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There was a thunderous crack. Lydia felt the ship shudder beneath her feet, and heard the buildings lining the wharf rattle. She jerked around so hard that the baby lurched within her, jabbing her sharply with pain. For a moment, she could only stare, not comprehending. The sound had come from the harbor's mouth. For a moment there was nothing to see, just the mass of ice There was a thunderous crack. Lydia felt the ship shudder beneath her feet, and heard the buildings lining the wharf rattle. She jerked around so hard that the baby lurched within her, jabbing her sharply with pain. For a moment, she could only stare, not comprehending. The sound had come from the harbor's mouth. For a moment there was nothing to see, just the mass of ice blocking their way. Above and behind her she heard the captain shouting, “Every man to his post! To your posts!” Then, to everyone's utter amazement, the ice jam began to crack. A seam of dark water began to open, piercing first the base, then the wall of ice. It was as if hell itself were being pried open to make way for them. This is just one of the many exciting events depicted in this book, the second in the landmark multivolume series The Work and the Glory. Like a Fire Is Burning continues the epic story of the fictional Benjamin Steed family and covers their participation in the unfolding events of the Restoration from 1830-1836. Swept up in the great drama as the infant Church expands and spreads westward into Ohio and Missouri, the Steeds become eyewitnesses of miracles as well as of the horrors of mob mayhem. Nathan and Lydia begin their married life, meeting new challenges and facing crises that test both their faith and their love; Mary Ann struggles with her feelings over her husband Benjamin's continued lack of spiritual response to the Restoration message; Jessica Steed, distraught by her apparent inability to have children, watches helpless as Joshua's bitter and destructive nature threatens to explode into violence. This book will surprise and intrigue many readers with the little-known true events it depicts and the involvement in them of well-known Latter-day Saints like Joesph and Emma Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, Parley P. Pratt, Brigham Young, Mary Elizabeth Rollins, and others. Author Gerald N. Lund first provides a solid historical basis, then weaves into it believable fictional characters as he portrays the tragedies and triumphs experienced in the early days of the restored Church. Through the Steed family, the author typifies the faith, the determination, the Spirit that burned like a fire in the hearts of early Latter-day Saints.


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There was a thunderous crack. Lydia felt the ship shudder beneath her feet, and heard the buildings lining the wharf rattle. She jerked around so hard that the baby lurched within her, jabbing her sharply with pain. For a moment, she could only stare, not comprehending. The sound had come from the harbor's mouth. For a moment there was nothing to see, just the mass of ice There was a thunderous crack. Lydia felt the ship shudder beneath her feet, and heard the buildings lining the wharf rattle. She jerked around so hard that the baby lurched within her, jabbing her sharply with pain. For a moment, she could only stare, not comprehending. The sound had come from the harbor's mouth. For a moment there was nothing to see, just the mass of ice blocking their way. Above and behind her she heard the captain shouting, “Every man to his post! To your posts!” Then, to everyone's utter amazement, the ice jam began to crack. A seam of dark water began to open, piercing first the base, then the wall of ice. It was as if hell itself were being pried open to make way for them. This is just one of the many exciting events depicted in this book, the second in the landmark multivolume series The Work and the Glory. Like a Fire Is Burning continues the epic story of the fictional Benjamin Steed family and covers their participation in the unfolding events of the Restoration from 1830-1836. Swept up in the great drama as the infant Church expands and spreads westward into Ohio and Missouri, the Steeds become eyewitnesses of miracles as well as of the horrors of mob mayhem. Nathan and Lydia begin their married life, meeting new challenges and facing crises that test both their faith and their love; Mary Ann struggles with her feelings over her husband Benjamin's continued lack of spiritual response to the Restoration message; Jessica Steed, distraught by her apparent inability to have children, watches helpless as Joshua's bitter and destructive nature threatens to explode into violence. This book will surprise and intrigue many readers with the little-known true events it depicts and the involvement in them of well-known Latter-day Saints like Joesph and Emma Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, Parley P. Pratt, Brigham Young, Mary Elizabeth Rollins, and others. Author Gerald N. Lund first provides a solid historical basis, then weaves into it believable fictional characters as he portrays the tragedies and triumphs experienced in the early days of the restored Church. Through the Steed family, the author typifies the faith, the determination, the Spirit that burned like a fire in the hearts of early Latter-day Saints.

