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The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath

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In a world beyond the walls of sleep, Randolph Carter goes in search of an opulent and mysterious sunset city. First, he must go to Kadath, home of the Gods, where he hopes to be guided to the city of his dreams. No one has ever been to Kadath, and no one even knows how to get there – but that won’t stop Carter from trying. In this masterful adaptation of Lovecraft’s class In a world beyond the walls of sleep, Randolph Carter goes in search of an opulent and mysterious sunset city. First, he must go to Kadath, home of the Gods, where he hopes to be guided to the city of his dreams. No one has ever been to Kadath, and no one even knows how to get there – but that won’t stop Carter from trying. In this masterful adaptation of Lovecraft’s classic novella, I. N. J. Culbard captures Carter’s journey through the dangerous and spectacular Dreamlands in beautiful, gripping detail.


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In a world beyond the walls of sleep, Randolph Carter goes in search of an opulent and mysterious sunset city. First, he must go to Kadath, home of the Gods, where he hopes to be guided to the city of his dreams. No one has ever been to Kadath, and no one even knows how to get there – but that won’t stop Carter from trying. In this masterful adaptation of Lovecraft’s class In a world beyond the walls of sleep, Randolph Carter goes in search of an opulent and mysterious sunset city. First, he must go to Kadath, home of the Gods, where he hopes to be guided to the city of his dreams. No one has ever been to Kadath, and no one even knows how to get there – but that won’t stop Carter from trying. In this masterful adaptation of Lovecraft’s classic novella, I. N. J. Culbard captures Carter’s journey through the dangerous and spectacular Dreamlands in beautiful, gripping detail.

30 review for The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Randolph Carter wanders the dreamlands in search of Kadath, home of the gods, in order to find a path to the sunset city of his dreams. First off, I'm going to say something that may get me eaten alive by a swarm of zoogs but I've never held the writing of H.P. Lovecraft in high regard despite loving a lot of his concepts. Untold aeons ago, I read the prose version of The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath. When I saw the graphic novel version, I decided it was time to revisit it. The Dream-Quest of Un Randolph Carter wanders the dreamlands in search of Kadath, home of the gods, in order to find a path to the sunset city of his dreams. First off, I'm going to say something that may get me eaten alive by a swarm of zoogs but I've never held the writing of H.P. Lovecraft in high regard despite loving a lot of his concepts. Untold aeons ago, I read the prose version of The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath. When I saw the graphic novel version, I decided it was time to revisit it. The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath works fairly well as a graphic novel. The adaptation has a somewhat disjointed feel, which I think fits the tale since it is a dream, after all. Unlike a lot of Lovecraft tales, it's a quest story rather than a race toward insanity. Randolph Carter encounters all manner of Lovecraftian beasties on his journey and I.N.J. Culbard depicts them rather well. Much like the pacing, the art contributes to the dreamlike feel of the story. Even though I only have vague recollections of reading the prose version of this story, I felt like something was missing at times. The transitions from scene to scene were a little rough in places. Overall, though, I felt this was a worthwhile adaptation. Three out of five stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I.N.J. Culbard has for some time taken up the task of adapter/illustrator of H. P. Lovecraft's works. I picked up his huge, four-novel omnibus collection recently but saw that I had already read one or two, so decided to review them separately. This is the first one in the collection, and is the least horror-oriented of his works I have read. But let me add a caveat here, that I don't recall reading the original Lovecraft tale; I am sure I must have, in my teens, but I only have a vague memory o I.N.J. Culbard has for some time taken up the task of adapter/illustrator of H. P. Lovecraft's works. I picked up his huge, four-novel omnibus collection recently but saw that I had already read one or two, so decided to review them separately. This is the first one in the collection, and is the least horror-oriented of his works I have read. But let me add a caveat here, that I don't recall reading the original Lovecraft tale; I am sure I must have, in my teens, but I only have a vague memory of his prose, which some find lush and atmospheric and creepy, but I tend to find a bit turgid. Dream-Quest reads more along the lines of an Edgar Rice Burroughs fantasy/adventure than the chilling horror of another of Lovecraft's influences, Edgar Allen Poe. It's a dream quest, fair enough! So it is perfect for a comics adaptation, less narrative than a tone or mood piece, a collection of effects. I like the color and dream logic of it well enough, but I have already essentially forgotten what happens in it. I might have given it 4 stars for embodying the dream state and paring down the actual words to its essence, but I have experienced other illustrators visually capturing the Lovecraft vibe for me with greater detail (Culbard fills in very few backgrounds) such as Gabriel Rodriguez in Locke and Key: Welcome to Lovecraft, or (especially!) Jacen Burrows working with Alan Moore in Providence.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Forrest

