddy and obsessed with Erin. And it looks like he’s pinning his financial future on continuing to produce her movies. He also has what looks like a very flawed plan to incorporate her into his major league baseball team, maybe as a publicity stunt, but doomed to fail. But Sunny’s not convinced of her talent as an actress, however she is a gifted athlete and has an amazing body, featured prominently in her movies. Sunny finds her self-centred and spoiled, in fact, downright mean and egocentric. While she’s is trying to warm up to and understand Erin, there’s a murder at the compound Buddy, Erin and their entourage reside. Erin’s personal trainer is found dead, without a clue as to who or how someone could have gotten in. Sunny discovers that the personal trainer, Misty was Erin’s sister, now why was that a secret? Erin hires Sunny to investigate the murder of her sister. Buddy Bollen’s connections to organized crime become clearer as they investigate the backing deals made with real hoodlums. The location of the murder is Paradise, MA which is served by Jesse Stone, Chief of Police. Jesse and Sunny hit it off instantly so they team up to search for the killer. There is definitely electricity between these two as they both experience a certain degree of confusion and ex-spousal regret. Looking forward to the next one, I love these two together.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This is part of Robert B Parker's Sunny Randall series, set in Boston. The action starts when a sleazy, B grade movie mogul hires her as a body guard for his top celebrity/ girlfriend who is also training to become a Major League Baseball player for the team he owns, the Connecticut Nutmegs. His strategy is the publicity will work to promote her new movie and prop up his struggling ball franchise. When her personal assistant turns up dead and is revealed to be her sister, Sunny joins forces with This is part of Robert B Parker's Sunny Randall series, set in Boston. The action starts when a sleazy, B grade movie mogul hires her as a body guard for his top celebrity/ girlfriend who is also training to become a Major League Baseball player for the team he owns, the Connecticut Nutmegs. His strategy is the publicity will work to promote her new movie and prop up his struggling ball franchise. When her personal assistant turns up dead and is revealed to be her sister, Sunny joins forces with the local police chief, Jesse Stone. Their relationship becomes romantic, which is problematic for them both. If you are a fan of Parker's Spencer series, you will recognize the wit and hard-boiled detective speech.

  6. 5 out of 5

    John Olson

    Sunny Randall, Jesse Stone, Suitcase Simpson, Captain Healey, the shrinks! All of great characters. Be a good Hallmark movie cleaned up of course but none the less I think it would work. But then again I’m not a movie mogul!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Debra B

    3 1/2 rounded up to 4.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    First Jesse Stone that had s (pretty) happy ending, good plot. Sex - lots¡ Use fast fwd. Well narrated.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Megargee

    Having read most of the late Robert B. Parker's crime novels, it was a pleasant surprise to find one I had not previously encountered. The 5th of the 6 Sunny Randall series, this 2006 crossover features both Sunny, the female Boston Private I. whose father is a retired police detective, and Jesse Stone, the Chief of Police in Paradise, MA who formerly worked homicide in LA until he was fired for drinking on duty. There is even a cameo appearance by Susan Silverman from the Spenser series. (Appa Having read most of the late Robert B. Parker's crime novels, it was a pleasant surprise to find one I had not previously encountered. The 5th of the 6 Sunny Randall series, this 2006 crossover features both Sunny, the female Boston Private I. whose father is a retired police detective, and Jesse Stone, the Chief of Police in Paradise, MA who formerly worked homicide in LA until he was fired for drinking on duty. There is even a cameo appearance by Susan Silverman from the Spenser series. (Apparently Parker could not figure a way to include Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch from his Western series.) While there is a crime story.... Sunny is hired by a sleazy movie producer to protect his femme fatale star who is being groomed to be the first female MLB player only to have the star's assistant killed in, you guessed it, Paradise, MA.... the main thrust of the story is the developing relationship between Sunny and Jesse, both of whom are dealing with the aftermaths of their respective divorces. While Sunny shares custody of Rosie, their bull terrier, with her ex husband, she is unexpectedly shaken by his remarriage while Jesse's ex, the TV weather girl who followed him from LA, has once again found it necessary to canoodle her producer. The crime takes a back seat while Sunny and Jesse cautiously get it on. The romantic scenes, told from Sunny's POV, are humorous as well as sensual, especially the encounter in the dressing room of a high end boutique on Rodeo Drive (where I once had a run in with Zsa Zsa Gabor and her dog, but that is another story.) Overall a fun read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David