30 review for Like a Fire is Burning

  1. 5 out of 5

    One Man Book Club

    The United States of America is the country founded by seekers of freedom from oppressive governments. But did you know the Mormon Church, born on April 6th, 1830 in New York State, was forced with violence from New York, to Ohio, to Missouri, to Illinois, and ultimately west across the plains and over the Rocky Mountains—because of their beliefs? The governor of Missouri actually issued an official declaration that all Mormons were to be driven from the state or exterminated. It has always been The United States of America is the country founded by seekers of freedom from oppressive governments. But did you know the Mormon Church, born on April 6th, 1830 in New York State, was forced with violence from New York, to Ohio, to Missouri, to Illinois, and ultimately west across the plains and over the Rocky Mountains—because of their beliefs? The governor of Missouri actually issued an official declaration that all Mormons were to be driven from the state or exterminated. It has always been ironic to me that the first Mormons actually had to leave the United States—the country founded on freedom—and travel 1300 miles before they were able find a place where they could peacefully worship. This is the story found in the 9 volume series The Work and the Glory, by Gerald Lund. 5600 pages—exactly—in 32 days. That's what it took for me to read all 9 volumes of The Work and the Glory. Along the way I kept promising a grand review of the entire series once I finished book 9. Now that I've closed the cover on the last page of the last book, I feel a bit lost for words. I want to share what I learned, how I felt, what I liked, what annoyed me, what brought on the happy tears, and what caused the sad tears. I'm quite certain no one wants to read a review as long as the series itself, but I'm afraid that's what it's going to take. So how do I do this? What do I say? How do I squeeze all these thoughts and feelings into a book review? I dunno. Let’s find out. . . . The Work and the Glory is historical fiction. The historical part is thorough, accurate, well researched, and well documented. The books chronicle the incredible, inspiring, often tragic, always miraculous, and (to us Mormons) deeply meaningful first 20 years of existence of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Book one begins in 1827, just before Joseph Smith is to retrieve the Golden Plates that will become The Book of Mormon. Book nine ends in 1847, a few months after Brigham Young leads 12,000 Mormon Pioneers from Nauvoo, IL to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake. The fiction part is engaging, well written, and breathes life into the historical events. Through the eyes of the fictional-but-representative-of-the-time Steed Family, we become first hand witnesses to all of the major events surrounding the Restoration (as it’s known within the Church). The Steeds meet Joseph Smith shortly after moving to Palmyra, New York in 1927, and soon they find themselves involved with all the peoples, places, and events those familiar with the history of the LDS Church will quickly recognize. Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdry, the Whitmer’s, Brigham Young, Parly P. Pratt, Herber C. Kimball, Emma Smith, Hyrum Smith. April 6th, 1830, the Grandin Press, the Sacred Grove, Hill Cumorah, the Kirtland Temple, Haun’s Mill, Liberty Jail, the Nauvoo Temple, Carthage Jail. Mission calls, the law of consecration, plural marriage, the Kirtland Safety Society, extermination order, martyrdom, the trek West, the Donnor Party, the Mormon Battalion. Palmyra, Kirtland, Independence, Far West, Nauvoo, Carthage, Winter Quarters, the Salt Lake Valley. Conversion, apostasy, persecution, miracles, revelations, visitations, resilience, tragedy, joy, and finally, peace and rest. The Steeds are part of it all. For me, the best part of The Work and the Glory is the way becoming invested in the lives of the Steed Family makes history personal. Now, instead of just knowing the facts surrounding a historical event, I have an idea of what it was like to actually be a part of that event. What did it feel like to hear Joseph’s testimony straight from his own mouth? What was it like to be told to leave your lives in Palmyra and follow the Church to Kirtland? Can I really imagine the terror of the hateful mobs driving us from every place we worked to start a new life? How about the joy of being there when the Kirtland Temple was dedicated? Cutting stone for the Nauvoo Temple? What would I have thought on the great day of healing when Joseph rose from his sick bed of malaria and healed so many others who were sick? What was it like to ride in a wagon across Iowa and Wyoming? How did it feel to watch your children leave bloody footprints in the snow after being forced at gunpoint from Far West? What about when Joseph was killed? What did it feel like to witness Brigham Young suddenly look and sound like Joseph on that day in Nauvoo? And on and on. After all the trials, I feel like I caught a glimpse of their joy and relief to finally reach the Salt Lake Valley, where they would be out of reach of their enemies. I’m a firm believer that the best books are the ones that make you feel, and there is a lot of feeling to be felt in reading The Work and the Glory. As literature, the books are engaging and well written—but packed full of Mormon cheesiness. The cheesiness wasn’t too distracting for me, however, thanks to the strength of the characters. I really cared about the Steeds and I loved watching their family grow through both sorrow and joy over the course of 20 years. It was also fun to read about my own pioneer ancestors as the Steeds even interacted with some of those that I am actually descended from. Mostly, I feel proud of my heritage. The first members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints had the faith and courage to do and endure impossible things. I feel steeled up more than ever before to carry on with the work they started and to live my life with as much faith and courage as I can find in myself. I want them to look down on me from heaven and be proud that I am carrying on their legacy. See, now I’m caught up in Mormon cheesiness! But, what can I say? It’s how I feel after reading The Work and the Glory. I recommend these books to everyone, especially lovers of American History and members or friends of the LDS Church. For non-Mormons especially, I think reading a detailed history of the LDS church such as this would go a long way in helping you understand better what makes us tick. Happy Reading! Dan