    A worthy effort by I.N.J. Culbard. This is a good, though not great adaption, of H.P. Lovecraft's quest-adventure. There are some outstanding cinematic moments, but this work is not nearly as compelling at Jason Thompson's version of the same. Completists will want the Culbard version, but if you're looking for "bang for the buck," I would definitely go with Thompson's incredible work. Special thanks to the always wonderful Dan Schwent for turning me on to this version and generously sharing an e A worthy effort by I.N.J. Culbard. This is a good, though not great adaption, of H.P. Lovecraft's quest-adventure. There are some outstanding cinematic moments, but this work is not nearly as compelling at Jason Thompson's version of the same. Completists will want the Culbard version, but if you're looking for "bang for the buck," I would definitely go with Thompson's incredible work. Special thanks to the always wonderful Dan Schwent for turning me on to this version and generously sharing an e-peek at it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Randolph Carter dreams of a sunset city and decides to go looking for it(?!). His nutty friend tells him to pray to the dream gods or something and they’ll let him find it again (!?). Bonkers bullshit ensues! The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath is plotted using dream logic, ie. anything goes! Carter rocks up in a forest of giant mushrooms with talking rodents. He sets sail on flying ships full of humanoid monsters, meets the Cats of Ulthar (who, of course, also talk) all so he can travel to a mount Randolph Carter dreams of a sunset city and decides to go looking for it(?!). His nutty friend tells him to pray to the dream gods or something and they’ll let him find it again (!?). Bonkers bullshit ensues! The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath is plotted using dream logic, ie. anything goes! Carter rocks up in a forest of giant mushrooms with talking rodents. He sets sail on flying ships full of humanoid monsters, meets the Cats of Ulthar (who, of course, also talk) all so he can travel to a mountain with a face on the side. Like a dream, you can’t really make sense of the story, you can only let it wash over you. And that’s why it leaves so slight an impression. It’s a quest story where the end goal is never very clear and the resolution is puzzling. Everything that happens along the way is similarly confusing and random so it’s hard to care about any of it. This is HP Lovecraft at his most free-flowing and least horrific, and yet completely uninteresting too. It’s wholly unengaging as nothing in the story feels like it matters. Sure, INJ Culbard’s art is great, especially as he’s given more range with this story to cut loose and draw big, exotic, fantastical landscapes and creatures, but Lovecraft’s rambling, barely coherent story is totally forgettable. Lovecraft wasn’t just a shaky writer but quite often he was a weak storyteller too as shown by Dream-Quest. His strengths lay in the horrific visions he conjured up that leapt off the page. A few panels are like that here but not nearly enough to call this anywhere near compelling or worth seeking out. The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath is the weakest in the Culbard/Lovecraft adaptations. Maybe this has connections to Lovecraft’s Great Old Ones mythos but I’m not that big a fan to say. Kadath, what/whoever it is, remains unknown!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    So on to the next of my catch up titles. This is another of the H P Lovecraft titles - however its rather different in that its from his Dream Cycle of stories and is in fact probably the longest of the series. Here we have the challenges of the famous dreamer Randolph Carter on his quest - for yes you guessed it Unknown Kadath. Okay you know me by now with my no spoilers policy so you will need to read the book (or at least the story) to find out if he finds it or not but like many of these stor So on to the next of my catch up titles. This is another of the H P Lovecraft titles - however its rather different in that its from his Dream Cycle of stories and is in fact probably the longest of the series. Here we have the challenges of the famous dreamer Randolph Carter on his quest - for yes you guessed it Unknown Kadath. Okay you know me by now with my no spoilers policy so you will need to read the book (or at least the story) to find out if he finds it or not but like many of these stories there is more often than not more going on while trying to complete the quest than the actual goal at the end of it. The thing that I think most impresses me with this story is that even though the lands and people are pretty fantastic even for Lovecraft (after all anything goes in the Dreamlands) the artists are still able to capture and convey that sense of wonder and otherness to the page. You actually do feel you are feeling through the underground caverns or charging across the grass covered plans. for me I think this is probably the most enjoyable of the books (although I have still yet 2 more to collect and read) and I think the artists at least probably had the most fun with it too (it sort of shows). Another great title in the series and I cannot wait to read more.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    Bullet Review: This was...good. I don't think I was nearly as excited about this as The Shadow Out of Time, but it was interesting and unique. Really bizarre, as you would expect from a graphic novel about a dream. I can only imagine how challenging it might have been for Lovecraft to intricately detail this world, given he had only words to use - the graphic artist has an arsenal of tools so that you can see what the narrator is seeing. The author can only use words. Anyway, it was a good read, a Bullet Review: This was...good. I don't think I was nearly as excited about this as The Shadow Out of Time, but it was interesting and unique. Really bizarre, as you would expect from a graphic novel about a dream. I can only imagine how challenging it might have been for Lovecraft to intricately detail this world, given he had only words to use - the graphic artist has an arsenal of tools so that you can see what the narrator is seeing. The author can only use words. Anyway, it was a good read, and I'm glad I chose the graphic route to read Lovecraft.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    The art is a bit sketchy at times, especially with the ghouls and their rictus-grins, but on the whole this is an excellent adaptation of an already great story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Randolph