    As a kid, I loved Cross-Over comic stories. You know-- Superman teams up with Batman, or Spiderman fights the Incredible Hulk-- stuff like that. I used to imagine a television episode where the Cartwrights from Bonanza fought a range war against the Barkley's from the Big Valley. Or, what if Paladin and the Rifleman teamed up to clean up North Fork? Blue Screen is a cross-over story. Two of Parker's leading characters, Sunny Randall, private investigator with her bull terrier, and Jesse Stone, sof As a kid, I loved Cross-Over comic stories. You know-- Superman teams up with Batman, or Spiderman fights the Incredible Hulk-- stuff like that. I used to imagine a television episode where the Cartwrights from Bonanza fought a range war against the Barkley's from the Big Valley. Or, what if Paladin and the Rifleman teamed up to clean up North Fork? Blue Screen is a cross-over story. Two of Parker's leading characters, Sunny Randall, private investigator with her bull terrier, and Jesse Stone, soft spoken serious police chief of small Massachussetts town. Sunny is hired to protect movie star, Erin, a gorgeous babe with natural beauty and practically no acting talent. Soon, Erin's personal assistant is murdered and Sunny is asked to find out who did it. Because the crime occurs in Stone's jurisdiction the two champions of justice began to pursue Erin's past and uncover (as usual) a boatload of filth that might be connected to the murder. I have to say that Sunny Randall is almost a female mirror-image of Parker's most popular hero, Spenser, who is often for hire! She's tough, wise-cracking, and stubborn. Parker manages to give her an odd dog and a different background than Spenser, but take away the dog and the divorce and put a dress on Robert Urich (who played Spenser in the television series, and yes, I know he is deceased) he could play Sunny with very little effort. She is much too much like Spenser. However, I like the Jesse Stone character. He, unlike Sunny and Spenser, often holds his tongue. When he does speak, it is with provoking questions. Occasionally, he uses his office to verbally bludgeon someone into place with warnings and not-so-veiled threats like "You should stop or I might have to physically restrain you for the public safety and you might lose some teeth." The fact that Stone has a serious character flaw, an alcohol problem, makes him very real. However, it seems odd that Parker's characters all seem to need some psychological help. The style is typical Parker. He writes crisp, short, chapters that make the reader read "just one more." He invents situations that are interesting and backgrounds that are ominous. However, this time around, even Jesse Stone can't keep this novel afloat. His sexual liasons with Sunny and their growing relationship become the focus of the story, which flaws this novel greatly. Instead of being a great mystery-- it just becomes about their own character flaws. While my reviews often gripe about a lack of characterization, in this case Parker goes too far with romance and not far enough with a good story. The conclusion and resolution left me angry at what I consider to be a HUGE hole in the plot. Not wanting to write spoiler-- I'll let that be nuff said... I will continue to read Parker from time to time-- as I am constantly running into cheap copies of his books at local library sales, etc. However, I consider his material, for me, at least, to be nothing more but "filler" material. Something to fill time that is fairly enjoyable, but that I don't expect to be great stuff.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jerry B