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Overall, I really enjoyed reading this book. I have to admit though that it felt slow in some places and I had to force myself to sit down with the book and keep reading at times. I think this was due to the fact that I felt the book didn’t really have a plot - it was more like reading about the characters day to day life and I didn’t have a sense as to where the storyline was going. I did find myself most interested in the story of Jessica and Joshua and I am interested to learn what becomes of Overall, I really enjoyed reading this book. I have to admit though that it felt slow in some places and I had to force myself to sit down with the book and keep reading at times. I think this was due to the fact that I felt the book didn’t really have a plot - it was more like reading about the characters day to day life and I didn’t have a sense as to where the storyline was going. I did find myself most interested in the story of Jessica and Joshua and I am interested to learn what becomes of Joshua. The second half of the book I seemed to enjoy a lot more and loved reading about actual church history events. With all that being said, I again enjoyed this book and would recommend it to others.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Williams

    This book is the second book within the Work and the Glory series, and it was amazing. This book is an amazing example as to what a sequel book should be like. This book shows more hard trials that the now married Lydia and Nathan have to go through along with the trials that Joseph and Emma go through too. This book creates a whole new setting in Kirtland, Ohio where the lord has asked Joseph to take the Saints. When they try to go new challenges arise and people get hurt and when they finally This book is the second book within the Work and the Glory series, and it was amazing. This book is an amazing example as to what a sequel book should be like. This book shows more hard trials that the now married Lydia and Nathan have to go through along with the trials that Joseph and Emma go through too. This book creates a whole new setting in Kirtland, Ohio where the lord has asked Joseph to take the Saints. When they try to go new challenges arise and people get hurt and when they finally settle down there are even more challenges that await. Life gets hard but the people never give up hope. The saints follow Joseph in his teachings and start to build a church. Benjamin Steed, Nathan's dad has always been against the church but until he gets a realization from a neighbor that follows Josephs teachings he was against the church. But he recieves a warm feeling inside, sells the farm and follows his family down to Ohio. There he slowly starts to fall into the church and he finally coverts. This was wonderful news to everyone. They start to build a temple and with Bejamins help they complete it in less than 2 years. Then more trouble shows up and people get hurt once more. There is death and miracles, and triumph shows through. This book was amazing, and once again the Historical facts are proven true with even better additions of fiction added on. I really loved this book and reccomend this to anyone who loves historical fiction and again more Romance that makes the book even better.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Slow in many spots, but I loved all the history throughout the book. Joshua is infuriating but I have hopes for his return to the family.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andralynn