    Another good adaptation of Lovecraft by Culbard. Because he uses images he does not include all of the text, which has its advantages and disadvantages, so the reader should be familiar with the Lovecraft novella before looking at this. It would definitely have lost some understandability without prior knowledge. But this is the audience Culbard is aiming for anyway. If you want all the words, look to Jason Bradley Thompson's graphic novel The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath & Other Stories which Another good adaptation of Lovecraft by Culbard. Because he uses images he does not include all of the text, which has its advantages and disadvantages, so the reader should be familiar with the Lovecraft novella before looking at this. It would definitely have lost some understandability without prior knowledge. But this is the audience Culbard is aiming for anyway. If you want all the words, look to Jason Bradley Thompson's graphic novel The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath & Other Stories which has the disadvantage of not having color. Culbard, like Thompson, has the positive of being a faithful adaptation without any additions or embellishments (or any "updating") to the Lovecraft story. Those graphic novelists that have tried to out-Lovecraft Lovecraft have usually failed. Better your own original or at least original Lovecraftian story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I'd already read this story earlier this year so I was excited to see a graphic novel version. I have a hard time visualizing things in books some times. Unfortunately, although beautifully rendered, it was abridged too much for me to give it more than 2 stars. I'd already read this story earlier this year so I was excited to see a graphic novel version. I have a hard time visualizing things in books some times. Unfortunately, although beautifully rendered, it was abridged too much for me to give it more than 2 stars.

  10. 4 out of 5

    The_Mad_Swede

    I. N. J. Culbard may well be the ultimate Lovecraft adapter into the comics medium for me. I have previously enjoyed his take on The Shadow Out of Time and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward respectively, so checking this out from the library was an absolute no-brainer. Now, the story of The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath is a slightly different one from the types of tales told in The Shadow Out of Time and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward in that it deals more with a phantasmagoria beyond Ear I. N. J. Culbard may well be the ultimate Lovecraft adapter into the comics medium for me. I have previously enjoyed his take on The Shadow Out of Time and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward respectively, so checking this out from the library was an absolute no-brainer. Now, the story of The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath is a slightly different one from the types of tales told in The Shadow Out of Time and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward in that it deals more with a phantasmagoria beyond Earth and in a wider cosmic aspect, moving through other realms, but Culbard handles this eminently, and I find myself joyously tagging along for the ride as it were.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Molli B.

    Weird. Weirrrrd. Culbard's art is good, with the most stunning pages right near the end. His art is somewhat...I guess minimalist isn't the right word, but I'm not sure what is, and I think it suits Lovecraft's work. It leaves a bit to the imagination. I love graphic novels and comic books but I'm such a word person that sometimes I wonder what I'm missing from a story when I don't have all of the author's words. I wonder if I would have understood this more or less if I'd read the actual story—m Weird. Weirrrrd. Culbard's art is good, with the most stunning pages right near the end. His art is somewhat...I guess minimalist isn't the right word, but I'm not sure what is, and I think it suits Lovecraft's work. It leaves a bit to the imagination. I love graphic novels and comic books but I'm such a word person that sometimes I wonder what I'm missing from a story when I don't have all of the author's words. I wonder if I would have understood this more or less if I'd read the actual story—maybe I'll do that someday to find out.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Etienne

