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Drone Warfare

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Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2015 One of the most significant and controversial developments in contemporary warfare is the use of unmanned aerial vehicles, commonly referred to as drones. In the last decade, US drone strikes have more than doubled and their deployment is transforming the way wars are fought across the globe. But how did drones claim such an import Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2015 One of the most significant and controversial developments in contemporary warfare is the use of unmanned aerial vehicles, commonly referred to as drones. In the last decade, US drone strikes have more than doubled and their deployment is transforming the way wars are fought across the globe. But how did drones claim such an important role in modern military planning? And how are they changing military strategy and the ethics of war and peace? What standards might effectively limit their use? Should there even be a limit? Drone warfare is the first book to engage fully with the political, legal, and ethical dimensions of UAVs. In it, political scientist Sarah Kreps and philosopher John Kaag discuss the extraordinary expansion of drone programs from the Cold War to the present day and their so-called �effectiveness� in conflict zones. Analysing the political implications of drone technology for foreign and domestic policy as well as public opinion, the authors go on to examine the strategic position of the United States - by far the world�s most prolific employer of drones - to argue that US military supremacy could be used to enshrine a new set of international agreements and treaties aimed at controlling the use of UAVs in the future.


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Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2015 One of the most significant and controversial developments in contemporary warfare is the use of unmanned aerial vehicles, commonly referred to as drones. In the last decade, US drone strikes have more than doubled and their deployment is transforming the way wars are fought across the globe. But how did drones claim such an import Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2015 One of the most significant and controversial developments in contemporary warfare is the use of unmanned aerial vehicles, commonly referred to as drones. In the last decade, US drone strikes have more than doubled and their deployment is transforming the way wars are fought across the globe. But how did drones claim such an important role in modern military planning? And how are they changing military strategy and the ethics of war and peace? What standards might effectively limit their use? Should there even be a limit? Drone warfare is the first book to engage fully with the political, legal, and ethical dimensions of UAVs. In it, political scientist Sarah Kreps and philosopher John Kaag discuss the extraordinary expansion of drone programs from the Cold War to the present day and their so-called �effectiveness� in conflict zones. Analysing the political implications of drone technology for foreign and domestic policy as well as public opinion, the authors go on to examine the strategic position of the United States - by far the world�s most prolific employer of drones - to argue that US military supremacy could be used to enshrine a new set of international agreements and treaties aimed at controlling the use of UAVs in the future.

47 review for Drone Warfare

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael Burnam-Fink

    Kaag and Kreps provide a solid introduction to the interactions between drones and Just War Theory, using a philosophical perspective to illuminate the moral costs of armed drones, particularly as used by the United States during the past decade of the War on Terror. This book is good for what it is-but it's a conventional reading that is in my opinion (as somebody who has written on this extensively) hobbled by the built-in blinders of Just War Theory: that military actions should be restricted Kaag and Kreps provide a solid introduction to the interactions between drones and Just War Theory, using a philosophical perspective to illuminate the moral costs of armed drones, particularly as used by the United States during the past decade of the War on Terror. This book is good for what it is-but it's a conventional reading that is in my opinion (as somebody who has written on this extensively) hobbled by the built-in blinders of Just War Theory: that military actions should be restricted in the name of universal ethics and justice, that States are responsible to the will of their population, that ethical deliberation informs and improves policy. Their argument is moderate, reasonable, pragmatic, and impotent compared to, say John Oliver's argument that "drones are making people afraid of the sky." The Obama and Bush Administrations have been very careful in making sure that their policies adhere to Just War legal principles, and as such arguments centered on the ethics of Just War basically mirror the political positions of opposing camps on the validity of recent American military adventurism. The book that I'd like to see would discuss the operations, tactics, and power of drone warfare. This is not that book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Mcquirk

    This is an excellent book on the issues surrounding the use of drones in warfare, and in targeted killings. The authors establish a solid argument about the moral and ethical issues with the US policies, and how it establishes a moral hazard. This book is a great primer for those wanting to become more informed about the moral and ethical issues on drone warfare.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

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    Eric

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    Libraries Trocaire

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    Chaosdroid

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    Graham Atkins

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    adnan

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    Andrew

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    Juliet Hayes

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