website statistics Flappers and Philosophers [Annotated] - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Flappers and Philosophers [Annotated]

Availability: Ready to download

Flappers and Philosophers was the first collection of short stories written by F. Scott Fitzgerald. A classic of Jazz Age fiction. This collection contains the original review from the New York Times. Expertly formatted with a linked table of contents. Look for more classic books from Green Light. Visit us at - GreenLighteBooks.tumblr.com Twitter - @GreenLightbooks and faceb Flappers and Philosophers was the first collection of short stories written by F. Scott Fitzgerald. A classic of Jazz Age fiction. This collection contains the original review from the New York Times. Expertly formatted with a linked table of contents. Look for more classic books from Green Light. Visit us at - GreenLighteBooks.tumblr.com Twitter - @GreenLightbooks and facebook.com/greenlightbooks


Compare

Flappers and Philosophers was the first collection of short stories written by F. Scott Fitzgerald. A classic of Jazz Age fiction. This collection contains the original review from the New York Times. Expertly formatted with a linked table of contents. Look for more classic books from Green Light. Visit us at - GreenLighteBooks.tumblr.com Twitter - @GreenLightbooks and faceb Flappers and Philosophers was the first collection of short stories written by F. Scott Fitzgerald. A classic of Jazz Age fiction. This collection contains the original review from the New York Times. Expertly formatted with a linked table of contents. Look for more classic books from Green Light. Visit us at - GreenLighteBooks.tumblr.com Twitter - @GreenLightbooks and facebook.com/greenlightbooks

30 review for Flappers and Philosophers [Annotated]

  1. 4 out of 5

    MihaElla

    This was a lot of fun. Exceedingly. Awfully Fun. The sort of telling that I feel I had been not wasting time. And, extra to it, I am certainly much obliged to Daniel Coenn (whose name I’ve heard not until couple of weeks ago and for sure I'll easily forget, knowing and trusting my memory), as by fortunate accident I’ve found a little e-book named Francis Scott Fitzgerald: His Words, while I was in a random search for a new entry to start reading (although I have plenty of books in my own library This was a lot of fun. Exceedingly. Awfully Fun. The sort of telling that I feel I had been not wasting time. And, extra to it, I am certainly much obliged to Daniel Coenn (whose name I’ve heard not until couple of weeks ago and for sure I'll easily forget, knowing and trusting my memory), as by fortunate accident I’ve found a little e-book named Francis Scott Fitzgerald: His Words, while I was in a random search for a new entry to start reading (although I have plenty of books in my own library that I have not yet read...). So, my attention was gripped firmly while reading quite a bunch of the most famous quotes that populated this American writer works. I’ve always liked F. Scott F. and have read most of his novels and will most probably come back to them over time. So, reading some quotes from this e-book, I felt like refreshing my acquaintance with F. Scott F. and easily available – of course I look up first on free of charge offers – was this really very entertaining collection of short stories dated back 1920. Well, how about that? 100 years gone since its publication and my time of read. As we like to say, it is never too late. Fortunately! ≪ In the millennium an educational genius will write a book to be given to every young man on the date of his disillusion. This work will have the flavor of Montaigne's essays and Samuel Butler's note-books—and a little of Tolstoi and Marcus Aurelius. It will be neither cheerful nor pleasant but will contain numerous passages of striking humor. Since first-class minds never believe anything very strongly until they've experienced it, its value will be purely relative . . . all people over thirty will refer to it as "depressing. This prelude belongs to the story of a young man who lived, as you and I do, before the book. ≫ This little extraction is the start-up quote from the 7th short story,’Dalyrimple goes wrong’, who is a character torn between self and society. I found it very valuable, through its most obvious irony: does Dalyrimple “go wrong” when he chooses to become a masked burglar to make ends meet (though he wanted to work honestly)- or when he is, by a stroke of fate, rewarded at the end because he has learned to “cut corners’ and land on “the right side of the fence”? 😊 Sliding swiftly and with style, or better said serpentlike intensity through these eight short stories, I wholeheartedly may say that I’m mighty glad of now having read them and, if I can give a verdict, these stories are to get you going good 😉 Being an impressionistic nature, I was definitely attracted by both words from the title: flappers and philosophers, and I have had a little bit of time dedicated to google-ing to read more about these “flappers” thing. It’s always good to put together as many pieces of the puzzle (I sincerely confess I was somehow ignorant of the history of “flappers”), especially when this word is assigned to stories written by the famous Jazz age iconic writer. I have been awfully overjoyed by the story ‘Bernice bobs her hair’, this could justify why I have posted so many quotes from this story, almost an entire chapter at some point. I have very personal reasons, of course. I felt myself part of the story – both as a character but also symbolically, I mean even before getting to this collection of stories I have taken the decision to ‘bob my hair’. It was great to see what were the so-called social standards for a generation of young Americans, what were in their mind the secrets of popularity, what were you supposed to say at a dinner table or on the dance floor, overall how a girl should make herself more socially appealing. As we well know this involves a lot of advice on conversation, poise, carriage, dancing, expression, dress, and personality, etc etc. I wasn’t myself in a similar situation (or perhaps I was, yes-yes I was some good years back, if I take into account three weddings that I was invited to attend and where some high personages wanted to make me ‘look’ more socially appealing, haha), but I did make a pledge to ‘bob my hair’ if I pass successfully the entry exams for university (actually in the those old gone years I had had very long hair, and quite beautiful for that young age, and of course I had proceeded to sacrifice this beloved possession - my tresses 😊(how silly and funny we’re when we’re young). Nowadays, to ‘bob my hair’ has less traumatic effects. I guess after a certain age, things to be done not only feel less painful, mentally-wise, but also you realize that you like yourself no matter the length of the hair. Curiously enough, I have arrived at the end enthusiastically and smiling and smiling and being rather absurdly happy 😉 That is to count for a gay time I’ve been having, and concluding this is an absolute jewel – I mean reading was such a little thing, and surprisingly a happy thing. Hope this makes sense! I have tremendously enjoyed all of the stories, and I was very pleased to see that each one had a surprising closing effect, something that I was not prepared for. Well, of course they are not thrillers or crime-based history, but the conclusion is in the opposite direction with the general flow of the story. I guess that is what made me loved the stories even more. Still the general effect is that misty waves have been passing before my eyes, I felt too gay and fickle and cheerfully collapsing backward upon my bed, upon each story closing. ≪ “I want to be a society vampire, you see,” she announced coolly, and went on to inform him that bobbed hair was the necessary prelude. She added that she wanted to ask his advice, because she had heard he was so critical about girls.”

