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From New York Times bestselling author L.E. Modesitt comes Heritage of Cyador, the new novel in the Saga of Recluce. Scarcely a year after the events of Cyador’s Heirs, Lerial uses his mastery of Order and Chaos, the competing natural forces that shape his world and define the magic that exists within it, to utterly destroy an Afritan military force crossing into Cigoerne. F From New York Times bestselling author L.E. Modesitt comes Heritage of Cyador, the new novel in the Saga of Recluce. Scarcely a year after the events of Cyador’s Heirs, Lerial uses his mastery of Order and Chaos, the competing natural forces that shape his world and define the magic that exists within it, to utterly destroy an Afritan military force crossing into Cigoerne. Five years later, Lerial, now an overcaptain and a field commander of Cigoerne’s Mirror Lancers, must lead three companies of troops into Afrit on a mission of mutual interest: neighboring Heldya is threatening to invade Afrit, and if that nation falls, Cigoerne is certain to be next. The mission is both delicate and dangerous; Lerial’s value in the effort to repelling Heldya is undeniable, but his troubled history against Afrit may reopen old wounds that will never truly heal.


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From New York Times bestselling author L.E. Modesitt comes Heritage of Cyador, the new novel in the Saga of Recluce. Scarcely a year after the events of Cyador’s Heirs, Lerial uses his mastery of Order and Chaos, the competing natural forces that shape his world and define the magic that exists within it, to utterly destroy an Afritan military force crossing into Cigoerne. F From New York Times bestselling author L.E. Modesitt comes Heritage of Cyador, the new novel in the Saga of Recluce. Scarcely a year after the events of Cyador’s Heirs, Lerial uses his mastery of Order and Chaos, the competing natural forces that shape his world and define the magic that exists within it, to utterly destroy an Afritan military force crossing into Cigoerne. Five years later, Lerial, now an overcaptain and a field commander of Cigoerne’s Mirror Lancers, must lead three companies of troops into Afrit on a mission of mutual interest: neighboring Heldya is threatening to invade Afrit, and if that nation falls, Cigoerne is certain to be next. The mission is both delicate and dangerous; Lerial’s value in the effort to repelling Heldya is undeniable, but his troubled history against Afrit may reopen old wounds that will never truly heal.