    So “Blue” is apparently the first meeting of our heroine Sunny Randall, feisty and attractive Boston PI, and Jesse Stone, Parker’s Chief of Police of Paradise, Mass. (They reunite later in “Split Image.”) Sunny is hired to be a bodyguard for Erin Flint, both the gorgeous actress star of “Warrior” movies, and an aspiring major league baseball player. Soon thereafter, Erin’s Personal Assistant Misty is murdered, and Erin wants Sunny to work on that, the death occurring in Stone’s jurisdiction. And So “Blue” is apparently the first meeting of our heroine Sunny Randall, feisty and attractive Boston PI, and Jesse Stone, Parker’s Chief of Police of Paradise, Mass. (They reunite later in “Split Image.”) Sunny is hired to be a bodyguard for Erin Flint, both the gorgeous actress star of “Warrior” movies, and an aspiring major league baseball player. Soon thereafter, Erin’s Personal Assistant Misty is murdered, and Erin wants Sunny to work on that, the death occurring in Stone’s jurisdiction. And so Sunny and Jesse pair up to investigate the circumstances, definitely enjoying each other’s company, mostly late at night, in the process. Both still moon over broken marriages, but we’re mostly spared the therapy sessions that get a little heavy handed in some of the other entries in the 6-book Randall set. The hunt for clues eventually becomes a coast-to-coast affair, and one scene that occurs on Rodeo Drive will not be quickly forgotten! Meanwhile, we find out lots of interesting things about Erin and her sister; the solution to the case and the justice meted out at the end was novel and satisfying. Both Jesse and Sunny are fun characters we virtually always enjoy; and having them together, and happy, made “Blue” all the more an entertaining outing!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julaine

    I can't decide if I like this series or not. I thought this one was kind of boring and I didn't like the tie-in with Jesse Stone. I can't decide if I like this series or not. I thought this one was kind of boring and I didn't like the tie-in with Jesse Stone.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Leew49

    Buddy Bollen, a movie producer of questionable reputation, has a lot invested in his actress/girlfriend Erin Flint. Not only has the athletic beauty starred in the "Warrior Woman" movie series, but Bollen has a scheme to have her play for his major league baseball team. Bollen hires female private eye Sunny Randall to protect the spoiled and difficult actress, but it is Erin's sister Misty who is found murdered at his lavish estate. In addition to the people already named, the suspect list inclu Buddy Bollen, a movie producer of questionable reputation, has a lot invested in his actress/girlfriend Erin Flint. Not only has the athletic beauty starred in the "Warrior Woman" movie series, but Bollen has a scheme to have her play for his major league baseball team. Bollen hires female private eye Sunny Randall to protect the spoiled and difficult actress, but it is Erin's sister Misty who is found murdered at his lavish estate. In addition to the people already named, the suspect list includes a Los Angeles pimp and a local loan shark. Without giving away the ending, suffice it to say that the motive involves some inventive bookkeeping worthy of Gene Wilder's character in "The Producers." Sunny Randall is another mystery series created by the late Robert B Parker, best known for the Spenser novels and Jesse Stone. Like Spenser, Sunny relies on a diverse support group to get her through her crime-solving day: Her ex-husband has family connections with the local crime syndicate, while her father is an ex-cop. And lets not forget Spike, a friend who owns a local restaurant, and whose size and proficiency in the martial arts inevitably prove useful in difficult situations. His function in the Randall novels is similar to that of Hawk with Spenser. Parker has created a unified fictional world in which all his major crime investigators (Spenser, Stone, and Randall) live in or near Boston and can meet and interact. In addition to working with Stone on this case (and having a romantic relationship with him), Randall goes to Susan Silverman, Spenser's longtime girlfriend, for psychological counseling. Aside from overlapping characters and settings, the Sunny Randall novels are similar to Parker's other works: Clever dialogue, slightly padded storylines, entertaining without being too challenging to the reader. They make good escapist reading: a chance to absorb the mind without taxing it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Debfiddle