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vit Babenco

    Flappers and Philosophers are the tales of youth, mostly… Stories of young dreamers and their beautiful dreams being broken. And I admired how excellently the spirit of that rather rebellious epoch was preserved in the tales. Ardita scrutinized him carefully — and classed him immediately as a romantic figure. He gave the effect of towering self-confidence erected on a slight foundation — just under the surface of each of his decisions she discerned a hesitancy that was in decided contrast to the Flappers and Philosophers are the tales of youth, mostly… Stories of young dreamers and their beautiful dreams being broken. And I admired how excellently the spirit of that rather rebellious epoch was preserved in the tales. Ardita scrutinized him carefully — and classed him immediately as a romantic figure. He gave the effect of towering self-confidence erected on a slight foundation — just under the surface of each of his decisions she discerned a hesitancy that was in decided contrast to the arrogant curl of his lips. Being a supreme egotist Ardita frequently thought about herself; never having had her egotism disputed she did it entirely naturally and with no detraction from her unquestioned charm. Though she was nineteen she gave the effect of a high-spirited precocious child, and in the present glow of her youth and beauty all the men and women she had known were but driftwood on the ripples of her temperament. She had met other egotists — in fact she found that selfish people bored her rather less than unselfish people — but as yet there had not been one she had not eventually defeated and brought to her feet. The language is elaborately metaphoric and light irony prevails while the plots are always intriguing and original. In its mood The Cut-Glass Bowl differs from the other stories – it a kind of a sarcastically dark allegory of fate… …the night I told him I was going to marry Harold, seven years ago in ninety-two, he drew himself way up and said: ‘Evylyn, I’m going to give a present that’s as hard as you are and as beautiful and as empty and as easy to see through.’ He frightened me a little — his eyes were so black. I thought he was going to deed me a haunted house or something that would explode when you opened it. That bowl came, and of course it’s beautiful. And this splendid bowl has unexpectedly turned into the instrument of doom… “At eighteen our convictions are hills from which we look; at forty-five they are caves in which we hide.” Our expectations for the future are always greater than our disappointments of the past.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anita NotherBook

    This little book of eight short stories took me about a week to read, and now I’m very sorry that it’s over. All of the stories were very entertaining and vivid. It made me feel like I was a nineteen-year-old girl in the first or second decade of the twentieth century. Many of the stories in this book are focused on girls of that age, and I thought it was quite strange that Fitzgerald could write so well about them. Almost all of the stories can be classified as "coming of age" stories in the ea This little book of eight short stories took me about a week to read, and now I’m very sorry that it’s over. All of the stories were very entertaining and vivid. It made me feel like I was a nineteen-year-old girl in the first or second decade of the twentieth century. Many of the stories in this book are focused on girls of that age, and I thought it was quite strange that Fitzgerald could write so well about them. Almost all of the stories can be classified as "coming of age" stories in the early twentieth century. The book starts off with a strong and rebellious nineteen-year-old girl in “The Offshore Pirate.” That first story was probably my favorite. My second favorite was probably “Bernice Bobs Her Hair,” which was also about a nineteen-year-old who was figuring herself out a lot more than the heroine from the first story, who knew exactly who she was and what she wanted. I also liked “The Ice Palace” in which a very vivacious teenager named Sally Carroll visits a Northeastern city in the hopes of marrying, and finds out that she misses the colorful southern town where she grew up. The last story in the collection, “The Four Fists,” features a manly man who gets knocked down by four punches in his lifetime, each of which teaches him an important lesson, and the story takes him from New York to the oil fields of Texas and the ranches of New Mexico. It felt rather refreshing to read a burly story after all the quite feminine ones, but I truly liked them all. The second-to-last story, “Dalyrimple Goes Wrong,” also features a male character and his descent into shadiness. What I noticed is how differently Fitzgerald writes about male characters than female characters – there’s less internal monologue and descriptions of thoughts and conversations, and more action at a swiftly moving pace. One story, “Head and Shoulders” does a beautiful job of explaining a role reversal of sorts, in which the female character shines and the male character withers. To read this book was to be transported back to a totally different time – anywhere from the 1890’s to the 19-teens, and to totally different places – usually New England towns, Ivy League educational institutions, and country clubs. I enjoyed the scenes about fox trots and flappers and jazz music and I wished, sometimes, that I could have lived back then. But Fitzgerald had great sympathy for his female characters – “The Cut-Glass Bowl” featured a downfall of one of them, and the strong character of Marjorie in “Bernice Bobs Her Hair” explains how the young girls can become withered and unloved housewives, many of whom are disapprovingly interspersed into that story. In fact, if I carry one thing away from Flappers and Philosophers other than hours of entertaining reading, it is a remark on the position of young women in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. Many of the stories feature girls at the cusp of womanhood who wear rose-tinted glasses and think that life is about dances and social events. Yet the men are the ones getting an education, seeing the world and taking part in all of the action (again with the exception of the uniquely witty “Heads and Shoulders” plot). In this sense I am very happy to be living in the 21st century and just reading about these female characters in the early 20th century.