30 review for Heritage of Cyador

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    I'm eating up these Recluse books like no one's business. Why? Because they make me feel good. It surprises me every single time. I mean, I don't generally pick up an epic fantasy tome that's full of bloody battles, tactics, strategy, and massive magical explosions only to expect a sense of balance and well-being afterward. Being energized rather than drained by the ennui of the horror of war. But I am energized. Why? Partly because of the familiarity of a gentle formula, but mostly because the m I'm eating up these Recluse books like no one's business. Why? Because they make me feel good. It surprises me every single time. I mean, I don't generally pick up an epic fantasy tome that's full of bloody battles, tactics, strategy, and massive magical explosions only to expect a sense of balance and well-being afterward. Being energized rather than drained by the ennui of the horror of war. But I am energized. Why? Partly because of the familiarity of a gentle formula, but mostly because the main characters are almost always amazingly well-balanced, careful, honest, and full of deep reserves of that sense of RIGHTNESS. This book continues the story of Lerial from book 17, now pretty accomplished as a warrior-mage, but now sent to a neighboring kingdom to help out with some sticky diplomatic issues. Suffice to say, it gets very sticky. And a LOT of people die. And I loved every single second of it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Another excellent addition to the Recluce series. Full of action & great characters, Modesitt explores the economics of power, a theme that is especially interesting when considered in the light of scientific research funding in our current political climate. What happens when the government can't afford the wizards, only the private companies? What can be done about it? It's a fantasy novel full of swords & wizards, so don't expect a perfect match, but it does raise some interesting lines of th Another excellent addition to the Recluce series. Full of action & great characters, Modesitt explores the economics of power, a theme that is especially interesting when considered in the light of scientific research funding in our current political climate. What happens when the government can't afford the wizards, only the private companies? What can be done about it? It's a fantasy novel full of swords & wizards, so don't expect a perfect match, but it does raise some interesting lines of thought. I pre-ordered this book & didn't pay much attention to the shipping notification. I should have. It turned out to be a Sunday delivery even way out in my neck of the woods. That's pretty cool, but I could have started reading this a day earlier had I known. I would have, too. I've been reading Modesitt's books since I found "The Fires of Paratime" (republished as The Timegod) back in the late 70's. While I've certainly liked some books better than others, I've finished every one & reread most several times. I've read the Recluce series since it first came out, read each book in published order & most of the series in chronological order as well. You should read Cyador's Heirs first, but probably don't need to read the rest of the series before this book. It will stand alone pretty well, too. That said, I can't recommend the entire series highly enough. Per Modesitt, it should be read in published order, but rereads in chronological order are great. If you're looking for high adventure & gore, you won't find it in his books. While there is plenty of violence, it's not graphic. He tends to concentrate more on the effects. His worlds are amazingly complex, logical, & adhere to strict economic conditions. IOW, they're incredibly believable no matter how far out. His blog is worth reading, too.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Oi! I found this book randomly. Only after buying it did I realize that this is the bloody 18th book in some massive series. Dude. But, I figured if this is a series I am going to try I might as well see what this book is about. Well I liked it. Yes, there are parts of the story that are a wee bit confusing (the way the magic system works; the fascination with "Cyador"; the politics of Kierdon family, etc.) but the overall story works quite well. I figured if I enjoyed a story this "far along", I Oi! I found this book randomly. Only after buying it did I realize that this is the bloody 18th book in some massive series. Dude. But, I figured if this is a series I am going to try I might as well see what this book is about. Well I liked it. Yes, there are parts of the story that are a wee bit confusing (the way the magic system works; the fascination with "Cyador"; the politics of Kierdon family, etc.) but the overall story works quite well. I figured if I enjoyed a story this "far along", I'll likely enjoy the books that came before. Now for the plot: Lerial, the second son of the Duke of Kierdon, has been sent to Afrit to help with an invasion from Haldyans. Lerial leads his Mirror Lancers and uses his magic to fight the invaders. Along with the invaders, there is also trouble with the powerful and wealthy merchant class. All of which serves for an interesting and entertaining read. While the military affairs are never that complicated-anything that appears is generally incinerated by Lerial, who gets headaches and then passes out-wakes up, eats some bread and drinks some lager...that's about it. A bit strange but interesting. The politics? It is a low grade level of complexity. Perhaps the most interesting was which merchant house was most culpable. The family politics I found boring and didn't really care about the "relationship" angle. But, this whole "Cyador" setting seems to be interesting. Do I have a burning desire to run out and grab 18 books to read? Lol. No. But, I will keep my eye open for the first book and slowly start working my way through this series. A credit that even 18 books in, the story is interesting enough. I admit I missed many subtleties and, thus, will try reading the series. I think a fan of exciting fantasy with battles and some politics will enjoy this series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    This comes right after Cyador's Heirs & follows Lerial on his further adventures to keep his country safe. Again, it's well narrated with a wonderful ending to wrap up this duology. Definitely read 'Heirs' first. This is book 6 chronologically, but the 17th published (6C, 17P). The full list of books in chronological order is in my review here. This comes right after Cyador's Heirs & follows Lerial on his further adventures to keep his country safe. Again, it's well narrated with a wonderful ending to wrap up this duology. Definitely read 'Heirs' first. This is book 6 chronologically, but the 17th published (6C, 17P). The full list of books in chronological order is in my review here.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Brown

    We return again to the life of Lerial, refugee grey mage of the lost city of Cyad now making his home with his family on the continent of Hamor. This story picks up four or five years after the end of the first part of his story and the most immediate noticeable thing is that he suddenly doesn't whine so much any more. This whining does return near the end of the story as part of the romance sub plot but it's noticeable lack was somewhat jarring since it was a huge component of the character mak We return again to the life of Lerial, refugee grey mage of the lost city of Cyad now making his home with his family on the continent of Hamor. This story picks up four or five years after the end of the first part of his story and the most immediate noticeable thing is that he suddenly doesn't whine so much any more. This whining does return near the end of the story as part of the romance sub plot but it's noticeable lack was somewhat jarring since it was a huge component of the character makeup in the first story of Lerial. Lerial, as the second son of the Duke of their colony city, is quickly forced into a situation supporting a neighboring kingdom against a common enemy and proves his mettle in battles there. The best part of this book are the battle scenes. They are well written and the military intrigues take a back seat to the progress of the war itself. As usual for one of Modessitt's heroes Lerial finds himself further and further enmeshed in the complexities of life and in this case death. Another change that really stood out was the sudden lack of interest in training both personally and with his military units. What was once critical and a constant part of the characters makeup is now ignored until one lone sparing session near the end of the book. Another issues I had with this book was the romance subplot. It was loudly telegraphed but rushed when it came to the end. But my real problem is that for such a supposedly clever hero Lerial never saw the obvious solution that the author eventually brought the book too. I have a hard time imagining that the solution never occurred to him at all, but instead it was used for a chance for the whining attitude "oh woe is me I'm the wrong son" to return. This is what largely kept me from rating this story any higher. I am tempted to think there may be another story in this mini-series with Lerial since the continent of Hamor is still suffering from major political divides but I don't know. In any case I will continue on with reading the currently published Recluse novels in internal chronological order. One thing of note is that this book (in the chronological order of things) is the first one to actually mention the island of Recluse. It was an off hand comment by one character about the "desert of Recluse" and how someone could go there to disappear or escape the world.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Liviu

