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It's Not About Sex

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It's Not About Sex is the story of a sizzling love triangle that starts with a slow burn and builds to a thrilling and deadly climax. As America's richest and most successful contemporary painter, Leonard Hirsh has everything a man could want - fame, wealth, and a beautiful young wife. When he learns of a gifted artist, Ray Martin, painting in a solitary prison cell, Lenni It's Not About Sex is the story of a sizzling love triangle that starts with a slow burn and builds to a thrilling and deadly climax. As America's richest and most successful contemporary painter, Leonard Hirsh has everything a man could want - fame, wealth, and a beautiful young wife. When he learns of a gifted artist, Ray Martin, painting in a solitary prison cell, Lennie uses all his influence to have Ray paroled into his care. He then risks his own reputation by introducing the talented young ex-con into the New York City art world, to instant acclaim. He also brings Ray into his personal life, providing a guest house on the Hirsh's grand country estate, Schoolcross, which was the inheritance of his wife, the former Nora Van Leuyden Longworth. Lennie and Nora live in the Schoolcross big house in eccentric splendor, surrounded by their entourage of friends, employees, and hangers-on who inhabit the nearby cottages, enjoying the riches flowing from Lennie's enormous financial success. The story is narrated by James Bradley, an art dealer who shares the Schoolcross guest house with Ray. Bradley's access to Ray, Nora, and Lennie gives him an inside look at the drama that builds from the moment Ray is released from prison until the searing finish. Librarian's Note: Alternative cover issue for 0615820891 (ISBN13: 9780615820897)


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It's Not About Sex is the story of a sizzling love triangle that starts with a slow burn and builds to a thrilling and deadly climax. As America's richest and most successful contemporary painter, Leonard Hirsh has everything a man could want - fame, wealth, and a beautiful young wife. When he learns of a gifted artist, Ray Martin, painting in a solitary prison cell, Lenni It's Not About Sex is the story of a sizzling love triangle that starts with a slow burn and builds to a thrilling and deadly climax. As America's richest and most successful contemporary painter, Leonard Hirsh has everything a man could want - fame, wealth, and a beautiful young wife. When he learns of a gifted artist, Ray Martin, painting in a solitary prison cell, Lennie uses all his influence to have Ray paroled into his care. He then risks his own reputation by introducing the talented young ex-con into the New York City art world, to instant acclaim. He also brings Ray into his personal life, providing a guest house on the Hirsh's grand country estate, Schoolcross, which was the inheritance of his wife, the former Nora Van Leuyden Longworth. Lennie and Nora live in the Schoolcross big house in eccentric splendor, surrounded by their entourage of friends, employees, and hangers-on who inhabit the nearby cottages, enjoying the riches flowing from Lennie's enormous financial success. The story is narrated by James Bradley, an art dealer who shares the Schoolcross guest house with Ray. Bradley's access to Ray, Nora, and Lennie gives him an inside look at the drama that builds from the moment Ray is released from prison until the searing finish. Librarian's Note: Alternative cover issue for 0615820891 (ISBN13: 9780615820897)

43 review for It's Not About Sex

  1. 5 out of 5

    David Kalergis

    A NOTE FROM THE AUTHOR: When Norman Mailer championed the release of prison writer Jack Abbott in the mid-1980s, I was intrigued. What hubris on the part of Mailer! And when Abbott killed someone shortly after his release, I was appalled, imagining the effects of this nightmare on the lives of everyone involved. The story fascinated me, and for several years I researched the whole affair with the idea of someday writing a book about it. Over time, life inflicted its own vagaries on me, leading t A NOTE FROM THE AUTHOR: When Norman Mailer championed the release of prison writer Jack Abbott in the mid-1980s, I was intrigued. What hubris on the part of Mailer! And when Abbott killed someone shortly after his release, I was appalled, imagining the effects of this nightmare on the lives of everyone involved. The story fascinated me, and for several years I researched the whole affair with the idea of someday writing a book about it. Over time, life inflicted its own vagaries on me, leading to a rethinking of the story, which shifted into a highly fictionalized version set in the contemporary art world of New York. It's Not About Sex is the result. For those who might be interested in the inner structures that guided the evolution of the book, I found that five interwoven themes developed during its writing. The first is the unintended consequences which spring from a decision guided by hubris, especially when that decision impinges on essential elements of another person's experience of the human condition. (Lennie's decision to free Ray and champion his work, despite Ray's past history of violence.) The second theme is the difficulties that a man will encounter when trying to influence his own fate or change the fate of another. (The obstacles which arise from Lennie's desire to rescue Ray from his life in prison, and Ray's struggle with his apparently inborn violent nature.) The third is the inability of humans to discern the real truth as it unfolds in front of them. (What is Lennie trying to accomplish by freeing Ray and bringing him into his home? Is Ray's violence truly self-defense? Why does Nora behave so coldly towards Ray? What is at the heart of Bradley marital dilemma? ) The fourth theme is the all-consuming influence on human behavior of the sex drive, especially its individual idiosyncratic manifestations, even when it is masked or unrecognized by those in its grip. (Thus, the novel's provocative title, It's Not About Sex.) The fifth theme is the redemptive power of forgiveness, even in the face of the unforgivable. Interested readers are invited to contact me. David Kalergis. [email protected]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Olson