    I had never read, or at least I don't remember reading, this story of Lovecraft, so it's harder to judge the adaptation, but it felt a bit confusing at time, maybe too many things were cut, to make it shorter, I like the art and the weird exploration of dream and strange place, so we're not sure if that a dream or reality, but it just felt like something was missing to make it whole. I had never read, or at least I don't remember reading, this story of Lovecraft, so it's harder to judge the adaptation, but it felt a bit confusing at time, maybe too many things were cut, to make it shorter, I like the art and the weird exploration of dream and strange place, so we're not sure if that a dream or reality, but it just felt like something was missing to make it whole.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris Browning

    The weakest Culbard Lovecraft adaptation, because there’s only so much you can do with a hoary old pile of nonsense like Dream Quest. The art is startling but the plot is no clearer and not even Culbard can fully escape the Lovecraftian bigotry with some slightly iffy looking swarthy foreigns who are almost certainly far better than their original forms but still are decidedly dubious

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Glatt

    The story was more fanciful than horrifying, although the images were strong, and sometimes scarily so. Those unfamiliar with Lovecraft's work will likely be confused by this sparse retelling. Fans will enjoy the imagery as their minds "fill in" the gaps. The story was more fanciful than horrifying, although the images were strong, and sometimes scarily so. Those unfamiliar with Lovecraft's work will likely be confused by this sparse retelling. Fans will enjoy the imagery as their minds "fill in" the gaps.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Essi

    The art was cool, the story tedious and pompous (and the guy was racist anyway).

  16. 4 out of 5

    S.M.M. Lindström

    With Lovecraft's prose being what it is - and with some of us not having English as our first language - I greatly appreciate art heavy adaptions of his stories. This is a good one. A bit dark, visually I mean, which made some scenes hard to "read". But that said, it slims down a very wordy if interesting story to make it more accessible to, well, eveyone. The story itself? Well, this is one of those stories that I think of as not being completely enchanting but an important influence on things th With Lovecraft's prose being what it is - and with some of us not having English as our first language - I greatly appreciate art heavy adaptions of his stories. This is a good one. A bit dark, visually I mean, which made some scenes hard to "read". But that said, it slims down a very wordy if interesting story to make it more accessible to, well, eveyone. The story itself? Well, this is one of those stories that I think of as not being completely enchanting but an important influence on things that were written after it. Not that it's a boring story, and it has a very dream like feel to it. It's just smacks a lot of "white middle aged men are special and/or the default human". That should not come as a surprise to anyone who's ever read Lovecraft though. I recommend this book to people who like stories about dreams and most general Fantasy themes. It's not a horror story, at least not for people nowadays, I think. Also, what was up with that last page? Interesting.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Harper Jean

    I recall being completely enchanted by the original Lovecraft novel when I read it in high school. I must have mixed up some of my memories of it with other stories, though, and my memories of the actual plot faded, because this wasn't quite what I expected. I did really enjoy his adaptation - the art is beautiful and it really captured the mood of the book well in parts - it is dreamlike, hypnotic, and spooky, though seldom quite as much so as I remember the original being. I felt the pacing wa I recall being completely enchanted by the original Lovecraft novel when I read it in high school. I must have mixed up some of my memories of it with other stories, though, and my memories of the actual plot faded, because this wasn't quite what I expected. I did really enjoy his adaptation - the art is beautiful and it really captured the mood of the book well in parts - it is dreamlike, hypnotic, and spooky, though seldom quite as much so as I remember the original being. I felt the pacing was a bit rushed, leaving out bits of the story, jumping ahead - though the book itself does a fair amount of that, so I can't be too sure - and possibly leaving the reader unfamiliar with the original the feeling that they're missing something. Still, it's quite lovely.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    I.N.J. Culbard's adaptation, and illustration, of this Lovecraft narrative is definitely intriguing. However, I wish I had read and was familiar with the original, since that'd give me something more to go on. Reading through Culbard's version, I kept feeling that I was missing something, that there were parts of this story just out of my grasp. But perhaps that's what Lovecraft (and Culbard) intended with this narrative about the dreamworld and its links to the waking life. And as a stand-alone I.N.J. Culbard's adaptation, and illustration, of this Lovecraft narrative is definitely intriguing. However, I wish I had read and was familiar with the original, since that'd give me something more to go on. Reading through Culbard's version, I kept feeling that I was missing something, that there were parts of this story just out of my grasp. But perhaps that's what Lovecraft (and Culbard) intended with this narrative about the dreamworld and its links to the waking life. And as a stand-alone text, without any context to Lovecraft, the story works fairly well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Turns out I haven't read H.P.'s unfinished original which would explain why this took me so off-guard. Talking cats?! Zoogs?! Gugs?!! What is this shenaniganery?! The art was wonderful, as usual, if not as remarkable to me as this story adapts really easily to comics (it's a quest!). Gorgeous colors, though, equally lovely and frightful; I'm going to try and get through more of the original before the year's out, though I read for what felt like hours last night and managed all of 8 H.P. pages. Turns out I haven't read H.P.'s unfinished original which would explain why this took me so off-guard. Talking cats?! Zoogs?! Gugs?!! What is this shenaniganery?! The art was wonderful, as usual, if not as remarkable to me as this story adapts really easily to comics (it's a quest!). Gorgeous colors, though, equally lovely and frightful; I'm going to try and get through more of the original before the year's out, though I read for what felt like hours last night and managed all of 8 H.P. pages.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eamonn Murphy