    Sunny Randall, the Boston P.I. with a personal life as tangled as that of her clients, is hired on as a bodyguard to an up-and-coming starlet, and discovers some ugly truths behind her glossy façade. Buddy Bollen is a C-list movie mogul who made his fortune producing films of questionable artistic merit. When Buddy hires Sunny Randall to protect his rising star and girlfriend, Erin Flint, Sunny knows from the start that the prickly, spoiled beauty won't make her job easy. And when Erin's sister, Sunny Randall, the Boston P.I. with a personal life as tangled as that of her clients, is hired on as a bodyguard to an up-and-coming starlet, and discovers some ugly truths behind her glossy façade. Buddy Bollen is a C-list movie mogul who made his fortune producing films of questionable artistic merit. When Buddy hires Sunny Randall to protect his rising star and girlfriend, Erin Flint, Sunny knows from the start that the prickly, spoiled beauty won't make her job easy. And when Erin's sister, Misty, is found dead in the lavish home they share with sugar daddy Bollen, there doesn't seem to be a single lead worth pursuing. But then Sunny meets Jesse Stone, chief of police in Paradise, Massachusetts, under whose jurisdiction the case falls. Tracking Misty's murderer reveals a host of seedy complications behind Erin's glamorous lifestyle as well as Buddy Bollen's entertainment empire, made up of shady film deals and mobsters out for revenge. But in a world where there's little difference between the good guys and the bad, exposing the killer could prove to be Sunny's undoing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Moyer

    Some books are meant to be savored, each word rolled around in your head like fine wine over your palate. Then there are books meant to be devoured whole, like a cold beer on a hot summer afternoon, refreshing, generic, and eminently satisfying. This was one of the latter. The late author was famour for creating Spenser, of the TV show Spenser for Hire. (people used to say I looked like Robert Urich.) In this book, he writes from the perspective of a female detective, Sunny Randall. It is full of Some books are meant to be savored, each word rolled around in your head like fine wine over your palate. Then there are books meant to be devoured whole, like a cold beer on a hot summer afternoon, refreshing, generic, and eminently satisfying. This was one of the latter. The late author was famour for creating Spenser, of the TV show Spenser for Hire. (people used to say I looked like Robert Urich.) In this book, he writes from the perspective of a female detective, Sunny Randall. It is full of smartass dialogue from Sunny and all the other characters, a not so complicated mystery, and sex between chapters. That means that the leadup to Sunny getting laid is the end of one chapter and the aftermath is the next. I liked that. Less gratuitous than the explicit crap a lot of writers seem to feel they need, but still fun. None of the book was particularly realistic, but it was a fun ride and well constructed.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn

    Well, I have to think about it for a minute to wonder why they called this book Blue Screen. Maybe because most of the movies talked about in it was made before a blue screen because the actor couldn't act, lololol I do like that Jesse & Sunny have gotten together but in a dressing room? On Rodeo Drive? Really? Page 24 . . . "Do you know who I am?" she said. (Ask Reese Witherspoon how asking that question helped her out, roflmao) Page 46 . . . "Follow the money," I said. "People mostly get killed Well, I have to think about it for a minute to wonder why they called this book Blue Screen. Maybe because most of the movies talked about in it was made before a blue screen because the actor couldn't act, lololol I do like that Jesse & Sunny have gotten together but in a dressing room? On Rodeo Drive? Really? Page 24 . . . "Do you know who I am?" she said. (Ask Reese Witherspoon how asking that question helped her out, roflmao) Page 46 . . . "Follow the money," I said. "People mostly get killed over money, or love," my father said. Page 104 . . . After a time, and still looking at the river, Felix said, "richie's gonna have a kid." . . .

