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Will Your Next Mistake Be Fatal?: Avoiding the Chain of Mistakes That Can Destroy Your Organization

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Focuses on what catastrophes have in common - and how to keep them from happening to you. This title introduces M3: the first systematic approach to - managing mistakes, so they don't lead to disaster; building systems that prevent 'failure chains' from spiraling out of control; and reducing the impact and cost of the mistakes you do make. Focuses on what catastrophes have in common - and how to keep them from happening to you. This title introduces M3: the first systematic approach to - managing mistakes, so they don't lead to disaster; building systems that prevent 'failure chains' from spiraling out of control; and reducing the impact and cost of the mistakes you do make.


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Focuses on what catastrophes have in common - and how to keep them from happening to you. This title introduces M3: the first systematic approach to - managing mistakes, so they don't lead to disaster; building systems that prevent 'failure chains' from spiraling out of control; and reducing the impact and cost of the mistakes you do make. Focuses on what catastrophes have in common - and how to keep them from happening to you. This title introduces M3: the first systematic approach to - managing mistakes, so they don't lead to disaster; building systems that prevent 'failure chains' from spiraling out of control; and reducing the impact and cost of the mistakes you do make.

33 review for Will Your Next Mistake Be Fatal?: Avoiding the Chain of Mistakes That Can Destroy Your Organization

  1. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    I think so highly of this book that I listed it as the best book of the year in my annual "Best Books of the Year" column that I write for the online "Journal of Object Technology" (JOT). JOT is a journal written for people who use object-oriented technologies to teach computer science and develop large software projects. The process of creating a program that has millions of lines of source code is a very complex one, there are millions of ways you can fail and only a few ways that you can succ I think so highly of this book that I listed it as the best book of the year in my annual "Best Books of the Year" column that I write for the online "Journal of Object Technology" (JOT). JOT is a journal written for people who use object-oriented technologies to teach computer science and develop large software projects. The process of creating a program that has millions of lines of source code is a very complex one, there are millions of ways you can fail and only a few ways that you can succeed. The main point is that catastrophic mistakes are generally not due to one big error, but are the consequence of a series of small errors that reinforce each other. Major historical failures such as the sinking of the Titanic, the meltdown at Three Mile Island, plane crashes, business failures such as the collapse of Enron and the associated destruction of Arthur Anderson are all examined in detail. The failures can generally be placed in one of the following categories: *) Failure to question an authority figure. *) Not trusting hard data. *) Trusting "hard" data too much. *) Believing only the data that agrees with your beliefs. *) Tolerating violations of proven procedure. *) Lack of adequate training and experience. *) Arrogance or a feeling of infallibility. It amazed me to read how in most cases, the correction of even one of the small mistakes in the chain could have led to a minimization or avoidance of the catastrophe. There are also examples of successful recoveries from catastrophic events. In 1982, several people died due to a tampering with the product Tylenol after it left the factories. The manufacturer, Johnson & Johnson, immediately engaged in a total recall and then reintroduced the product in a tamper-proof package. This reassured the public and while they took an immediate loss, the company recovered very quickly, maintained and increased their level of public trust. At some point, nearly every company is faced with a crisis that can make or break it. Given that there are generally so many small errors in the chain, in most cases many people can act to prevent a failure. By reading this book, you can increase your chances of being on the make side of the ledger. This review also appears on Amazon

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim Martin

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy Krauss

  5. 4 out of 5

    G00dread

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alberto

  7. 5 out of 5

    Larry

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  11. 4 out of 5

    Wiktor Dynarski

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Scary title. The problem with risk assessment is getting out of conventional view.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tara

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  16. 5 out of 5

    Thad

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chandrashekhar Buty

  19. 4 out of 5

    Praveen

  20. 4 out of 5

    Darren

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maxwell Mitchell

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andy Atzert

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Deltuvia

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sudhir

  26. 5 out of 5

    Beyza G├╝nyaz

  27. 4 out of 5

    Siriluck Rattanawaropas

  28. 4 out of 5

    Spage

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt Holland

  30. 5 out of 5

    Indraneal Balasubramanian

  31. 4 out of 5

    Willy Alvim

  32. 5 out of 5

    Arul Bagga

  33. 5 out of 5

    Vinod Niranjan Kumar

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