    Artist I.N.J. Culbard has adapted another H.P. Lovecraft story after winning an award for ‘At The Mountains Of Madness’. ‘The Dream-Quest Of Unknown Kadath’, a quirky work even by Lovecraft’s standards, was not published in his lifetime. Posthumously, of course, every word he ever penned in now available in one form or another. This story brings together several elements from other tales in Lovecraft’s so-called ‘Dream Cycle’. These include ‘The Cat’s Of Ulthar’, ‘The Doom That Came To Sarnath’, Artist I.N.J. Culbard has adapted another H.P. Lovecraft story after winning an award for ‘At The Mountains Of Madness’. ‘The Dream-Quest Of Unknown Kadath’, a quirky work even by Lovecraft’s standards, was not published in his lifetime. Posthumously, of course, every word he ever penned in now available in one form or another. This story brings together several elements from other tales in Lovecraft’s so-called ‘Dream Cycle’. These include ‘The Cat’s Of Ulthar’, ‘The Doom That Came To Sarnath’, ‘Celephais’ and ‘Nyarlathotep’, amongst others. A few of them were written very early in his career for his own pleasure. In fact, Lovecraft always wrote to please himself and the fact that someone actually wanted to print the stuff was a bonus. He never wrote with the market in mind, which is why he’s so original and deservedly has gained a literary reputation. In this story, Randolph Carter, Lovecraft’s alter ego, has dreamed three times of a marvellous city named Celephais, ‘in the valley of Ooth-Nargai beyond the Tanarian hills’. He wants to go and live there in the dreamworlds, leaving the real one behind. So he prays to the hidden gods of dream and goes on a quest, which takes him across several different landscapes, where he encounters a variety of strange creatures. Nasty zoogs and gugs are out to get him but the cats of Ulthar are his friends. It’s weird fantasy set in imaginative realms with almost no connection to the mundane world. Quests are not my favourite type of yarn as they can easily become a mere parade of ‘wonders’ that become boring after a while. Happily, this one doesn’t go on long enough for that to happen as the original work was a novella, not the three thick volumes of modern fantasy. The ending, I should add, is excellent and quite unexpected. Lovecraft’s writing is an acquired taste but one I have acquired. The art of I.N.J. Culbard is also an acquired taste and one I’m working on, not always successfully. The first issue of ‘Brass Sun’ was pretty good but the pictures were not so great thereafter. At his best, he has a gift for good storytelling with panels and a very simple linear design technique that can be pleasing. At his worst, the page looks like it was drawn by a child. This adaptation does not contain his best all the way through but there are some good panels, particularly a double page spread near the end. I recommend sneaking a peek at the pages before you buy to see if the pictures appeal for, in my view, a graphic novel is not worth having if you actively dislike the art. At the moment, I’m ambivalent about Culbard. I will say that he seems to have converted much of the prose into pictures as the work is not heavy on captions. Art and dialogue carry the story along and it’s a quick, easy read. Lovecraft isn’t. Ever! But he’s worth the effort. It’s a nice edition physically, on good quality paper and with plenty of pages for your pounds. It’s a moot point whether Lovecraft should be adapted to visual form as all those indescribable horrors may be best left to the readers’ imagination. Culbard is trying though and he deserves an ‘A’ for effort. Eamonn Murphy This review first appeared at https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alex Watts-barnett

