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Doctor Omega (Annotated) (Unabridged English Edition)

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• Complete, unabridged English translation • Now with an Historical Afterword by Ron Miller • Accompanied by the original illustraions Featured in Ron Miller’s “The Conquest of Space Book Series.” Originally published in 1906, Arnould Galopin's novel tells of a flight to Mars by three Frenchman in an antigravity spaceship, the Cosmos. At the publisher's request, this title is • Complete, unabridged English translation • Now with an Historical Afterword by Ron Miller • Accompanied by the original illustraions Featured in Ron Miller’s “The Conquest of Space Book Series.” Originally published in 1906, Arnould Galopin's novel tells of a flight to Mars by three Frenchman in an antigravity spaceship, the Cosmos. At the publisher's request, this title is sold without DRM (DRM Rights Management).


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• Complete, unabridged English translation • Now with an Historical Afterword by Ron Miller • Accompanied by the original illustraions Featured in Ron Miller’s “The Conquest of Space Book Series.” Originally published in 1906, Arnould Galopin's novel tells of a flight to Mars by three Frenchman in an antigravity spaceship, the Cosmos. At the publisher's request, this title is • Complete, unabridged English translation • Now with an Historical Afterword by Ron Miller • Accompanied by the original illustraions Featured in Ron Miller’s “The Conquest of Space Book Series.” Originally published in 1906, Arnould Galopin's novel tells of a flight to Mars by three Frenchman in an antigravity spaceship, the Cosmos. At the publisher's request, this title is sold without DRM (DRM Rights Management).

35 review for Doctor Omega (Annotated) (Unabridged English Edition)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    Another book in the vain of The First Men in the Moon, which of course was famously sued for plagiarism by the author of a A Plunge Into Space but nobody cares about that because the latter is terrible.. and is itself derivative of Across the Zodiac anyway. This one has all the dryness of a victorian novel but without the scientific interest and all the pulp of later sci-fi without any of the excitement. Its slock, nonsense, drivvel. It also takes elements of From the Earth to the Moon, 20,000 Le Another book in the vain of The First Men in the Moon, which of course was famously sued for plagiarism by the author of a A Plunge Into Space but nobody cares about that because the latter is terrible.. and is itself derivative of Across the Zodiac anyway. This one has all the dryness of a victorian novel but without the scientific interest and all the pulp of later sci-fi without any of the excitement. Its slock, nonsense, drivvel. It also takes elements of From the Earth to the Moon, 20,000 Leagues, The Master of the World and Gulliver's Travels. Its not all bad, the aliens are more like 1950s martians than you might expect, it also might be losing a little in translation but i doubt it. Any attempts to equate Dr.Omega with Dr.Who are spurious, although i wouldn't be surprised if both characters received some influence from Moriarty of the Holmes stories. Some small elements of scifi interest but barely worth the reading effort.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Kresal