    sequel (and concluding volume with a definite ending) to Cyador's heirs starting some years later and following Lerial now getting to his full powers as a mage as he has to undertake a diplomatic mission to assist Cigoerne's neighbor and lesser foe Afrit, against the major threat of the Duke of Heldya; There is a lot of history there as detailed in the prologue as well as in the earlier book, so Lerial doesn't quite know who are his enemies, the barbarous Heldyans who can seemingly throw tens of sequel (and concluding volume with a definite ending) to Cyador's heirs starting some years later and following Lerial now getting to his full powers as a mage as he has to undertake a diplomatic mission to assist Cigoerne's neighbor and lesser foe Afrit, against the major threat of the Duke of Heldya; There is a lot of history there as detailed in the prologue as well as in the earlier book, so Lerial doesn't quite know who are his enemies, the barbarous Heldyans who can seemingly throw tens of thousands of soldiers against Afrit or Cigoerne, the Afritan commanders, some of whom know that a few years back Lerial mercilessly destroyed an Afritan battalion who tried to invade Cigoerne to recapture some refugees, the Afritan merchants whose greed of gold and power may induce them to treason and actually welcome the Heldyan conquerors to be, the Afritan duke Atroyan who is mercurial, weak and whose rule is unstable or the powerful Afritan arms commander, Rhemuel, the duke's younger brother who has secret ties with Lerial's own family. This novel is vintage LE Modesitt, a page turner end to end and has everything one wants from a fantasy. Again many more similarities with the Imager series rather than the earlier Recluce books and a great read overall, as good as the Quaeryt or Rhenn books as now there is no slow start or need for exposition like in the first Lerial book Intrigue, personal fights, battles of all kinds, assassinations, but also diplomacy, balls, romance, not to speak of superb world building and discovering a different culture through the eyes of our hero. Highly, highly recommended and a top 10 book of mine for the year

  7. 4 out of 5

    William Bentrim

    Heritage of Cyador by L.E. Modesitt, jr This is a continuation of the Recluce series, number eighteen to be exact. Cyador's Heirs the previous book established Lerial as a major player in the saga. Lerial takes his protection of Cigoerne to Afrit, the much larger neighboring nation in this book. His defense of his homeland takes a surprising turn. I have noted before in his other books, Modesitt infuses political commentary and philosophy as part of his story line. Time Gods World, The Forever He Heritage of Cyador by L.E. Modesitt, jr This is a continuation of the Recluce series, number eighteen to be exact. Cyador's Heirs the previous book established Lerial as a major player in the saga. Lerial takes his protection of Cigoerne to Afrit, the much larger neighboring nation in this book. His defense of his homeland takes a surprising turn. I have noted before in his other books, Modesitt infuses political commentary and philosophy as part of his story line. Time Gods World, The Forever Hero and Order Master all illustrate philosophic musings. There are times where the author seems to pontificate a bit but it always fits the story line. This book is no exception. Mercantile distaste could be a subtitle. Modesitt seems to have strong philosophic threads throughout his books. Again, probably repeating myself, the author takes a great deal of time building the scene before he introduces action. In some ways that mirrors reality as constant action isn't even prevalent in a war zone. The common thread, as I stated in previous Modesitt reviews is the lone soul fighting for self identity in a harsh world. Lerial finds a new friend and mentor as well as allies in surprising places. I highly recommend. Body of work of L.E. Modesitt Site: http://www.lemodesittjr.com/