  4. 4 out of 5

    BAM Endlessly Booked

    This is not his best writing. I'm guessing Zelda didn't help much. These stories just kept him in the bucks. I'm not shying away from reading his novels because of these short stories. I don't feel like these reflect his talent. This is not his best writing. I'm guessing Zelda didn't help much. These stories just kept him in the bucks. I'm not shying away from reading his novels because of these short stories. I don't feel like these reflect his talent.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    F. Scott Fitzgerald’s prose is like pizza and sex. Even when it’s bad, it’s good. Flappers and Philosophers, published in 1920, is a collection of mostly forgettable stories that lionize the rich and rarely challenge the reader’s world view. But that only explains why they’re annoying, not why they’re inferior. The opening story, “The Offshore Pirate” is inferior because of its jaw-dropping sexism. Ha-ha-ha lets manipulate a head-strong girl because we men know how what’s best for her. Fitzgerald F. Scott Fitzgerald’s prose is like pizza and sex. Even when it’s bad, it’s good. Flappers and Philosophers, published in 1920, is a collection of mostly forgettable stories that lionize the rich and rarely challenge the reader’s world view. But that only explains why they’re annoying, not why they’re inferior. The opening story, “The Offshore Pirate” is inferior because of its jaw-dropping sexism. Ha-ha-ha lets manipulate a head-strong girl because we men know how what’s best for her. Fitzgerald is obsessed by head-strong girls, and nearly every story paints her in vivid colors. Fitzgerald is a genius of characterization. When he describes a person, you see him or her instantly, and you start comparing people you know in real life with them. The women in these stories are clever but not threatening. When a woman does succeed by her wits, such as in “Head and Shoulders,” it’s by luck and the patronage of besotted men. “Head and Shoulders” is a story that works however because its premise is interesting: A philosopher and a flapper fall in love and trade places in the social hierarchy. If you can turn a blind eye to the patronizing framework, the story is well-crafted and filled with wry wit. “Bernice Bobs Her Hair,” is as dumb as you would expect. Rarely does a title so aptly telegraph a story’s weight. Fitzgerald lurches into a proto-feminism at the end, when Bernice enacts revenge and apparently becomes a free-agent. One suspects that nobody really gave him much credit for that lurch, though, and he never developed feminist sensibilities further. It’s as if he wants to make his women characters stronger, but he just doesn’t know how. He’s different from Anthony Trollope, who, while being a far inferior writer, on rare occasions let his women characters dance closer to the edge of impropriety (The first half of Miss Mackenzie and much of Can You Forgive Her?) Trollope seems to consciously bar the gate of where women can and can’t go, whereas Fitzgerald doesn’t seem capable of imagining women crossing into a feminist threshold. But boy, does he love to watch them run headlong into the forbidden zone. Gloria’s epic midnight run in Beautiful and Damned has several antecedents here. “The Ice Palace” and “Benediction” both feature women who have some sort of psychological breakdown that acts as a sort of epiphany. These early attempts suffer from a sense that they just seem too contrived, that Fitzgerald is trying stuff out or simply didn’t know how else to end the story. I found “Benediction” the most interesting story because it deals head-on with religion. I’m sorry Gatsby fans, but Dr. T. J. Eckleburg is more of a dodge than a statement on God and religion. Just because you yourself might be vague and uncertain on religion doesn’t mean that a vague and uncertain take on religion shows genius. In “Benediction” a flapper visits her brother, who is in a seminary. Here issues of belief and non-belief, and the proper role of a Christian are addressed. Is it better to lead a monastic life or to live life in the world? Hold on – is this Fitzgerald or Dostoyevsky? What’s great about short stories is that it allows readers to discover aspects of authors that are absent in novels. “Benediction” shows that Fitzgerald wasn’t ignorant about religion any more than Jane Austen was ignorant about Napoleon (as evidenced in her uncompleted novel Sandition. Fitzgerald seems to have been rather ignorant or lazy about business as evidenced by “Four Fists.” A somewhat humorous story about how a guy got hit in the face four times because he was a douchebag at various times in his life is marred by the details of the fourth fist. A rancher hits him because he’s buying him out and this is bad…why? We’re supposed to feel sympathy for the rancher, but Fitzgerald’s sketchy details about the deal make this all but impossible. It has the feel of Seinfeld’s Art Vandelay Import/Export business. While many of the stories have a modern feel, or more precisely, a 1950’s feel, there are occasionally jarring references to an earlier time. For example, in “The Cut-Glass Bowl” (spoiler alert!) a girl has her hand amputated after she gets blood poisoning. As Owen Wilson declared in Midnight in Paris, “These people didn’t have antibiotics!” So is this short story collection worth reading? Definitely if you’re a Fitzgerald fan. You can only read Gatsby so many times. To better understand its true genius you need to read his other work so you can better understand what he kept and what he kept out.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lora Grigorova