    I enjoyed this book much more than the first this time around. I just get so much more invested when the full persecution of the Saints begins. I’m always astounded by what the early Saints endured. I will forever wonder if I have the faith and the strength those Saints had. Would I have stayed faithful in their position, or would I have denied my testimony? Part of what I love about this book is seeing the really dark and ugly side of Joshua. It deepens his character. I really enjoy the juxtapos I enjoyed this book much more than the first this time around. I just get so much more invested when the full persecution of the Saints begins. I’m always astounded by what the early Saints endured. I will forever wonder if I have the faith and the strength those Saints had. Would I have stayed faithful in their position, or would I have denied my testimony? Part of what I love about this book is seeing the really dark and ugly side of Joshua. It deepens his character. I really enjoy the juxtaposition of his views versus his family’s views. It makes his redemption later in the series so much more satisfying. I also really enjoyed the struggles Nathan and Lydia had. They felt authentic, and it’s nice to see the flaws in even the best characters. Reading the account of the miraculous events at the dedication of the Kirtland temple left me feeling a burning in my chest. The events sounds crazy and unthinkable, but I know that they truly happened. The Lord was there that day and His Spirit was poured out on the Saints. I can’t help but wonder what it would be like to have such amazing spiritual experiences.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

    I was somewhat resistant to the idea of reading these books - I didn't take the time to really see what they were all about, I just assumed that since they seemed so 'trendy' at the time, they would probably be 'light' reading or even 'corny.' I was SO wrong... and I'm SO glad that I realized that if my mom was enjoying them so much and recommending them to me, they must be worthwhile. This series, along with the Kent Family Chronicles (by John Jakes, about the United States), made me fall in lov I was somewhat resistant to the idea of reading these books - I didn't take the time to really see what they were all about, I just assumed that since they seemed so 'trendy' at the time, they would probably be 'light' reading or even 'corny.' I was SO wrong... and I'm SO glad that I realized that if my mom was enjoying them so much and recommending them to me, they must be worthwhile. This series, along with the Kent Family Chronicles (by John Jakes, about the United States), made me fall in love with historical fiction. In this case, it was not only my knowledge of Church history events that was increased, but my understanding of those events. When I read about all of the people and events in story form, chronological order, and in a cultural and historical context, I felt that I had a much clearer 'big picture' than ever before. Reading this series was such a wonderful way to increase both my knowledge of the Church and my testimony of the gospel.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    This starts out with the saints moving to Kirtland and ending with the Kirtland Temple dedication. There is also the parts about the mobs in Missouri and Zion's Camp. I liked the first one better. But I did enjoy some of the history of this book. They were all stories I had heard before but I had never made the connection of all of them together with the chronology of the church. Stories such as lying down with a snake and it not biting him while in Zion's Camp. And the one where they found the L This starts out with the saints moving to Kirtland and ending with the Kirtland Temple dedication. There is also the parts about the mobs in Missouri and Zion's Camp. I liked the first one better. But I did enjoy some of the history of this book. They were all stories I had heard before but I had never made the connection of all of them together with the chronology of the church. Stories such as lying down with a snake and it not biting him while in Zion's Camp. And the one where they found the Lamanite bones and Joseph Smith told them his name. I also really enjoyed the parts with the Kirtland Temple dedication. I did not know much at all about that. This book also had a section in the back that explained the parts that were true in the story vs which were fiction. It came with sources which I appreciated. I felt the fiction stories lacking in luster in this book. Book one made the history come alive better.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    I felt like there was a lot more historical stuff in this book than in the first one. I would just be getting into the "good" stuff (a.k.a. the stuff about the characters who aren't actually real) when Lund would throw in another one of his historical essays that would mess up the flow of the story. I guess I'm not not a fan of this type of historical fiction. I'd prefer the historical stuff be in the background and the characters be the most important part of the story, but this series is the o I felt like there was a lot more historical stuff in this book than in the first one. I would just be getting into the "good" stuff (a.k.a. the stuff about the characters who aren't actually real) when Lund would throw in another one of his historical essays that would mess up the flow of the story. I guess I'm not not a fan of this type of historical fiction. I'd prefer the historical stuff be in the background and the characters be the most important part of the story, but this series is the other way around. Oh well. Obviously I still like the series enough to be reading it my 3rd or 4th time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Though I always love his books and there are many parts of this one I really enjoyed it took me almost a year to read and to me that is saying something if I'm not excited to pick up a book and finish it. It maybe because I've seen the movies and though a little different stuck to the plot. So maybe on book 4 I'll enjoy them more thoroughly. The story line is good but again it took me forever and it kept getting set on the back burner even when I didn't have other books to read. So it could be 3 Though I always love his books and there are many parts of this one I really enjoyed it took me almost a year to read and to me that is saying something if I'm not excited to pick up a book and finish it. It maybe because I've seen the movies and though a little different stuck to the plot. So maybe on book 4 I'll enjoy them more thoroughly. The story line is good but again it took me forever and it kept getting set on the back burner even when I didn't have other books to read. So it could be 3.5 stars but goodreads doesn't give that as an option.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    Reread August 2018 —— Reread October 2016 —— I learn so many things each time I read these books. It's interesting that certain character challenges this third time around meant more to me as I've had more life experiences of my own since my last reading. Reread August 2018 —— Reread October 2016 —— I learn so many things each time I read these books. It's interesting that certain character challenges this third time around meant more to me as I've had more life experiences of my own since my last reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    This is the second time I have read The Work and the Glory. I am reading it now to a friend in the Nursing Home. We are thoroughly enjoying the experience together. I am quite sure, I am getting more out of it this time. Reading aloud has it perks.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Fielding