  8. 5 out of 5

    Seregil of Rhiminee

    Originally published at Risingshadow. Heritage of Cyador is a continuation of Lerial's story that started in Cyador's Heirs. It will please fans of L. E. Modesitt, Jr.'s Saga of Recluce, because it's an entertaining combination of adult fantasy, worldbuilding and complex issues ranging from diplomacy and politics to assassinations and military action. Before I begin to analyze the contents of this novel, I'll briefly mention that L. E. Modesitt, Jr.'s Saga of Recluce is almost like a guilty pleasu Originally published at Risingshadow. Heritage of Cyador is a continuation of Lerial's story that started in Cyador's Heirs. It will please fans of L. E. Modesitt, Jr.'s Saga of Recluce, because it's an entertaining combination of adult fantasy, worldbuilding and complex issues ranging from diplomacy and politics to assassinations and military action. Before I begin to analyze the contents of this novel, I'll briefly mention that L. E. Modesitt, Jr.'s Saga of Recluce is almost like a guilty pleasure of mine, because I love Recluce novels. I've been a fan of this fantasy series for a few years now and I still find the new Recluce novels as intriguing as the earlier novels. In my opinion the Recluce novels are among the best fantasy novels available for readers who are interested in entertaining and well written fantasy for adults that focuses realistically - and also philosophically - on characterization, magic, worldbuilding, politics and military issues. I think it's good to mention that it is advisable to read Cyador's Heirs before reading this novel. Because Cyador's Heirs and Heritage of Cyador form a duology, it's good to know about what has happened in the previous novel before reading this novel. Although Heritage of Cyador is the 18th novel in the Saga of Recluce, it's a quality novel. It's an entertaining fantasy novel that deserves to be read by fans of the series and also by newcomers to the series. There are many fantasy series in which the newest novels are clearly weaker than the earlier novels, but not in this case, because Heritage of Cyador is good and well written fantasy for adult readers. It shares a few common elements with the previous Recluce novels and it offers good escapism for readers. In my opinion Heritage of Cyador is one of the best novels the author has written to date. Cyador's Heirs was a set-up story for this sequel. It was Lerial's coming of age story, because the author concentrated on writing about Lerial's training and how he gained experience. Heritage of Cyador continues Lerial's story in a fascinating way, because in this novel the author concentrates of writing about how Lerial uses his power and what kind of political happenings take place (the author writes about how Lerial uses his magic, military skills, political skills and diplomacy in different ways). Here's a bit of information about the story: At the beginning of this novel Lerial uses his powers of Order and Chaos to fully destroy an Afritan military force that is crossing into Cigoerne. A few years later Lerial is still a bit shaken by what he had to do and wishes not to use the same kind of destructive power again. Lerial is promoted to an overcaptain. Soon Lerial has to go on a mission. This mission is both delicate and dangerous, because Lerial has to assist Cigoerne's neighbour and lesser foe, Afrit, against the threat coming from Heldya... The characters in this novel are fully fleshed out and realistic. Lerial in particular is an exceptionally well portrayed, richly drawn and interesting character who has his own problems. I think that Lerial's character will appeal to many fantasy readers, because the author writes fascinatingly about his life, work and family (Lerial has to deal with Afritans, Heldyans, merchanters and officers etc, so he has a lot on his hands and doesn't really know who his enemies are). It was also interesting to read about the other characters, including Arms-Commander Rhamuel, because the author wrote well about them and their actions. Character interaction works perfectly in this novel. The dialogues between the different characters are realistic and believable, because the author writes fluent dialogue. For example, when you take a look at how Lerial and Rhamuel communicate and how Lerial talks to Kyedra, you'll notice how easily the author writes about these scenes. I admire the L. E. Modesitt, Jr.'s way of writing about the happenings, because he pays lots of attention to details and the outcome of certain actions. One of the best things about this novel is that the author explores these things in a deeper and more intriguing way than many other authors. This novel can be seen as a good example of his writing skills, because he uses Lerial's character as a tool to explore power, politics and treachery in a rich and well created fantasy world. One of the reasons why I find this novel and its predecessor so compelling is that in both novels the author takes his time to introduce the characters to the readers. He also carefully builds the background for the happenings, which adds plenty of realism to the storyline. This kind of storytelling is sure to win the hearts of readers who appreciate to read fantasy novels in which the author doesn't hurry into action, but slowly builds a believable world with its own laws and politics. I like the way L. E. Modesitt, Jr. writes about politics and intrigue in this novel. Nothing feels forced, because political elements feel fresh and exciting. There are many authors who seem to struggle with these elements and tend to write either too heavily about politics or too lightly about it. Fortunately L. E. Modesitt, Jr. doesn't suffer from these problems, but writes about politics in an interesting - and surprisingly addictive - way (many authors could take a few lessons from him in this regard). I think it's worth mentioning that L. E. Modesitt, Jr. fluently combines politics, economics, conflicts and philosophy in this novel. All these elements can be found in varying degrees in this story. One of the best things about Heritage of Cyador and the previous novels in this saga is that many events relate to other times and places. This is one of the reasons why I appreciate this fantasy saga very much, because it's interesting to read about a fantasy world where past events have shaped the world to be what it is at the moment. L. E. Modesitt, Jr. handles such issues as death, grief, love and sadness in a surprisingly realistic way. When Lerial hears that someone close to him has died, the matters are handled well and delicately. The author takes great care not to dwell on these happenings, but describes them in a realistic way. The author is surprisingly observant and he makes excellent observations about the characters and their actions in this novel. He fluently describes what the characters do and how they feel about different things. In my opinion, the author writes perfectly about Lerial's feelings and actions concerning duty, honour and difficult choices. Heritage of Cyador offers an interesting glimpse into Afritan culture. As Lerial travel to Afrit, he learns more about the Afritans and their way of life. I enjoyed reading about the Afritans and their culture, because the worldbuilding is excellent. In my opinion L. E. Modesitt, Jr. is one of the best fantasy authors when it comes to writing about magic, because he writes about magic in a fascinating and realistic way. His vision of magic is original, captivating and memorable. There are many authors who have written about their own magic systems etc, but there's something about Modesitt, Jr.'s way of writing about magic that has always thrilled me. There are probably many readers out there who have never read any Recluce novels, so it's good to write a few words about the magic system in this series. In this fantasy series all matter is made of two competing forces called Order and Chaos. Certain people are capable of manipulating one or both of these forces. Lerial is a gray magician who can use both of these forces. If you're a fan of L. E. Modesitt, Jr.'s fantasy novels, you should read Heritage of Cyador as soon as possible, because it's a good fantasy novel. If you're a newcomer and know nothing about the world described in this series, you can easily get into the world by reading the previous novel (Cyador's Heirs) and this novel (you can easily find information about the fantasy world from the internet). These two novels form a duology that can be used as an excellent entry point to the Saga of Recluce. If you enjoy these two novels, I advise you to take a look at the other novels in this series, because they're good fantasy entertainment. Heritage of Cyador will keep you turning pages and it may even cause you a bit of sleep deprivation, because you'll hardly notice the passing of time when you read it, but reading it is worth losing a few hours of sleep. It's a satisfying read for fans of L. E. Modesitt, Jr., and it's a must-read for all fans of the Saga of Recluce. Good, enjoyable and well written fantasy entertainment and excellent escapism for adult readers!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mick