    Flappers and Philosophers: http://readwithstyle.wordpress.com/20... I must admit what drew me to the collection, despite of course the name of Fitzgerald, is the title. I mean, come on, Flappers and Philosophers is simply genial. I doubt anyone in the 1920s would ever use the word philosopher do describe a flapper. Flappers, for those of you who don’t know, were a “new breed” of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain Flappers and Philosophers: http://readwithstyle.wordpress.com/20... I must admit what drew me to the collection, despite of course the name of Fitzgerald, is the title. I mean, come on, Flappers and Philosophers is simply genial. I doubt anyone in the 1920s would ever use the word philosopher do describe a flapper. Flappers, for those of you who don’t know, were a “new breed” of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.” First rule of every student – when possible, always use Wikipedia (even one of the professors in the ever so acclaimed HEC cited Wikipedia in a finance class, so I don’t feel guilty at all). I wouldn’t provide a definition of a philosopher here, except to say that for most people it would be the exact opposite to a flapper. And yet somewhat magically Fitzgerald manages to balance the duality of flapper and the philosopher in his characters. I must say, all of us women are flappers and philosophers, simultaneously. Whatever works for us at that particular moment. The stories in Flappers and Philosophers are of course about the Jazz Age – the excess, the debauchery and the greed associated with it. Fitzgerald’s characters in this collection foreshadow his more complex characters in the future novels to come – shallow, self-absorbed, obsessed with beauty, money, and power, greedy, and sometimes extremely cruel. And yet, exactly these flappers produce so profound conclusions about life that the reader has nothing else to do but gasp with astonishment: Read more: http://readwithstyle.wordpress.com/20...

  7. 4 out of 5

    gwayle

    I adored this collection of eight short stories from early in F. Scott Fitzgerald's writing career. They are largely comings of age, many from surprisingly believable female perspectives. Remarkably fresh, tender, funny, well crafted—free from the tropes that drive me nuts in a lot of contemporary short fiction: the bogs of interior monologues, the random slices of life in which nothing happens (and what's the point...?), the let's stop the story abruptly on the cusp of the action "technique." A I adored this collection of eight short stories from early in F. Scott Fitzgerald's writing career. They are largely comings of age, many from surprisingly believable female perspectives. Remarkably fresh, tender, funny, well crafted—free from the tropes that drive me nuts in a lot of contemporary short fiction: the bogs of interior monologues, the random slices of life in which nothing happens (and what's the point...?), the let's stop the story abruptly on the cusp of the action "technique." A stubborn young woman's ship is overrun by "pirates" and she makes a surprising course correction. A Southern woman visits her fiancé's family up North for the first time and experiences culture shock. A promising young philosopher marries an entertainer in an amusing story of conjugal role reversal. A large cut-glass bowl watches over an unraveling life and marriage. An out-of-towner learns the secrets of popularity from her scheming cousin. A young woman on the cusp of a romantic rendezvous visits her brother, a monk. A young man hears the siren song of easy criminality. A man is punched in the face four times throughout his life: each time, his life and character improve. Reviewers say that Fitzgerald gets even better later in his career.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    "You've been through all of F. Scott Fitzgerald's books You're very well read It's well known" -Bob Dylan "Ballad of a Thin Man" I could tell that "Flappers" was the work of a young writer. Some of the stories felt a little formulaic and predictable. You could see their bones sticking out. Other times it felt like Mr. Fitzgerald was trying to pop off the page saying, "Ooh! Look! I interrupt the flow of this story to remind you that I'm the author! Look how intricate these sentences are! Isn't my dia "You've been through all of F. Scott Fitzgerald's books You're very well read It's well known" -Bob Dylan "Ballad of a Thin Man" I could tell that "Flappers" was the work of a young writer. Some of the stories felt a little formulaic and predictable. You could see their bones sticking out. Other times it felt like Mr. Fitzgerald was trying to pop off the page saying, "Ooh! Look! I interrupt the flow of this story to remind you that I'm the author! Look how intricate these sentences are! Isn't my dialogue believable?" I guess subtlety was not young Mr. Fitzgerald's strong suit: his narrative voice can be at times like a megaphone. THAT having been said, I enjoyed the crap out of these stories. They are all well written fun to read. And there's nothing I like more than a good book of good short stories. Four stars for that. I'm going to read more of this man's work in the near future. Also: this book has a great cover. It would make a really cool tattoo.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    I might be being overgenerous here, but I so enjoyed these stories. This is Fitzgerald's first collection, and while they may lack the substance matter of his later works, there's such grace, elegance and beauty here, albeit somewhat ephemeral. More flappery than philosophical, certainly. And yet, these 8 tales perfectly encompass the zeitgeist of the 1920s, dealing with mainly flirting, dating, romance, but occasionally more profound subjects too, such as choosing one's path, whether it is pres I might be being overgenerous here, but I so enjoyed these stories. This is Fitzgerald's first collection, and while they may lack the substance matter of his later works, there's such grace, elegance and beauty here, albeit somewhat ephemeral. More flappery than philosophical, certainly. And yet, these 8 tales perfectly encompass the zeitgeist of the 1920s, dealing with mainly flirting, dating, romance, but occasionally more profound subjects too, such as choosing one's path, whether it is presented, guided along or beaten into one, literally. For sheer reading pleasure this is a literary equivalent of a marshmallow or something equally light, pleasant and delicious. It's absolutely worth reading just to temporary armchair travel to a different era. Utterly charming. Sincerely recommended.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liselotte

