website statistics Training and Racing with a Power Meter - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Training and Racing with a Power Meter

Availability: Ready to download

Hunter Allen and Andy Coggan, PhD have completely revised the book that made power meters understandable for amateur and professional cyclists and triathletes. Power meters have become essential tools for competitive cyclists and triathletes. No training tool can unlock as much speed and endurance as a power meter--for those who understand how to interpret their data. A pow Hunter Allen and Andy Coggan, PhD have completely revised the book that made power meters understandable for amateur and professional cyclists and triathletes. Power meters have become essential tools for competitive cyclists and triathletes. No training tool can unlock as much speed and endurance as a power meter--for those who understand how to interpret their data. A power meter displays and records exactly how much energy a cyclist expends, which lends unprecedented insight into that rider's abilities and fitness. With the proper baseline data, a cyclist can use a power meter to determine race strategy, pacing, and tactics. "Training and Racing with a Power Meter" makes it possible to exploit the incredible usefulness of the power meter by explaining how to profile strengths and weaknesses, measure fitness and fatigue, optimize workouts, time race readiness, and race using power. This new edition: Enables athletes to predict future performance and time peak formIntroduces fatigue profiling, a new testing method to pinpoint weaknessesIncludes two training plans to raise functional threshold power and time peaks for race dayOffers 75 power-based workouts tuned for specific training goalsThis updated edition also includes new case studies, a full chapter on triathlon training and racing, and improved 2-color charts and tables throughout. "Training and Racing with a Power Meter," will continue to be the definitive guide to the most important training tool ever developed for endurance sports.


Compare

Hunter Allen and Andy Coggan, PhD have completely revised the book that made power meters understandable for amateur and professional cyclists and triathletes. Power meters have become essential tools for competitive cyclists and triathletes. No training tool can unlock as much speed and endurance as a power meter--for those who understand how to interpret their data. A pow Hunter Allen and Andy Coggan, PhD have completely revised the book that made power meters understandable for amateur and professional cyclists and triathletes. Power meters have become essential tools for competitive cyclists and triathletes. No training tool can unlock as much speed and endurance as a power meter--for those who understand how to interpret their data. A power meter displays and records exactly how much energy a cyclist expends, which lends unprecedented insight into that rider's abilities and fitness. With the proper baseline data, a cyclist can use a power meter to determine race strategy, pacing, and tactics. "Training and Racing with a Power Meter" makes it possible to exploit the incredible usefulness of the power meter by explaining how to profile strengths and weaknesses, measure fitness and fatigue, optimize workouts, time race readiness, and race using power. This new edition: Enables athletes to predict future performance and time peak formIntroduces fatigue profiling, a new testing method to pinpoint weaknessesIncludes two training plans to raise functional threshold power and time peaks for race dayOffers 75 power-based workouts tuned for specific training goalsThis updated edition also includes new case studies, a full chapter on triathlon training and racing, and improved 2-color charts and tables throughout. "Training and Racing with a Power Meter," will continue to be the definitive guide to the most important training tool ever developed for endurance sports.