    I am loving these series! This particular book made me sad because of all the persecution towards the Saints and Joseph Smith. It absolutely broke my heart. But I also can't help admire all those who stood as a witness to God. Super great book! I am loving these series! This particular book made me sad because of all the persecution towards the Saints and Joseph Smith. It absolutely broke my heart. But I also can't help admire all those who stood as a witness to God. Super great book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jamileh

    Good but not as good as the first. The Chuch history is very cool, but seemed to get a little slow for me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    i really enjoyed this whole series

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sidney

    Beautiful historical fiction.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ami

    (When I first read this series twenty some years ago I would have rated this 4-4.5 stars. Rereading it this year I rate it at 3.5 stars. But I will stick with the original 4 star rating.) Since this year at church and in seminary we are discussing Church History, I thought rereading these novels would be a great way to remind myself of some of the smaller and lesser known stories within the grand, overarching history. And I wasn't wrong- the books in this series do a great job at showing those sm (When I first read this series twenty some years ago I would have rated this 4-4.5 stars. Rereading it this year I rate it at 3.5 stars. But I will stick with the original 4 star rating.) Since this year at church and in seminary we are discussing Church History, I thought rereading these novels would be a great way to remind myself of some of the smaller and lesser known stories within the grand, overarching history. And I wasn't wrong- the books in this series do a great job at showing those smaller moment. However, with this re-read, I realized that Mr. Lund's writing has a few more flaws than I noticed originally. The pacing is uneven, the fictional characters can be a bit cliched in their renderings, and the plot can feel a bit forced. Yet, Mr. Lund does a decent job incorporating a fictional family into actual historical events without altering true facts or giving the book a robotic, textbook tone. Despite knowing how events actually unfold, there is still suspense and mystery and the reader can become quite invested. And that is no small feat for an author.