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mark Edlund

    Mystery series - Sunny Randall finally meets Jesse Stone. Now lets see if all the three replacement writers can keep their plot lines in sync. In one of the Jesse Stone novels they have already blown it with a Spike reference and the Grey Gull. Sunny is hired to be a bodyguard to a talentless up and comer who thinks she can be everything to everybody. I can never figure out why people like her hire a PI when their previous lives are such a moral mess. The ending is not satisfying. Finally Jesse S Mystery series - Sunny Randall finally meets Jesse Stone. Now lets see if all the three replacement writers can keep their plot lines in sync. In one of the Jesse Stone novels they have already blown it with a Spike reference and the Grey Gull. Sunny is hired to be a bodyguard to a talentless up and comer who thinks she can be everything to everybody. I can never figure out why people like her hire a PI when their previous lives are such a moral mess. The ending is not satisfying. Finally Jesse Stone and Sunny meet in Paradise (the town, not the ideal) and their complicated relationship is now told from Sunny's perspective. No Canadian or pharmacy references.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathi

    This is the fifth in a series, and the first one that I have read. The author makes the mistake of assuming that the reader is familiar with the background characters (Spike, Richie) and fails to introduce them to the new reader. This is similar to Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum, David Rosenfelt's Andy Carpenter and Lawrence Sanders' Archie McNally series: light who-dunnit, not a lot of action or violence. But nowhere near as good or fun. The lead character is a female private eye, but I don't This is the fifth in a series, and the first one that I have read. The author makes the mistake of assuming that the reader is familiar with the background characters (Spike, Richie) and fails to introduce them to the new reader. This is similar to Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum, David Rosenfelt's Andy Carpenter and Lawrence Sanders' Archie McNally series: light who-dunnit, not a lot of action or violence. But nowhere near as good or fun. The lead character is a female private eye, but I don't get a female vibe from her. She thinks like a man. Weak ending. And, grapes are toxic to dogs. 2 stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Robby

    Enjoyable, but not my favorite. This one stands out because of the crossover with Jesse Stone. I generally like Sunny Randall as a character but there are a few things that bug me. She is supposed to be a strong female character but in every book whenever things get tough she relies on her friend Spike, or her dad, or her mob uncle, to get her out of jams. I like all of those characters, and think them helping her out is fine, but the same pattern happens in every book and it gets pretty old. Th Enjoyable, but not my favorite. This one stands out because of the crossover with Jesse Stone. I generally like Sunny Randall as a character but there are a few things that bug me. She is supposed to be a strong female character but in every book whenever things get tough she relies on her friend Spike, or her dad, or her mob uncle, to get her out of jams. I like all of those characters, and think them helping her out is fine, but the same pattern happens in every book and it gets pretty old. The repetition makes it feel like she can’t really solve problems on her own.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Don Friedman

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My introduction to Robert Parker. A fast, often but not always funny treat! Great for COVID lockdown reading. Sunny Randall a private detective is asked to serve as bodyguard for a hugely gorgeous and successful and talentless movie star. Her patron insists on her having protection. We learn the justification when one of her staff, who we later learn is her sister, is murdered. Randall, a Parker regular, teams up with Jesse Stone, small town sheriff, also a regular, to solve the case. It's fun. My introduction to Robert Parker. A fast, often but not always funny treat! Great for COVID lockdown reading. Sunny Randall a private detective is asked to serve as bodyguard for a hugely gorgeous and successful and talentless movie star. Her patron insists on her having protection. We learn the justification when one of her staff, who we later learn is her sister, is murdered. Randall, a Parker regular, teams up with Jesse Stone, small town sheriff, also a regular, to solve the case. It's fun.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kem

    This is a convoluted puzzle difficult to follow. There is no real closure. I like Sunny. This is the first book I've read in her series. Of course I really like Jessie and have read all of his series. The culprit is immature and has been used her whole life with never anyone to guide her. I felt sorry for her on one level, but on another she should have been forced into confined therapy until she grows up. This is a convoluted puzzle difficult to follow. There is no real closure. I like Sunny. This is the first book I've read in her series. Of course I really like Jessie and have read all of his series. The culprit is immature and has been used her whole life with never anyone to guide her. I felt sorry for her on one level, but on another she should have been forced into confined therapy until she grows up.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thomas R.