    First I like to point out the good. I enjoyed the plot of this book a lot. I also thought that the point of view character was great in that he had his own problems while trying to resolve other people's problems. There were many typos and grammatical issues. Not real bad, but it certainly would benefit from another edit. The biggest issue for me is all the painstaking detail in this book. Too often I found myself slogging through a bunch of description and then wondering what I just read. I misse First I like to point out the good. I enjoyed the plot of this book a lot. I also thought that the point of view character was great in that he had his own problems while trying to resolve other people's problems. There were many typos and grammatical issues. Not real bad, but it certainly would benefit from another edit. The biggest issue for me is all the painstaking detail in this book. Too often I found myself slogging through a bunch of description and then wondering what I just read. I missed several things until I was reminded of it later when the subject is discussed again (I also don't like the repetition). More dialog and/or some humor earlier on in addition to cutting out all the unneeded detail would have helped tremendously. I'm also bothered by Ray's motives. I think the author only went half way with Ray's character. Either he should have been a full psychopath or not. There is a lot of interpretation going on here by the viewpoint character and we never find out for sure what his motives are. I think the ending would have made more sense if we had this. Speaking of the ending, readers should really get an answer to the question at hand about the employment opportunity (sorry I am vague here, I don't want to spoil the ending). It is such a minute point that it shouldn't be left as a cliffhanger.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I think this book is a hidden gem. I love to read good fiction, including the classics, and it's unusual to find a really enjoyable modern book that aspires to a higher standard than vampires. The premise in this one is very clever -- a famous artist discovers a younger artist serving time in prison. The older artist secures the release of the younger and takes him under his wing, both in the art world of New York and on his palatial country estate. The sub-title, A Tale of Friendship, Betrayal, I think this book is a hidden gem. I love to read good fiction, including the classics, and it's unusual to find a really enjoyable modern book that aspires to a higher standard than vampires. The premise in this one is very clever -- a famous artist discovers a younger artist serving time in prison. The older artist secures the release of the younger and takes him under his wing, both in the art world of New York and on his palatial country estate. The sub-title, A Tale of Friendship, Betrayal, Adultery and Murder, is quite descriptive, but doesn't do justice to the mounting build-up leading to a really exciting climax. As the book neared its end, I found myself leaning further and further forward in my chair, and when it was over I was completely satisfied by the ending. It took me a while to figure out the title, but when it dawned on me what it meant I couldn't stop laughing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ian Mcabe

    It's Not About Sex was a terrific read. It was recommended to me by a friend last week, who gave me his paperback copy. The story starts a bit slowly, but really builds up, until finally I couldn't put it down. I particularly like the ending. Not your usual piece of genre fiction, I can recommend this one to booklovers who like a really intelligent story but also want to be entertained. It's Not About Sex was a terrific read. It was recommended to me by a friend last week, who gave me his paperback copy. The story starts a bit slowly, but really builds up, until finally I couldn't put it down. I particularly like the ending. Not your usual piece of genre fiction, I can recommend this one to booklovers who like a really intelligent story but also want to be entertained.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Copeland

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Wilkinson

  7. 4 out of 5

    Roy Huff

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mary Morony

  9. 4 out of 5

    Estee

  10. 5 out of 5

    Farina Mughal

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mick Brookes

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  14. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  15. 4 out of 5

    Traci Hearty

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kim Hathorn

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rosanna

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ebony

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Adkins

  21. 5 out of 5

    Terri Broome

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Klocinski

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kim McHughes

  25. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Carnes

  26. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Hall

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Torres

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kim Coomey

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mandy Dobarro

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gabby Kol

  31. 5 out of 5

    Tosha Holliman

  32. 5 out of 5

    Tony Parsons

  33. 4 out of 5

    Frank Martorana

  34. 4 out of 5

    B

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer johnson

  36. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

  37. 4 out of 5

    Katheline

  38. 4 out of 5

    nancy

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jill Edwards

  40. 5 out of 5

    Hollie Secrest

  41. 4 out of 5

    George Larrabee

  42. 5 out of 5

    Linda Rudmann

  43. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Woolems

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