  17. 5 out of 5

    M

    I read this book during our family'es Church history vacation to New York and Ohio. I read it immediately upon finishing the first book. Reading it for the history was perfect and helped me not mind the "Sunday School lessons" so much. I had my 14-year-old son listen to an audio recording of the book before the trip and during the travel time to get to New York. It helped him appreciate the sites we visited such as Fayette where the Church was organized, the Newel K. Whitney Store in Kirtland, a I read this book during our family'es Church history vacation to New York and Ohio. I read it immediately upon finishing the first book. Reading it for the history was perfect and helped me not mind the "Sunday School lessons" so much. I had my 14-year-old son listen to an audio recording of the book before the trip and during the travel time to get to New York. It helped him appreciate the sites we visited such as Fayette where the Church was organized, the Newel K. Whitney Store in Kirtland, and the Kirtland Temple. He also learned stories like the one of Lucy Mack Smith getting through the ice dams at the Buffalo Harbor. Knowing that story and then seeing the Erie Canal, Niagara Falls, the Buffalo Harbor, and the Fairport Harbor in Ohio made that story live, just as seeing other sites did the same thing to other stories.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie Jones

    Again, these books are a phenomenal way to learn church history and better understand the context of the Doctrine and Covenants, but they're not the best written books in the world :) but I can't deny liking the story! I could see, however, in the hands of opposers to the church, these books would not be well received because of how they handle certain topics. If you have a testimony of Joseph Smith already and want to know more about him, read these. Same goes for having a belief in revelation, Again, these books are a phenomenal way to learn church history and better understand the context of the Doctrine and Covenants, but they're not the best written books in the world :) but I can't deny liking the story! I could see, however, in the hands of opposers to the church, these books would not be well received because of how they handle certain topics. If you have a testimony of Joseph Smith already and want to know more about him, read these. Same goes for having a belief in revelation, or the Spirit, or prayer. As with anything spiritual, however, the opposition will not likely be converted if they go in to something skeptical, and I could see how these books could inspire the skeptics to raise eyebrows, which makes me sad because as a LDS woman, I can see such great beauty and inspiration in this story.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    *3.8 that ending tho, was great. my problem was that stupid Gerald N. Lund is probably the most sexist author i’ve ever read. but, his sexism is subtle. he makes EVERY SINGLE WOMAN cry ever ten seconds about the most dumbest things. and he makes it known that none of them have done any labour work. it’s stupid. i know that Emma helped out a little bit with the labour. but, noooooo. the only thing women can do is sew and cry and give birth to babies. also, the fact that the only men in this book w *3.8 that ending tho, was great. my problem was that stupid Gerald N. Lund is probably the most sexist author i’ve ever read. but, his sexism is subtle. he makes EVERY SINGLE WOMAN cry ever ten seconds about the most dumbest things. and he makes it known that none of them have done any labour work. it’s stupid. i know that Emma helped out a little bit with the labour. but, noooooo. the only thing women can do is sew and cry and give birth to babies. also, the fact that the only men in this book with good personality are Nathan and Benjamin (mind you, the ONLY men that have cried in this series so far), is just dumb. they’re the fake ones in this story. even joseph is kind of obnoxious. and he’s real.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I'm rereading these books in preparation for the next General Conference. I'm loving them just as much the second time. I had forgotten so many details of church history, and it's wonderful to be reminded of these miracles and also many tragic events. It amazes me what the early saints endured for their faith. Such sacrifice! It's truly unbelievable that anyone would treat someone the way Joseph and the early members of the Church were treated. Can you imagine driving women and children our of t I'm rereading these books in preparation for the next General Conference. I'm loving them just as much the second time. I had forgotten so many details of church history, and it's wonderful to be reminded of these miracles and also many tragic events. It amazes me what the early saints endured for their faith. Such sacrifice! It's truly unbelievable that anyone would treat someone the way Joseph and the early members of the Church were treated. Can you imagine driving women and children our of their homes in the middle of the night in the freezing cold? I am also awed by the rapid growth of the Church. It's amazing how much it grew in just a few years.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kierstin