    If you have the Penguin Modern Classics "The curious case of Benjamin Button and six other stories", I do not recommend getting this one, because half of the stories are the same. I really like Fitzgerald's writing, unfortunately as he's not a Good Person at all. I do recommend it if you like short stories! If you have the Penguin Modern Classics "The curious case of Benjamin Button and six other stories", I do not recommend getting this one, because half of the stories are the same. I really like Fitzgerald's writing, unfortunately as he's not a Good Person at all. I do recommend it if you like short stories!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hákon Gunnarsson

    I like F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, so I had some expectations about this book. It is his first short story collection, and I have been on a short story binge lately. "The offshore pirate" is the first story in this book, and I have to admit that I almost gave up after that one. I found it rediculous, and I think it is the worst story in the collection. Luckily I continued and read the next one which is "The ice palace". I think that one is among the best stories in the book. It is a I like F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, so I had some expectations about this book. It is his first short story collection, and I have been on a short story binge lately. "The offshore pirate" is the first story in this book, and I have to admit that I almost gave up after that one. I found it rediculous, and I think it is the worst story in the collection. Luckily I continued and read the next one which is "The ice palace". I think that one is among the best stories in the book. It is a story about the difficulties that can arise in relationships between people of different cultural background. My other favorite in the book is "Bernice bobs her hair" which I found delightful. It is a story about two young women, and their rivalry, I suppose one could call it. There are other stories like "Head and shoulder" which are interesting, but lack something to become really good. With "Head and shoulder" it is that the characters that are just a little too talented, a little too great, for the story to become interesting. It is a fair enough first collection, with some very good stories, some okay ones, and others that really don't work for me at least.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    It’s always difficult to comment on a collection of short stories as they vary, and a common thread is often hard to discern. But Fitzgerald, who selected these early stories, may have given a clue with his title. Flappers are associated with attractive young women in the l920’s who often flaunted conventional behavior, and philosophers one associates with more fundamental meanings, implied by the reader, not explicitly stated by Fitzgerald. In nearly all of the eight stories, a situation is s It’s always difficult to comment on a collection of short stories as they vary, and a common thread is often hard to discern. But Fitzgerald, who selected these early stories, may have given a clue with his title. Flappers are associated with attractive young women in the l920’s who often flaunted conventional behavior, and philosophers one associates with more fundamental meanings, implied by the reader, not explicitly stated by Fitzgerald. In nearly all of the eight stories, a situation is set up and at the end there is always disillusionment when the chief character becomes like Coleridge’s Ancient Mariner, sadder and wiser. In the first story, “The Offshore Pirate”, a 19 year old Ardita is kidnapped by a modern day “pirate” who convinces her that he has stolen money and is about to embark for south America. She believes him, finds out the truth, considerably less glamorous than she had been led to believe, but ironically finds this fiction to be more pleasurable than the dull and spoiled rich life she had been leading. “The Ice Palace” similarly has a change of locale from an easy-going South to a more formal and rigid North. It is the middle of winter in New England, and a young woman has a nightmarish vision of being trapped in a literal ice palace, metaphorically a culture where she is out of place. Disillusionment again, but this time, though, she wants to return to where she came from, unlike the first story. In a third story , “Bernice Bobs Her Hair,” with a young female protagonist, there is a return to where one came from, but in this case, the disillusionment comes with a triumphant note. The unpopular Bernice is tormented by her pretty and popular cousin who she is visiting. She manages to turn the table and return home, but before she does, she cuts off the locks of her cousin’s hair while she is sleeping. It’s going home with a victorious vengeance. In”The Cut Glass Bowl” a marriage symbolically comes to pieces with tEvelyn dropping a huge cut cut glass bowl that shatters into a thousand pieces of broken glass. Relationships - do they ever last? Not all of the stories feature women. Three concentrate on men, but again there are the abrupt endings. Fitzgerald essentially writes the same story over and over, but the details of the variations are scrupulously crafted, and once a reader is hooked , there is no escaping the pleasure and fascination of his fiction.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Hall

    3.5/5* I did really enjoy the writing style of this book. However, I did not completely love the style and structure of this short story collection. Well written, but the stories fell flat and they were cut short too often. I never truly became engulfed in any story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Toria

