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Flowers Don't Scream

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Barbara Barton has been brutally murdered in a sleepy, middle class village, leaving the police baffled and the residents shocked and suspicious of one other. The story is told from the viewpoint of Diane Whittaker, who interacts with each of the different characters as the story progresses and leads us to discover that many of the villagers hold a motive for killing the v Barbara Barton has been brutally murdered in a sleepy, middle class village, leaving the police baffled and the residents shocked and suspicious of one other. The story is told from the viewpoint of Diane Whittaker, who interacts with each of the different characters as the story progresses and leads us to discover that many of the villagers hold a motive for killing the victim. When Diane meets Chief Inspector Michael Davies, the attraction between them is immediate and powerful, despite the fact she is married. As the story unfolds, it becomes apparent she is unhappily married to a bitter and sarcastic man, whereas the CI is in possession of a mischievous sense of humour and becomes more and more attractive to Diane as the murder enquiry progresses. Three of Diane’s friends confess to her that they suspect their husbands of having had affairs with the victim and one in particular admits she thinks her husband is the murderer. Then, Diane is informed her husband has been accused of theft. Stunned by what she has been told, she breaks into the accuser’s house under cover of darkness to try and find any information and uncover the truth. She is arrested by police and interrogated by the CI, who teaches her a lesson she’ll never forget. To her surprise, he then releases her and keeps her misdemeanour a secret. A series of events at which Diane and the CI meet ensures their relationship develops at a very swift pace and good humour shows different, more private sides to them both. But every time they try to consummate their relationship, someone appears to interrupt them. Diane compensates by fantasising graphic sex scenes with him. The pool where Diane teaches is tampered with and closed for tests. No motive can be found, but evidence incriminates her husband once more. When she is informed by her local paper shop that her newspapers have been cancelled forever by someone claiming Diane is not going to be around in the future, she realises things have taken a sinister turn for her. On the next morning, Diane learns that one of her closest friends has become the second murder victim. Against police advice, Diane goes for an incident free morning walk but, upon her return, someone has broken into the house and left a trail of terrifying havoc. The CI is furious with her and graphically describes the degrading and sordid state in which the murdered women have been found. Horribly shocked and revolted, Diane promises to do as she’s requested by the police and twenty four hour police protection is arranged. The murderer turns bolder and starts phoning Diane, even though there’s a policeman in her house all day and night. The next day, a third murder is discovered and the murderer actually has the temerity to push a note through the letter box. His proximity is unnerving enough, but the message is alarming. ‘Dear Mrs Whittaker, I want to inform you that you are next.’ A brain storming conversation over coffee with the CI, Diane and her best friend leads them to suspect a particular villager of the murders, though they have only circumstantial evidence. Diane also has to reveal something awful that she has kept a secret, even from her best friend. On the night the murder is expected to happen, a plan is put in place to ensnare the murderer and later in the evening, an intruder is actually arrested on the premises. The peace is shattered, however, when the CI phones to inform her they’ve not arrested the murderer – only a petty housebreaker. As she speaks, someone hurtles towards her, grabs her from behind and presses a knife into her throat. Soon, the body count reaches four and evidence proves there are two murderers, not one.


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Barbara Barton has been brutally murdered in a sleepy, middle class village, leaving the police baffled and the residents shocked and suspicious of one other. The story is told from the viewpoint of Diane Whittaker, who interacts with each of the different characters as the story progresses and leads us to discover that many of the villagers hold a motive for killing the v Barbara Barton has been brutally murdered in a sleepy, middle class village, leaving the police baffled and the residents shocked and suspicious of one other. The story is told from the viewpoint of Diane Whittaker, who interacts with each of the different characters as the story progresses and leads us to discover that many of the villagers hold a motive for killing the victim. When Diane meets Chief Inspector Michael Davies, the attraction between them is immediate and powerful, despite the fact she is married. As the story unfolds, it becomes apparent she is unhappily married to a bitter and sarcastic man, whereas the CI is in possession of a mischievous sense of humour and becomes more and more attractive to Diane as the murder enquiry progresses. Three of Diane’s friends confess to her that they suspect their husbands of having had affairs with the victim and one in particular admits she thinks her husband is the murderer. Then, Diane is informed her husband has been accused of theft. Stunned by what she has been told, she breaks into the accuser’s house under cover of darkness to try and find any information and uncover the truth. She is arrested by police and interrogated by the CI, who teaches her a lesson she’ll never forget. To her surprise, he then releases her and keeps her misdemeanour a secret. A series of events at which Diane and the CI meet ensures their relationship develops at a very swift pace and good humour shows different, more private sides to them both. But every time they try to consummate their relationship, someone appears to interrupt them. Diane compensates by fantasising graphic sex scenes with him. The pool where Diane teaches is tampered with and closed for tests. No motive can be found, but evidence incriminates her husband once more. When she is informed by her local paper shop that her newspapers have been cancelled forever by someone claiming Diane is not going to be around in the future, she realises things have taken a sinister turn for her. On the next morning, Diane learns that one of her closest friends has become the second murder victim. Against police advice, Diane goes for an incident free morning walk but, upon her return, someone has broken into the house and left a trail of terrifying havoc. The CI is furious with her and graphically describes the degrading and sordid state in which the murdered women have been found. Horribly shocked and revolted, Diane promises to do as she’s requested by the police and twenty four hour police protection is arranged. The murderer turns bolder and starts phoning Diane, even though there’s a policeman in her house all day and night. The next day, a third murder is discovered and the murderer actually has the temerity to push a note through the letter box. His proximity is unnerving enough, but the message is alarming. ‘Dear Mrs Whittaker, I want to inform you that you are next.’ A brain storming conversation over coffee with the CI, Diane and her best friend leads them to suspect a particular villager of the murders, though they have only circumstantial evidence. Diane also has to reveal something awful that she has kept a secret, even from her best friend. On the night the murder is expected to happen, a plan is put in place to ensnare the murderer and later in the evening, an intruder is actually arrested on the premises. The peace is shattered, however, when the CI phones to inform her they’ve not arrested the murderer – only a petty housebreaker. As she speaks, someone hurtles towards her, grabs her from behind and presses a knife into her throat. Soon, the body count reaches four and evidence proves there are two murderers, not one.

8 review for Flowers Don't Scream

  1. 4 out of 5

    P.S. Winn

    When Barbara Barton is murdered the small village is in shock, although a lot of women didn't care for Barbara who was known to fool around with married me. Inspector Davies is following the clues to find the murderer when several other women also end up dead. Diane Whittaker is receiving threatening notes from the killer and it is up to The Inspector to keep her safe. This book is a good read, although a bit of slower pace at times,it is enjoyable. It reminds me of a Doris Day movie and I am a When Barbara Barton is murdered the small village is in shock, although a lot of women didn't care for Barbara who was known to fool around with married me. Inspector Davies is following the clues to find the murderer when several other women also end up dead. Diane Whittaker is receiving threatening notes from the killer and it is up to The Inspector to keep her safe. This book is a good read, although a bit of slower pace at times,it is enjoyable. It reminds me of a Doris Day movie and I am a fan of those, so good job.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jen Tee

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christine Stoddart

  4. 5 out of 5

    Di

    Absolutely ridiculous.

  5. 4 out of 5

    grumpyoldbird

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ute

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy Czapp

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