    I'm all for a rich a detailed story but this 2nd book is falling back into established Modesitt style. He spends a great deal of time on minor details and environmental descriptions. He attempts to advance the plot via vague dialogue inferring something that the reader has insufficient clues to figure out. Modesitt never really fills in the blanks until a big reveal somewhere. In light of these deficiencies he then takes a key event and turns it into a summary of the actual events. The summary i I'm all for a rich a detailed story but this 2nd book is falling back into established Modesitt style. He spends a great deal of time on minor details and environmental descriptions. He attempts to advance the plot via vague dialogue inferring something that the reader has insufficient clues to figure out. Modesitt never really fills in the blanks until a big reveal somewhere. In light of these deficiencies he then takes a key event and turns it into a summary of the actual events. The summary is not only an unlikely event but usually involves incredibly fortunate circumstances that would never happen in a million years even in most fantasy worlds. Modesitt continues to fall back on the emerging strengths and abilities of his protagonist who is reaching messianic proportions by the end of the story. He misses the chance to really lend excitement and flavor to the story by relying too heavily on the magical abilities of the protagonist who, against incredible odds, prevails against all opposition. All this while being an exemplary character with no moral faults whose mistakes are solely born of his youth and inexperience while being thrust to the fore of every event by those unwilling to defend themselves. Lastly Modesitt tends to be too overt in his moralizing of humanity. Nearly without exception, the protagonist,his family and those subjects within their sphere of influence seem to be of sound moral stock and behaving ideally. All other groups and races are so flawed as to be unable to accomplish anything of worth and destroy any legacy of worth left by their forebears.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jaz Primo