    It now have been cleare to me that no matter how much I try to read F. Scott Fitzgerald I'm not a huge fan of his writing, it's not bad by any means just not my cup of tea. Don't get brain tingles from it and I'm not overly entertained by them. It now have been cleare to me that no matter how much I try to read F. Scott Fitzgerald I'm not a huge fan of his writing, it's not bad by any means just not my cup of tea. Don't get brain tingles from it and I'm not overly entertained by them.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    This set of eight Fitzgerald short stories was first published by Scribner's in 1920. The plots seem mostly contrived but they are definitely written by a master, as they are still interesting and readable today. In particular, the details of the story present a fascinating glimpse into the times in which Fitzgerald lived. Some jarring notes include the casual and flippant racist slurs and stereotypes found in one or two stories. Fitzgerald, though, indicates awareness of the impact of racism (a This set of eight Fitzgerald short stories was first published by Scribner's in 1920. The plots seem mostly contrived but they are definitely written by a master, as they are still interesting and readable today. In particular, the details of the story present a fascinating glimpse into the times in which Fitzgerald lived. Some jarring notes include the casual and flippant racist slurs and stereotypes found in one or two stories. Fitzgerald, though, indicates awareness of the impact of racism (and a lack of geographical knowledge), by having the main character in "The Offshore Pirate," say, "If he'd been white he'd have been king of South America by now," and go on to praise the man's intelligence (which the female he speaks to finds ridiculously funny). In this way, Fitzgerald is showing us how the rich and fashionable set of that time thinks, but we can't assume that he, too, buys into it, at least not from this story. Some of the details I found most interesting were in "The Cut Glass Bowl," where a family's fortunes start plummeting in multiple ways after the man of the house drinks too much at a dinner party for his new business partner. Another story, "The Ice Palace," strongly resembles the courtship between Scott (from Minnesota) and Zelda (from Alabama). Everything is perfect when Harry meets Sally Carrol in her home in the deep south, but when she goes north in the winter, she finds almost nothing to like. In particular, she's disappointed that men won't flirt with her after they find out that she's engaged to Harry. And she finds the women to be cold and silent, like "glorified domestics. Men are the centre of every social group." In this case, the romantic relationship does not withstand their cultural differences. I wonder what Fitzgerald was thinking about his own marriage when he wrote it. The stories included are quite different from each other, with "The Benediction," about a religious experience, leaving me completely mystified about what happened and why, and "The Four Fists" a well-done character-driven story built built around four violent episodes in a man's life. The most famous is "Bernice Bobs her Hair," an interesting take on society's expectations of middle class young ladies. According to the introduction, the "rules" Bernice gets from her cousin that turn her from wallflower to the life of the party were actually drawn from advice that Fitzgerald gave to his sister. None of this is great literature, but the stories are rich for insight into the social history of the time. There's an element of truth found in each of these and that's surely what editors and readers of the time responded to: Fitzerald's potential to tell us a lot about themselves and the times they lived in.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anna Kļaviņa

    THE OFFSHORE PIRATE 3 Ardita rebels against her uncle, who wishes her to behave as a respectable lady. He leaves her alone, and the ship is taken by Carlyle and his group of pirates. Things aren't all as they seem. THE ICE PALACE 4 Sally Carrol thinks that she wants a different life than the one she leads in the South, with a man who isn't like the boys she grew up with. Her engagement to Henry and her trip North show her what that different life would be like. HEAD AND SHOULDERS 3.5 Horace Tarbox is THE OFFSHORE PIRATE 3 Ardita rebels against her uncle, who wishes her to behave as a respectable lady. He leaves her alone, and the ship is taken by Carlyle and his group of pirates. Things aren't all as they seem. THE ICE PALACE 4 Sally Carrol thinks that she wants a different life than the one she leads in the South, with a man who isn't like the boys she grew up with. Her engagement to Henry and her trip North show her what that different life would be like. HEAD AND SHOULDERS 3.5 Horace Tarbox is known as a prodigy. He sees a plan for his life, until he meets Marcia Meadow. The knock at his door changes all the plans he thought he had. THE CUT-GLASS BOWL 5 Evylyn and Harold Piper experience many events throughout their marriage, some pleasant and some tragic. BERNICE BOBS HER HAIR 4.5 Marjorie's attempts to improve Bernice's social skills has unexpected consequences. BENEDICTION 3 In the midst of a major life decision, Lois reacquaints herself with her older brother who is training to be a Jesuit priest. THE FOUR FISTS 3 Samuel Meredith recalls some pivotal moments in his life. from http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/84/flappers...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Muftarovam

    I would start with saying that I've loved Fitzgerald since the first story I've read by him. His style of writing is underestimated and it can be difficult to comprehend if one doesn't understand American slang from the "roaring twenties", but as you read along the stories you can get a good idea of what he is trying to say. Fitzgerald builds his characters in a way that fascinate and stick with the reader (at least in my case) and his writing completely inserts the reader into a scene, like the I would start with saying that I've loved Fitzgerald since the first story I've read by him. His style of writing is underestimated and it can be difficult to comprehend if one doesn't understand American slang from the "roaring twenties", but as you read along the stories you can get a good idea of what he is trying to say. Fitzgerald builds his characters in a way that fascinate and stick with the reader (at least in my case) and his writing completely inserts the reader into a scene, like they, themselves are present and/or are one of the characters. This specific collection of short stories is his most prized and famous one, and for a reason. I would recommend it to any lover of American literature who wants to get sucked into this fabulous whirlwind of quality, well-written stories that Fitzgerald has to offer. I look forward to reading more from him.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rick Slane

    I read the stories in this collection and a few more collected elsewhere. The Diamond as Big as the Ritz was the one I enjoyed the most, but it was not in this collection. I read the stories in this collection and a few more collected elsewhere. The Diamond as Big as the Ritz was the one I enjoyed the most, but it was not in this collection.

  19. 5 out of 5

    R.a.