    I admittedly liked the first one a little more, but this series has caught me by surprise by sparking my interest in historical LDS events when before it used to be like a modern Old Testament to me through its confusing turn of events and many moving parts. It looks like the power of fiction wins out again for me because I have enjoyed it a good deal more through the eyes of a main cast of fictional characters. Some aspects are a little too cheesy for me by clearly seeking out emotional respons I admittedly liked the first one a little more, but this series has caught me by surprise by sparking my interest in historical LDS events when before it used to be like a modern Old Testament to me through its confusing turn of events and many moving parts. It looks like the power of fiction wins out again for me because I have enjoyed it a good deal more through the eyes of a main cast of fictional characters. Some aspects are a little too cheesy for me by clearly seeking out emotional responses from the readers, but I enjoy what I've gleaned about this focus of history so far.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Summer Meyers

    So I think I've figured it out. Lund is a great writer but his dialogues are weak which is why his books appeal to me less as an adult as they did back in high school. The story is compelling, and the historical portion well done. But something happens as soon as the characters start talking to each other. It's an easy read, and a fun way to understand church history, which makes them well worth it. So I think I've figured it out. Lund is a great writer but his dialogues are weak which is why his books appeal to me less as an adult as they did back in high school. The story is compelling, and the historical portion well done. But something happens as soon as the characters start talking to each other. It's an easy read, and a fun way to understand church history, which makes them well worth it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patti

    ‘Like a Fire is Burning’ covers the restoration of the Church of Jesus Christ from 1830-1836. Persecution, prejudice, brutal attacks of innocent members and church leaders are rampant. The faith of early members is amazing! Members are tested and tried beyond anything those of us today couldn’t imagine. The final chapters see how the Kirtland Temple is built completed, something the saints have been striving to do. The miracles of its completion and dedication are astounding.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This is a hard book to read, the persecution of Mormons is a shameful part of America's past. It's a triumph of ignorance and intolerance over freedom. Even knowing the history before starting the book, it's hard to go through these things with the characters. On the other hand, the story and writing were good, if not quite as strong as in the first book. This is a hard book to read, the persecution of Mormons is a shameful part of America's past. It's a triumph of ignorance and intolerance over freedom. Even knowing the history before starting the book, it's hard to go through these things with the characters. On the other hand, the story and writing were good, if not quite as strong as in the first book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachelle

    I enjoyed this book more than the first one in the series. I like the historical fiction but also find it annoying when all of a sudden a large section of historical facts is thrown in just as the story is developing more. My favorite part of this story the continual development of the fictional characters. I am interested to see what happens to them in the next book in this series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Steve Center

    The Adventures of the Steed family continue. The writing continues to be excellent and the story is engaging. I haven't had any difficulty distinguishing historical fact from the writers creative ideas. People who are not Mormon in the story are treated with respect. The Adventures of the Steed family continue. The writing continues to be excellent and the story is engaging. I haven't had any difficulty distinguishing historical fact from the writers creative ideas. People who are not Mormon in the story are treated with respect.

  27. 4 out of 5

    David Sanders

    Continued to enjoy a fictionalized retelling of the Restoration of the gospel. I am amazed by the experiences that people had in the early days and find myself wondering where we've gone wrong that such things seems so rare nowadays. Continued to enjoy a fictionalized retelling of the Restoration of the gospel. I am amazed by the experiences that people had in the early days and find myself wondering where we've gone wrong that such things seems so rare nowadays.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    I love the historical part of these books. It’s interesting to think of the sacrifices and situations that early members faced. As I read this book, it also made me think about how the Lord’s timetable for everyone is different. I like that.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

    I think I was even more engrossed in this Volume than the prior. The notes at the end separating fiction from fact was a helpful addition. The author started a more back and forth, or choppy, storyline...but I think it was to cover so many locations and narratives. I'm excited to start Volume 3! I think I was even more engrossed in this Volume than the prior. The notes at the end separating fiction from fact was a helpful addition. The author started a more back and forth, or choppy, storyline...but I think it was to cover so many locations and narratives. I'm excited to start Volume 3!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Hearing the reality of the persecution brings me to tears. I know this is a story, but the reality that this happened to real people is disturbing...yet inspiring as we look to the events in our own lives today.

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