    I love the original and jumped at the idea of there being a graphic adaptation available however, there's not enough meat here either for fans of the original or newcomers. Lovecraft wrote the "Dreamquest" with a considerable amount of detail but the somewhat minimalist art style appears to be incapable of capturing the vast majority of it. The artist seems to have taken many liberties with a number of creature and location designs that seem to be at odds with what I thought were fairly cohesive I love the original and jumped at the idea of there being a graphic adaptation available however, there's not enough meat here either for fans of the original or newcomers. Lovecraft wrote the "Dreamquest" with a considerable amount of detail but the somewhat minimalist art style appears to be incapable of capturing the vast majority of it. The artist seems to have taken many liberties with a number of creature and location designs that seem to be at odds with what I thought were fairly cohesive outlines in the original book. I don't mind artists taking creative freedoms, but blandness is never a good look. Major story beats, are also glossed over as the writer opts to tell rather than show, reducing what were a number of rather compelling moments in the original to quick exchanges of dialogue between characters rendered uninteresting by bland designs and limited presence and impact. At 140-odd pages, the story feels rushed as well. I finished the whole thing on my lunch break with only a couple of frames really holding my attention for more than a few seconds. An honest-to-goodness adaptation with all the appeal of the original likely would have required multiple volumes or at least twice the amount of pages, to capture all the little moments that make the original so interesting. For me, the detail is what makes Dreamquest standout as a rare (because Lovecraft didn't write much pure-fantasy) and unique (because I don't know of too many other stories in which an army of house-cats battles a gelatinous alien-race on the moon) bit of Lovecraftian fantasy, and when you scale that back, all you get is a story about a guy going on a quest in an unremarkable fantasy world, and there's plenty of stories like that around. Not a terrible graphic novel as far as graphic novels go, and I admit I'm being a bit of a hard-ass here because I love the source material, but it's a disappointing adaptation that I'd have trouble recommending to anyone for any reason other than completing one's collection of Lovecraftian paraphernalia.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zare

    I have to admit that I never heard of this story before so this adaptation was my first-read of it. Entire story is told through dreams. Our intrepid hero tries to find the unknown magnificent city and in order to find it he tries to contact mysterious and dangerous creatures who are keepers of the distant frontiers. Story itself aged well and even today resonates very well. While watching our protagonist discussing the events with his friend about their quests and adventures one can draw parallel I have to admit that I never heard of this story before so this adaptation was my first-read of it. Entire story is told through dreams. Our intrepid hero tries to find the unknown magnificent city and in order to find it he tries to contact mysterious and dangerous creatures who are keepers of the distant frontiers. Story itself aged well and even today resonates very well. While watching our protagonist discussing the events with his friend about their quests and adventures one can draw parallels with the modern day computer game players, people finding more sense and enjoyment in distant worlds where they become whomever they want and do whatever they want. They might not dream in the true sense of the word but they are definitely living in their own worlds. If you ask me this story is cyberpunk to the core, only element missing are techno-gadgets. Art is great and truly manages to depict the otherworldliness of dreams and dream-like experiences. Truly great adaptation. It begs the question do we dream of things or is our very existence (and our dreams) just echo of another dreamer. So Inception-like... Highly recommended.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    I think this might be the first adaptation of HPL in any medium that I've actually liked. The illustrations are quite suitable, right down to making Carter look like a somewhat more butch and buff version of the author himself. It's been too long since I read the original to speak to the accuracy of the text, though I do suspect that some of the more problematically racist bits were left out, toned down, or rewritten. Anyway, this one bodes well for the rest of the adaptor's series, so I'll keep I think this might be the first adaptation of HPL in any medium that I've actually liked. The illustrations are quite suitable, right down to making Carter look like a somewhat more butch and buff version of the author himself. It's been too long since I read the original to speak to the accuracy of the text, though I do suspect that some of the more problematically racist bits were left out, toned down, or rewritten. Anyway, this one bodes well for the rest of the adaptor's series, so I'll keep pursuing it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Swjohnson