    As with much other Fitzgerald work, this collection of eight stories ignites joy and admiration. A reader can see early imprints of Gatsby in “The Offshore Pirate” although the racial epithets at various points shock a bit. Upon review, however, the reader also can trace the characters’ differing “world points-of-view” and thinking based on the tones and utterances of these. “The Ice Palace,” a re-read for me, reveals a deeper, more complex writer, and again “hidden” points of view and prejudices As with much other Fitzgerald work, this collection of eight stories ignites joy and admiration. A reader can see early imprints of Gatsby in “The Offshore Pirate” although the racial epithets at various points shock a bit. Upon review, however, the reader also can trace the characters’ differing “world points-of-view” and thinking based on the tones and utterances of these. “The Ice Palace,” a re-read for me, reveals a deeper, more complex writer, and again “hidden” points of view and prejudices rise and reveal themselves. “Head and Shoulders” simply is a “fun” story. Its transverse plot line, reminiscent of Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, leaves the reader in the world of comedy rather than tragedy, however. Not so with his next story, “The Cut Glass Bowl.” And, like “The Ice Palace,” this story seems more complex. Not intending to continue with the author / plot / style comparisons, I nevertheless cannot help but feel and hear echoes of Wharton, here. “Bernice Bobs Her Hair,” another re-read, represents perhaps the “typical” or most expected Fitzgerald-type story. It reveals the indifference, selfishness, cruelty, and mean dispositions of various elite characters. Re-reading this, I cannot remember if the little film with Shelley Duval, (as Bernice), deviated from the original story’s plot. Casting Duval, however, does “shift” the reader’s / viewer’s conception of Bernice. “Benediction” either may frustrate or inspire the reader. And, it’s placement within the collection almost seems a natural counter to the rest of the stories presented. “Benediction” precedes my favorite within this collection, “Dalyrimple Goes Wrong.” Here is, perhaps, a most problematic story—one infused with great irony. Due to the particulars, one could, I think, read, re-read, and read again this story to “pin down” for clarity or intention certain elements or points of view. This story also becomes striking since it is the first time we see a Fitzgerald protagonist who attended a state college versus the usual Ivy League or small private academy / school. And appropriate to this, “The Four Fists” follows. The conclusion is wonderful; and, like his acquaintances, readers finally can come to find Samuel “likable.” One wonders, though, given the violence here—and the social outlay, whether this story could find “light” and success today? Hmmm. Like the other short story collections of Fitzgerald, almost all, if not all, the stories bring a joy in the reading. "Yes," some are more "shallow" than others. But, his particular insights coupled with his style always seem to achieve both the “entertaining” aspect of fiction with the deeper “messaging” aspect of fiction. Pretty wonderful.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    F. Scott Fitzgerald is a master at evoking the era he coined The Jazz Age. Each story in this collection is cinematic in tone and made me feel as if I had stepped back in time and become immersed in the world of the roaring twenties. As is the case with short story collections, I liked some stories much more than others. The wonderful thing about Fitzgerald, though, is that even if I hated the premise of a story or the characters within it, by the end I was still shaking my head and admitting hi F. Scott Fitzgerald is a master at evoking the era he coined The Jazz Age. Each story in this collection is cinematic in tone and made me feel as if I had stepped back in time and become immersed in the world of the roaring twenties. As is the case with short story collections, I liked some stories much more than others. The wonderful thing about Fitzgerald, though, is that even if I hated the premise of a story or the characters within it, by the end I was still shaking my head and admitting his story-telling genus. **A warning for modern audiences: Fitzgerald's characters use racial slurs on occasion. This made me uncomfortable even though I understand these stories are of their time.**

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    A collection of 8 short stories, all quite easy to read in a short amount of time. I feel the book is best read backwards so you finish with the better stories as sadly after a really great start this fizzled out somewhat in the last few tales. However that being said the writing was lovely throughout, a great style of writing which was a pleasure to read and he somehow cleverly manages to create real depth to these stories which is hard to do when they are so brief. Each had some wonderful char A collection of 8 short stories, all quite easy to read in a short amount of time. I feel the book is best read backwards so you finish with the better stories as sadly after a really great start this fizzled out somewhat in the last few tales. However that being said the writing was lovely throughout, a great style of writing which was a pleasure to read and he somehow cleverly manages to create real depth to these stories which is hard to do when they are so brief. Each had some wonderful characters which he brought to life so well, some great strong female characters too which I loved. Do read this book, but do start with the 8th story and work your way back from there.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    If you love Fitzgerald, you will absolutely love this collection. Bernice Bobs Her Hair almost made me give this book a 5. Easily one of my favorite short stories. Really quick read and truly a delight getting to know all the characters Fitzgerald cooks up, even though they are really all versions of one or two.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Greta Mcgee

    Fitzgerald is an exceptional writer, I believe. I took a lot from him in these short stories. In each story it was never the same character. Every character had a different dream and future, which always made me devour every story in this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Austin Hunt

    What an entertaining set of short stories about youth and rebellion in the 1910s! All of them are excellent, though my favorites are probably “Head and Shoulders” and “The Offshore Pirate” because they end with an ironic twist.

  25. 4 out of 5

    George

    ENTERTAINING SHORT STORIES. “Beauty has got to be astonishing, astounding—it’s got to burst in on you like a dream, like the exquisite eyes of a girl.” (p. 11)—The Offshore Pirate Originally published in 1920, at the dawn of the Jazz Age, Flappers and Philosophers is an anthology of eight entertaining short stories by the master storyteller, F. Scott Fitzgerald. Although I enjoyed my first encounter with F. Scott’s short fiction, I still much prefer, and recommend, the short stories of O’Henry, T. ENTERTAINING SHORT STORIES. “Beauty has got to be astonishing, astounding—it’s got to burst in on you like a dream, like the exquisite eyes of a girl.” (p. 11)—The Offshore Pirate Originally published in 1920, at the dawn of the Jazz Age, Flappers and Philosophers is an anthology of eight entertaining short stories by the master storyteller, F. Scott Fitzgerald. Although I enjoyed my first encounter with F. Scott’s short fiction, I still much prefer, and recommend, the short stories of O’Henry, T. C. Boyle, Somerset Maugham, Damon Runyon and Mark Twain. Recommendation: Worth the indulgence. “Happiness was what he wanted—a slowly rising scale of gratifications of the normal appetites—and he had a strong conviction that the materials, if not the inspiration of happiness, could be bought with money.” (p. 106)—Dalyrimple Goes Wrong Open Road Media. Kindle Edition. 122 pages.