    This was an amazing sequel to "Cyador's Heirs"! It was another satisfying installment in the Saga of Recluce series by L. E. Modesitt, Jr. and it tied up questions, loose ends, and character development for Lerial, Over-captain in the Cigoerne Lancers. Lerial is sent north to the land of Afrit to assist Lord Atroyan at the invitation of Arms-Commander Rhamuel to repel invading powers from surrounding lands. There are unexpected and stirring developments surrounding Lerial's mission that help him This was an amazing sequel to "Cyador's Heirs"! It was another satisfying installment in the Saga of Recluce series by L. E. Modesitt, Jr. and it tied up questions, loose ends, and character development for Lerial, Over-captain in the Cigoerne Lancers. Lerial is sent north to the land of Afrit to assist Lord Atroyan at the invitation of Arms-Commander Rhamuel to repel invading powers from surrounding lands. There are unexpected and stirring developments surrounding Lerial's mission that help him to further mature as a leader and a person, while also learning more about the Afritans who have most recently been viewed as antagonists of Cigoerne. I thoroughly enjoyed the rich setting that Mr. Modesitt once more immerses the reader into, including the complex machinations of both the merchant class and the military structures in Afrit. Lerial develops into the sort of reluctant hero that we might all hope to rise to, complete with humility and a caring approach to those around him. I highly recommend this novel, and I encourage anyone who has considered reading the Recluce series to go out and read every novel. The tangible and immersive world building that Modesitt presents is exemplary and wholly satisfying for any fantasy lover. I only hope that Mr. Modesitt has plans to revisit the world of Recluce sometime in the not too distant future.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    Satisfying conclusion to Lerial's story. The ending was wrapped up different than I expected through the two books, which I really enjoyed. Satisfying conclusion to Lerial's story. The ending was wrapped up different than I expected through the two books, which I really enjoyed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eamonn Murphy

    Heritage Of Cyador’ is the latest volume in L.E. Modesitt, Jr.‘s best selling ‘The Saga Of Recluce’. This now runs to eighteen volumes but they are generally separate stories covering different regions or time periods of the world imagined and most can be read individually or as pairs. It would be wise to read ‘Cyador’s Heirs’ before this one as it introduces our hero, Lerial, second son of Duke Kiedron of Cigoerne. In that book, he became a soldier and is proficient enough to slaughter an entire Heritage Of Cyador’ is the latest volume in L.E. Modesitt, Jr.‘s best selling ‘The Saga Of Recluce’. This now runs to eighteen volumes but they are generally separate stories covering different regions or time periods of the world imagined and most can be read individually or as pairs. It would be wise to read ‘Cyador’s Heirs’ before this one as it introduces our hero, Lerial, second son of Duke Kiedron of Cigoerne. In that book, he became a soldier and is proficient enough to slaughter an entire battalion of opposition by himself, using his mastery of Order and Chaos. The energy Chaos is kept in line by Order and Lerial can separate the two, virtually on the sub-atomic level, it seems. Substantial damage ensues. That happens in the prologue, so I’m not giving much away. A while later, he is dispatched with a small force to help the neighbouring land of Afrit fight off an attack by the other neighbouring land of Heldya. As the battalion Lerial killed was from Afrit, he is not sure of a warm welcome there, even though he’s come to help. It is in Cigoerne’s interests to stop Heldya conquering Afrit for the same reason it was in France’s interest to stop Germany conquering Poland. They would be next. Duke Atroyan rules Afrit, not well, but fortunately, his competent brother, Rhamuel, is in charge of the armed forces and that is the man with whom Lerial must deal with, at first. Following a small battle, there is a lull in the fighting and the story turns to more courtly proceedings, balls and dinners and the like. In the hands of another writer, this might have become dull but Modesitt manages to make the personalities intriguing and the conversations interesting. Then the Heldyans attack again and there are several other developments before this long book draws near its conclusion. As I’ve mentioned before, Modesitt shows great respect for soldiers and responsible leaders and also speaks highly of decent artisans and farmers but he has a very un-American attitude to business people or Merchanters as they are called in this one. For some reason, possibly based in real life today, the author seems to think that ‘Merchanters’ are only interested in gold and care little about anything or anyone else. He makes them seem almost selfish; even greedy. Our hero Lerial gets quite incensed about the fact that Afrit, more wealthy than Cigoerne and with a greater population, has been allowed to fall into a highly fragile and vulnerable state because its weak ruler, Duke Atroyan, listens only to one vested interest: Merchanters! The concentration of wealth into the hands of a few who thereby seek to control the government and make it serve their interests is perhaps relevant to the real world today. I couldn’t possibly comment. Uncle Geoff did a review on SFcrowsnest last month of ‘The Politics Of Big Fantasy’, an interesting idea for a book but it focused on ‘Star Wars’ (fair enough: republic versus empire is a political issue), ‘The Matrix’ and, rather weirdly, ‘The Avengers’ of Marvel Comics fame. The politics of the Avengers? It sounds like the subject of a dissertation by a particularly desperate sociology student. However, a sensible and interesting work could be made out of analysing the politics of Modesitt’s fantasy for politics, in the broader sense of how a society works, is often a rich theme in his work. In conclusion, I would like to say that this is the best volume I’ve read so far by Modesitt and I’ve read quite a few. His prose is always lucid and he has the knack of creating likeable heroes and dastardly villains while still being perfectly realistic. He never really hooks you on the first page but, after about a hundred pages, you are beset by a strong urge to keep reading. I have some criticisms of his moral position at times with regard to ruthlessness and ends justifying means, but I’m not at all sure he’s wrong in a hard, cruel world, especially lately. You really do have to read ‘Cyador’s Heirs’ before tackling this sequel but it’s good and this one is terrific. Recommended. Eamonn Murphy This review first appeared at https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patrick St-Denis