    Blue Screen Blue Screen is the latest in the Sunny Randall series , a Character created by The late Robert B. Parker and continued by Ms. Burton. She has managed to continue the smart, and sassy dialogue that Parker was famous for. In this story Randall teams up with Chief Jesse Stone another great character in the Parker Series. This story has Hollywood Hijinks, sex trafficking and four tortured souls trying to save themselves.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nola

    Another great book in the Sunny Randall series! It's not necessary to read the books in order, but I think it's more interesting to do so. The characters continue to develop and mature as the books progress. These books are well written and move along at a fast pace. The plot is always intriguing and I never have it figured out! There's always a twist or development I didn't see coming. Another great book in the Sunny Randall series! It's not necessary to read the books in order, but I think it's more interesting to do so. The characters continue to develop and mature as the books progress. These books are well written and move along at a fast pace. The plot is always intriguing and I never have it figured out! There's always a twist or development I didn't see coming.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    This is not the first Parker I read, but I never marked which ones they were. And I've never sought them out. Somehow men just keep giving these books to me. And while they're not unreadable, I always walk away wondering, is this how you think people really are? At least this one went fast, and had slightly less superfluous description than the others I vaguely remember reading. This is not the first Parker I read, but I never marked which ones they were. And I've never sought them out. Somehow men just keep giving these books to me. And while they're not unreadable, I always walk away wondering, is this how you think people really are? At least this one went fast, and had slightly less superfluous description than the others I vaguely remember reading.

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Biddle

    I think this is an inferior Parker. Too much chick lit, too little crime solving. I overlook Spencer's treacle with and about Susan, but there's a good Spencer story to make up for it. Here there's more love talk and emotion plumbing but the rest of the book just doesn't make up for it. Too much boredom for too little excitement. I think this is an inferior Parker. Too much chick lit, too little crime solving. I overlook Spencer's treacle with and about Susan, but there's a good Spencer story to make up for it. Here there's more love talk and emotion plumbing but the rest of the book just doesn't make up for it. Too much boredom for too little excitement.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ryan McHargue

    A new character and city with some great writing and plot. Parker had written Sunny for Helen Hunt if I remember correctly and it added to the read. The main character isn't just a female version of Spenser or an over masculinized woman, she is fully fleshed out as a person. A bit tough, but very feminine where it feels appropriate. A new character and city with some great writing and plot. Parker had written Sunny for Helen Hunt if I remember correctly and it added to the read. The main character isn't just a female version of Spenser or an over masculinized woman, she is fully fleshed out as a person. A bit tough, but very feminine where it feels appropriate.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Richard K Simpson

    Sunny Randle is a very good read. Sunny and Jesse Stone were great with their verbal/sexual play. Spencer is still my favorite Parker character but Sunny and Jesse are very good too!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alec Peche

    As compared to other Jessie Stone books, this one spent a little too much time on the relationship between Sunny Randall and Jesse Stone. Also, while I agreed with the resolution of the murder mystery, I don’t think it at all mirrored real life.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris Birdy

    This is one of Robert Parker's best books. Sunny Randall, a Boston PI, gets involved with a strange client then meets Jesse Stone, the Pardise chief of police. Sparks fly in all directions when they jointly work on a case while working through their own commitment issues. This is one of Robert Parker's best books. Sunny Randall, a Boston PI, gets involved with a strange client then meets Jesse Stone, the Pardise chief of police. Sparks fly in all directions when they jointly work on a case while working through their own commitment issues.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    I just started reading "Robert B. Parker's" books and I wish I had started sooner. I started reading the Sunny Randall series, she was a Private Eye and did well for herself, but her Dad was a retired Captain and he could give her inside tips. I just started reading "Robert B. Parker's" books and I wish I had started sooner. I started reading the Sunny Randall series, she was a Private Eye and did well for herself, but her Dad was a retired Captain and he could give her inside tips.

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