    For years as a Doctor Who fan, I've been vaguely aware of something called Doctor Omega. No, it isn't a spin-off of the long-running British science fiction series. In fact, it predates the BBC series by more than a half-century. Originally published in French as Le Docteur Oméga in 1906, this early science fiction novel with its tale of interplanetary exploration featuring a title character who is an old man with white hair certainly would seem on the surface to be quite like William Hartnell's For years as a Doctor Who fan, I've been vaguely aware of something called Doctor Omega. No, it isn't a spin-off of the long-running British science fiction series. In fact, it predates the BBC series by more than a half-century. Originally published in French as Le Docteur Oméga in 1906, this early science fiction novel with its tale of interplanetary exploration featuring a title character who is an old man with white hair certainly would seem on the surface to be quite like William Hartnell's First Doctor. Yet is there more to it than that? Is Doctor Omega the predecessor to Doctor Who? Well, it depends on which version of it you happen to be reading. Most readers (including many of my fellow reviewers here on Goodreads) will have read the 2003 edition published by the Los Angeles based Black Coat Press, the one "adapted and retold" by Jean-Marc Lofficier and Randy Lofficier. Rather than being a straight translation, that edition appears to have played up the Doctor Who angle and made quite a few changes (as per the "adapted and retold" line). It is that edition, more than the original work, that seems to have led to numerous spin-offs involving the character. It's a move that's proven quite lucrative if not perhaps utterly faithful to the original work. Knowing this, I decided to track down the straight French to English translation if one was even available. Thankfully Black Cat Press put it out in time for Doctor Who's fiftieth anniversary in 2013. Reading that recently has been an interesting experience though not the one I was quite expecting. There are some similarities with Doctor Who it has to be said. The title character, an eccentric older man with white hair, definitely has shades of the First Doctor to him just from that description alone though the novel makes it quite clear he is a Frenchman and not a Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey in the constellation of Kasterborous. That's something even more striking given the illustrations included from 1906 which shows an even more remarkable resemblance to actor William Hartnell. Doctor Omega's dialogue also has a ring of Hartnell First Doctor to it much of the time, making it even more striking. There are additional moments of familiarity as well. The large portion of the novel set on Mars also has some of the travelogue feel found in many of the longer stories from the era such as Marco Polo or The Keys Of Marinus. The fact that the story is told in the first person by one of the Doctor's companions, a middle-aged French violinist named Dennis Borel, brings up memories of Doctor Who and the Daleks, the first ever Doctor Who book which was likewise told the first Dalek story that was told from the point of view of Ian Chesterton. With all that in mind, it isn't hard to see why the Lofficier's and so many others have drawn connections to the BBC series. Yet in reading the original work without it being "adapted and retold" what struck me wasn't the connections to Doctor Who at all. Instead, Doctor Omega as a novel seems far closer to 1906 than 1963. That would be HG Wells' SF classic The First Men in the Moon which author Arnould Galopin is almost certainly doing a pastiche (if not outright rip-off) of Wells' tale with his depiction of the journey to Mars and the encounter with the Martian monarch late in the story. There are shades of Jules Verne as well as the Doctor's craft Cosmos being very much like the famous Columbiad seen in From The Earth To The Moon and its sequel Around The Moon. If anything, Doctor Omega has far more in common with those works than a BBC TV series. What is also clear is that Galopin's novel is very much a product of its time. While his Mars owes much to Wells and it has the prerequisite touches of genre fiction, it might as well be the Africa of countless adventure novels of the same period much of the time. Indeed for all of his similarities to the First Doctor, our lead character has no problem making the occasional reference to primitive peoples while carrying a gun and threatening to massacre the short grey Martians at one point. Elsewhere, the narrator has no problem making similarly vaguely racist comments that, while not out of place in polite society in 1906, very much date the novel more than a century later. All works of "art" are of course the product of the era in which they are created so if one can look past that, there's an interesting read. So is Le Docteur Oméga the long-lost predecessor to the BBC's Doctor Who? For my money, the answer is "no". While there are points of similarity, there aren't enough for me to draw a direct line between the two and the fact that the work didn't appear in English until after the turn of the twenty-first century further undermines the case. That said, it certainly feels like a proto-Doctor Who story at times in the same way The First Men In The Moon does today. So for those who are interested in early SF or stories that inspired the steampunk genre, I wholeheartedly recommend the novel. Just don't be expecting a TARDIS or a sonic screwdriver.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Peel

    A very early French SF adventure, concerning the trip to Mars by the mysterious Doctor Omega. Very inventive, but rather problematic - the attitudes of the main characters are rather unpleasant at times. This edition also suffers from a large number of typographic errors and sections of missing words. The afterword about the history of space travel in SF is very illuminating, though.

  4. 5 out of 5

    DavidO

    5 stars for being useful for learning French without being overwhelming, but only 2 stars for the story. it really didn't hold up to the test of time. 5 stars for being useful for learning French without being overwhelming, but only 2 stars for the story. it really didn't hold up to the test of time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nathalie Poirier

  6. 4 out of 5

    J.C.PALARDY

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Coronado

  8. 5 out of 5

    Louis Gerard Ledru

  9. 5 out of 5

    Yannick Imbert

  10. 5 out of 5

    Richard Fontaine

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dilaraa

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  13. 5 out of 5

    William Oarlock

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eugene booker

  15. 4 out of 5

    marjolaine germain

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jwebster1985

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eugene booker

  18. 5 out of 5

    Softymel

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lucian

  20. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

  21. 5 out of 5

    Victor Lopez

  22. 5 out of 5

    Goreti

  23. 4 out of 5

    Artsvard

  24. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Vañek

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Gonzalez

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ştefan Tiron

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tristan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ze89

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Longstreth

  30. 4 out of 5

    David

  31. 5 out of 5

    Conor

  32. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

  33. 5 out of 5

    BrokenEye, the True False Prophet

  34. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  35. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Brisendine

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