    A big fan of L. E. Modesitt, jr.'s Recluce saga for over two decades, it was with pleasure that I read the latest Recluce installment, Heritage of Cyador. This is the second volume in a two-part cycle chronicling the faith of the survivors of the fall of Cyador, having now re-established themselves in the small country of Cigoerne on the continent of Hamor. It begins just a few months following the events which marked the end of the previous novel, Cyador's Heirs. And as such, it's not a good ju A big fan of L. E. Modesitt, jr.'s Recluce saga for over two decades, it was with pleasure that I read the latest Recluce installment, Heritage of Cyador. This is the second volume in a two-part cycle chronicling the faith of the survivors of the fall of Cyador, having now re-established themselves in the small country of Cigoerne on the continent of Hamor. It begins just a few months following the events which marked the end of the previous novel, Cyador's Heirs. And as such, it's not a good jumping point for new readers wishing to get acquainted with the series. Indeed, this one is for long-time Recluce fans only. As was the case with its predecessor, Heritage of Cyador helps flesh out the societies of Hamor, focusing on the events and the people that left an indelible mark on the continent's history. On the other hand, in style and tone this second installment is more a military fantasy offering, what with the entire novel dealing with the threat of the Heldyan invasion and the repercussions a victory by the foreign monarch would have on both Afrit and Cigoerne. Here's the blurb: From New York Times bestselling author L.E. Modesitt comes Heritage of Cyador, the new novel in the Saga of Recluce. Scarcely a year after the events of Cyador’s Heirs, Lerial uses his mastery of Order and Chaos, the competing natural forces that shape his world and define the magic that exists within it, to utterly destroy an Afritan military force crossing into Cigoerne. Five years later, Lerial, now an overcaptain and a field commander of Cigoerne’s Mirror Lancers, must lead three companies of troops into Afrit on a mission of mutual interest: neighboring Heldya is threatening to invade Afrit, and if that nation falls, Cigoerne is certain to be next. The mission is both delicate and dangerous; Lerial’s value in the effort to repelling Heldya is undeniable, but his troubled history against Afrit may reopen old wounds that will never truly heal. Worldbuilding always plays a big role in any Recluce book and it's no different in this one. In Cyador's Heirs, I really enjoyed how Modesitt filled in the many blanks and elaborated on how the late Empress brought the surviving Mirror Lancers, the Magi'i, and other survivors into the last fireship and fled Cyador to establish themselves in what would one eventually become Cigoerne. Heritage of Cyador focuses on Lerial and his troops as they try to help stave off the Heldyan invasion without sacrifing too many of his men. Moreover, as the son of Duke Kiedron and a superior military commander in his own right, he must do his best not to ruffle any feathers, both among the Afritan officers and the members of the nobility. And yet, the more time he spends defending first Luba and then Swartheld, the more Lerial discovers that the wealthy merchanter class could well be the worst threat to Afrit, not Heldya. Amid betrayal and corruption allegations, it appears that all is lost and it's up to Lerial, a stranger in a strange land, to find a way to help turn the tide. The author continues to explore the relationship between Order and Chaos, one of the trademarks of this saga. Being able to manipulate both Order and Chaos forces Lerial to test the limits of what he can do, often with shocking results. With no one to teach him, Lerial, obviously a Gray Mage, must push himself like never before, and thus put his life on the line in an attempt to prevent Swartheld, and the rest of Afrit, from falling to the enemy. Unfortunately, we don't learn as much as I would have liked about Lerial's growing abilities. With overwhelming odds stacked against him at every turn, Lerial is forced to react and try to save himself and his men, often coming out of the ordeal with his own life hanging by a thread. In terms of characterization, Lerial understandably takes center stage. With feminism and the emancipation of women being two important Recluce themes, Haesychya, Duke Atroyan's Consort, and Kyedra, their daughter, also have big roles to play in this book. Emerya, a powerful Healer and Lerial's aunt, is another key protagonist. As far as the Afritan military is concerned, Rhamuel, Arms-Commander of Afrit, is the only one that truly stands out amidst all the corrupted or inept officers. Modesitt's books are never fast-paced affairs and Heritage of Cyador is no exception. The Recluce recipe is simple: you follow the main character as he or she must learn, experiment, and puzzle out ways to escape a number of predicaments before the finale. In that respect, the 18th volume in the saga follows Modesitt's Recluce recipe like its predecessors and long-time fans end up with a another satisfying read. Having said that, I must point out that you can pretty much see the end coming from the middle part of the novel. You can't tell exactly how it will come about, but everything points in that direction. That was a bit of a disappointment, as the author habitually keeps his card closer to his chest and does a better job concealing what he has in store for his readers. That doesn't necessarily take anything away from the overall reading experience, but it does rob Heritage of Cyador of any kind of "punch" to cap off the ending of the book. When all is said and done, Heritage of Cyador is another quality read by L. E. Modesitt, jr. Intelligent, thoughtful, action-packed, and entertaining without any unnecessary bells and whistles, once more this is adult fantasy by an author in perfect control of his craft and his universe. For more reviews: www.fantasyhotlist.blogspot.com