    I.N.J. Culbard’s graphic novel of H.P. Lovecraft’s “Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath” is ambitious, to say the least. The original 1926-27 novella, a dense, Lord Dunsany-influenced near-psychedelic dream travelogue, offers unique challenges: baroque descriptions that somehow defy precise visuals, a rambling story-line, and narrative logic more appropriate to dream-life than the printed page. At its best, it’s fantasy in its purest sense, with many sustained sequences of surreal wonder. Culbard tack I.N.J. Culbard’s graphic novel of H.P. Lovecraft’s “Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath” is ambitious, to say the least. The original 1926-27 novella, a dense, Lord Dunsany-influenced near-psychedelic dream travelogue, offers unique challenges: baroque descriptions that somehow defy precise visuals, a rambling story-line, and narrative logic more appropriate to dream-life than the printed page. At its best, it’s fantasy in its purest sense, with many sustained sequences of surreal wonder. Culbard tackles this seemingly impossible project by grounding the tale in compelling artwork and earthbound dialogue, often telling the story through wordless, evocative panels. Recommended for Lovecraft fans and graphic novel enthusiasts alike.

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Y

    I admit that I haven't read the Lovecraft original version, but I can't help but feel like there's a lot missing. The bones are there describing the sequence of events, but I didn't get that Lovecraft "experience." I suppose I'm not sure that a graphic format will ever do Lovecraft justice simply because the imagination he leaves us with is always going to be more horrific than an artist's rendering. I admit that I haven't read the Lovecraft original version, but I can't help but feel like there's a lot missing. The bones are there describing the sequence of events, but I didn't get that Lovecraft "experience." I suppose I'm not sure that a graphic format will ever do Lovecraft justice simply because the imagination he leaves us with is always going to be more horrific than an artist's rendering.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Damian Herde

    While the prose original is long and often rambling, I still enjoy it and the many Easter eggs it contains linking back to many of Lovecraft’s earlier works. This graphic adaptation is a quick read, yet still hits the key story beats. There are obviously a number of omissions and additions from the original in order to condense the story down. I enjoyed the art style, for the most part, although it can get a little impressionistic at times.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Social_Sloth

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Randolph Carter visits the Dream World in his dreams, where he tries to find the sunset city. This quest brings him on journeys around the Dream World and he makes both enemies and allies. Cats of Ulthar are by far the coolest allies he's got. In the end he finds that the sunset city of his dreams was much closer than he thought. Randolph Carter visits the Dream World in his dreams, where he tries to find the sunset city. This quest brings him on journeys around the Dream World and he makes both enemies and allies. Cats of Ulthar are by far the coolest allies he's got. In the end he finds that the sunset city of his dreams was much closer than he thought.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    Culbard does well visually adapting Lovecraft and other horror writers' stories. I thought he captured all of the important beats from Lovecraft's Dreamlands and there were plenty from the original story to choose from. My familiarity with Lovecraft's story filled in any gaps there may have been in this adaptation. Culbard does well visually adapting Lovecraft and other horror writers' stories. I thought he captured all of the important beats from Lovecraft's Dreamlands and there were plenty from the original story to choose from. My familiarity with Lovecraft's story filled in any gaps there may have been in this adaptation.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark Redman

    I N J Culbard has adapted quite a number of Lovecraft stories and turned them into graphic novels. For the most part, they have been excellent adaptations. I always felt that adapting Dream Quest was going to be difficult. To try and capture the essence of the story, interpret Lovecraft’s dream vision is almost impossible. For me, Culbard kind of pulls it off, just a little. Whilst the majority of the story is present, it just wasn’t enough, it feels more like a number of separate episodes edite I N J Culbard has adapted quite a number of Lovecraft stories and turned them into graphic novels. For the most part, they have been excellent adaptations. I always felt that adapting Dream Quest was going to be difficult. To try and capture the essence of the story, interpret Lovecraft’s dream vision is almost impossible. For me, Culbard kind of pulls it off, just a little. Whilst the majority of the story is present, it just wasn’t enough, it feels more like a number of separate episodes edited together. That said, what we have is enough to be entertained. Although I've given this 4* it's really 3.5*.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    It's a good adaptation. Art's simple but effective, and the story's been updated, incorporating relevant bits of other HPL stories to make it hold together, and strengthen the theme of nostalgia. On the whole, yes. It's a good adaptation. Art's simple but effective, and the story's been updated, incorporating relevant bits of other HPL stories to make it hold together, and strengthen the theme of nostalgia. On the whole, yes.

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