  26. 5 out of 5

    jess

    3.5 stars I really enjoyed this collection of short stories, so much so I read it in two days. One particular aspect of every story I really loved was the character development. In the matter of a few pages, it felt as if this character was fully sculpted in my mind. So many of these stories had so so much potential, and I found myself wanting more at the end of all of them. It left me somewhat frustrated at certain points, however surely it is positive if I am still craving for more? I definitely w 3.5 stars I really enjoyed this collection of short stories, so much so I read it in two days. One particular aspect of every story I really loved was the character development. In the matter of a few pages, it felt as if this character was fully sculpted in my mind. So many of these stories had so so much potential, and I found myself wanting more at the end of all of them. It left me somewhat frustrated at certain points, however surely it is positive if I am still craving for more? I definitely would recommend this novel if you are wanting an introduction to American literature, because these stories cover the main themes you can find.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Simon Robs

    More Flapp than Philo but who's counting?! A couple three were really good and flapper philosophy rules obeisance in these jazzy skirts. More Flapp than Philo but who's counting?! A couple three were really good and flapper philosophy rules obeisance in these jazzy skirts.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Illiterate

    Fitzgerald captures a time when disillusionment with progress & purpose led to aestheticism & cleverness.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Suvi

    It's time. A while ago I decided to slowly reacquaint myself with Fitzgerald, and I feel it's now the perfect time, because my taste in prose has somewhat evolved since my experience with The Great Gatsby (1925), so I want to see whether there's something I've missed or if there's a quality to it I can appreciate more now that I'm older. First, though, I was intrigued by Fitzgerald's first short story collection. Published the same year as his debut novel, This Side of Paradise (1920), Flappers a It's time. A while ago I decided to slowly reacquaint myself with Fitzgerald, and I feel it's now the perfect time, because my taste in prose has somewhat evolved since my experience with The Great Gatsby (1925), so I want to see whether there's something I've missed or if there's a quality to it I can appreciate more now that I'm older. First, though, I was intrigued by Fitzgerald's first short story collection. Published the same year as his debut novel, This Side of Paradise (1920), Flappers and Philosophers is mostly a subtle and sensitive look into the 1920s with echoes of Fitzgerald's private life here and there. There's the mismatched pair of Head and Shoulders, where at its melancholic conclusion comes a realization that romance comes with a price. There's Bernice Bobs Her Hair, where bobbing your hair (a recognizable feature of flappers) becomes a symbol for courage and a way to attract boys, but which in the end is only revered as an image (a wet dream of the conservatives), not a concrete act. However, only two of the stories stood out to me and to which the rest don't measure up (especially the four I haven't mentioned). The Offshore Pirate, the opening story, was a big surprise for me, because it's essentially a love story. It's not your typical cotton candy fare, though. It's as zesty as the main character, Ardita, in all her spoiled flapper glory, and as glimmering as a turquoise sea during a summer day. It's a glass of bubbly under a starry sky and the sound of waves hitting against the sides of a boat. The Ice Palace, on the other hand, is mostly about the difference between the South and the North. Sally's growing disillusionment and the abstract need for something big culminates in an ice palace, where loneliness turns into a hazy and dreamlike wave of crystal clear ice, and Fitzgerald's prose tinkles like ice cubes in a glass. For me, Flappers and Philosophers wasn't a complete success, but the few diamonds made me confident to continue with more Fitzgerald. More zestiness and tinkling, please! "And courage to me meant ploughing through that dull gray mist that comes down on life - not only overriding people and circumstances but overriding the bleakness of living. A sort of insistence on the value of life and the worth of transient things." "We're going through the black air with our arms wide and our feet straight out behind like a dolphin's tail, and we're going to think we'll never hit the silver down there till suddenly it'll be all warm round us and full of little kissing, caressing waves."

  30. 5 out of 5

    PennsyLady (Bev)

    Finished on Jul 28, 2014 Flappers and Philosophers (1920) by F. Scott Fitzgerald hardcover Flappers and Philosophers, first published in 1920, marked Fitzgerald's entry into the short story arena. As a rule, I'm not taken with short stories; but, Fitzgerald is an exception. The flavor and the contrasts of his Jazz Age stories intrigues me. He is precise in his critique of post World War I America. He's harsh and bold in contrasting those who have and those who have not, and yet I feel the emptiness in h Finished on Jul 28, 2014 Flappers and Philosophers (1920) by F. Scott Fitzgerald hardcover Flappers and Philosophers, first published in 1920, marked Fitzgerald's entry into the short story arena. As a rule, I'm not taken with short stories; but, Fitzgerald is an exception. The flavor and the contrasts of his Jazz Age stories intrigues me. He is precise in his critique of post World War I America. He's harsh and bold in contrasting those who have and those who have not, and yet I feel the emptiness in his representation of wealth. In his life, he exercises no discretion in spending, partying and globe trotting with Zelda, who is consumed with trouble and woe. He provides, for me, an interesting literary sketch of that period. 4 ★

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.