  14. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    I loathe leaving one of the books in this beloved series a 2 star review but I have to be honest. This book started out very slow and picked up on a character I didn't remember all that well without recap. It then continued on and never grabbed me. I had trouble keeping up with what was going on because it was nothing new for the series and nothing interesting.... Sorry I hope the next one is better! I loathe leaving one of the books in this beloved series a 2 star review but I have to be honest. This book started out very slow and picked up on a character I didn't remember all that well without recap. It then continued on and never grabbed me. I had trouble keeping up with what was going on because it was nothing new for the series and nothing interesting.... Sorry I hope the next one is better!

  15. 4 out of 5

    James

    Still love this author. His books always follow the same patterns but the characters and worlds he creates make the pattern work. That and reading a logically written novel is awesome to me. I'll keep reading and re-reading his books until they no longer exist. Still love this author. His books always follow the same patterns but the characters and worlds he creates make the pattern work. That and reading a logically written novel is awesome to me. I'll keep reading and re-reading his books until they no longer exist.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brett Hunt

    Another successful entry in the Saga of Recluce. This continues the story of Lerial and is a great follow-up to Cyador's Heirs. Although Modesitt's books tend toward a familiar pattern, it is one I enjoy time and again and hope he writes many more. Another successful entry in the Saga of Recluce. This continues the story of Lerial and is a great follow-up to Cyador's Heirs. Although Modesitt's books tend toward a familiar pattern, it is one I enjoy time and again and hope he writes many more.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jack Webb

    The end of an era Chronologically speaking, of course. This book ends (at least, so far), the stories of Cyador and Cigoerne in Hamor, circa 400. It also wraps up Lorial's journeys. As always, Modesitt's world-building is superb. The end of an era Chronologically speaking, of course. This book ends (at least, so far), the stories of Cyador and Cigoerne in Hamor, circa 400. It also wraps up Lorial's journeys. As always, Modesitt's world-building is superb.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Debra

    narrator was back to verbal sound effects *sigh* but otherwise it wasn't half bad narrator was back to verbal sound effects *sigh* but otherwise it wasn't half bad

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kathi

    9/10 Probably one of the best books in the Recluce series. It was a great mix of personal/romance, battle scenes, and political intrigue. Lerial is one of Modesitt’s best protagonists.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lupine Smile

    I felt this was a little more slowly paced than the first book in this grouping. Still good. I really like the characters in the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gail Morris

    just catching up on my book records

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Raymond

    A bit slow at some points, after battles for instance, but still an excellent read and good end to the adventures of Lerial.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Iain Kaslar

    Another great book in the recluse series

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Arthur

    Great as always Such a good book love his way to paint a picture. I always have a great time reading this universe.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eric Lewis

    Really liked the book. It was a very good finish to Lerial's story. Really liked the book. It was a very good finish to Lerial's story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josephine

    The intrigue carries on.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karina Halt

    I really liked this second book about Lerial. Recommended!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Natty

    I enjoyed this particular story very much.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Parsons

    It'sbeen a while since I read a Recluce novel. This one is just as good as all others I have read. On to "The Mongrel Mage" It'sbeen a while since I read a Recluce novel. This one is just as good as all others I have read. On to "The Mongrel Mage"

  30. 5 out of 5

    Richspurgeon

    Very enjoyable read. It was a good continuation from the previous book in the series.

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