30 review for Training and Racing with a Power Meter

  1. 5 out of 5

    Damon

    This book wasn't everything I wanted it to be but it achieved the basic function I bought it for: to get me to use my power meter more effectively and with some understanding. For example, just explaining Training Stress Scores and Intensity Factors was extremely helpful and has added a new dimension to my cycling analysis. Overall, however, it's limited by a couple of factors. Firstly, the authors haven't really settled on a target audience or complexity level. They tell you what you can measure This book wasn't everything I wanted it to be but it achieved the basic function I bought it for: to get me to use my power meter more effectively and with some understanding. For example, just explaining Training Stress Scores and Intensity Factors was extremely helpful and has added a new dimension to my cycling analysis. Overall, however, it's limited by a couple of factors. Firstly, the authors haven't really settled on a target audience or complexity level. They tell you what you can measure, and how it is measured in significant mathematical detail. But often skim over why some measurement is useful. For example, what exactly do you want me to do with my crank arm torque measurement? Maybe it was me that was deficient, but it felt like the book. Secondly, this is really just a manual for using Training Peaks WKO+ software. Which is fine, but they should just say that and bin the introductory part where they review a bunch of different tools. Quite poor there. Thirdly, they should ignore the part about building a training plan, though I guess that would limit the market segment of this book. It's half-arsed and lacking. The authors are clearly in cahoots with Joe Friel (they are all partners in the same company) and The Cyclists Training Bible is far superior in terms of training planning, and indeed bangs on about the virtues of power measurement and indeed WKO+ throughout. Surely, then, these various authors should just team up, make it clear they all work for the same team, stick their label on these books and stop trying to pretend they're independent?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    In the 12 years since this book was first published (2006), cycling gadgetry - and technology in general - has undergone a massive amount of change. To put this in context, the iPhone did not exist when this book was written. It was a time when power meters were very rare and cost-prohibitive to most consumers, and we certainly didn't have things like smart trainers. Surely this book, along with power meters, were revolutionary for the cycling community, as was Allen and Coggan's research. They a In the 12 years since this book was first published (2006), cycling gadgetry - and technology in general - has undergone a massive amount of change. To put this in context, the iPhone did not exist when this book was written. It was a time when power meters were very rare and cost-prohibitive to most consumers, and we certainly didn't have things like smart trainers. Surely this book, along with power meters, were revolutionary for the cycling community, as was Allen and Coggan's research. They are forefathers of this field. However, I can't help but feel as if this book's time has past. I wanted to like it, but it felt superfluous in the world of smart trainers, bike computers, apps like TrainerRoad and Zwift to handle your training plans, etc. Metrics like FTP (and its associated power levels), TSS, IF, etc are very useful when training, though an entire book on them isn't necessary at this point - they aren't terribly complicated and there are quicker ways to learn about them. Finally, much of this book goes in depth about the tools provided by TrainingPeaks and WKO+. If you're mostly interested in learning about the metrics behind becoming a better cyclist, the focus on TrainingPeaks will annoy and bore you - it adds significant length to the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex Glagolev

    Книга рекомендована к прочтению увлеченным велоспортом людям. В книге понятным языком описаны основные термины, понятия и принципы организации тренировок с помощью измерителя мощности. После прочтения данных материалов вы поймете что за графики рисует вам Strava, научитесь находить свои слабые и сильные стороны не по ощущениям, а исходя из реальных данных. В идеале сможете получать больше пользы затрачивая меньше часов на тренировки. Могу сказать, что начинающие любители могут смело использовать Книга рекомендована к прочтению увлеченным велоспортом людям. В книге понятным языком описаны основные термины, понятия и принципы организации тренировок с помощью измерителя мощности. После прочтения данных материалов вы поймете что за графики рисует вам Strava, научитесь находить свои слабые и сильные стороны не по ощущениям, а исходя из реальных данных. В идеале сможете получать больше пользы затрачивая меньше часов на тренировки. Могу сказать, что начинающие любители могут смело использовать идущие в комплекте со Zwift/TrainerRoad тренировки, потому как они построены на научной базе которая описана в данном материале. Продвинутые любители и тренеры могут найти для себя много полезного материала по методологии анализа данных. В книге почти не затрагиваются физиология спортсмена, но есть рекомендации по литературе для изучения данного вопроса. Плюсы данной книги: Практичность, понятный язык изложения. Это хорошая стартовая площадка для начала изучения "умных", базирующихся на данных методологий тренировок. Минусы: Не покидает ощущение, что книга является рекламой для WKO+ (программное обеспечение для анализа тренировок). Кратко: Если абстрагироваться от рекламы WKO+, книга принесет много пользы. Рекомендую.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lars

    Best resource on using a Power Meter, but not good for triathletes I am a triathlete and I picked this book up to learn more ways to utilize power in my training. It turned out there weren't a lot of ways to do so: This book is focused mostly on road cyclists (not exclusively, but mostly). Unlike road cycling, triathlon does not include sprints or similiar things, making power profiling and the like rather useless for triathlon. The other major analysis tool they present is the quadrant analysis Best resource on using a Power Meter, but not good for triathletes I am a triathlete and I picked this book up to learn more ways to utilize power in my training. It turned out there weren't a lot of ways to do so: This book is focused mostly on road cyclists (not exclusively, but mostly). Unlike road cycling, triathlon does not include sprints or similiar things, making power profiling and the like rather useless for triathlon. The other major analysis tool they present is the quadrant analysis tool, which is just a very fancy way of checking whether you are pedaling at a high cadence. Whether this is actually better is debatable, so the usefulness of this analysis is questionable, too. The part specifically for triathlon is also not great, for example they still use the fingertip-drill, which is one of the few things most reputable coaches agree to be useless/harmless. So if you are a road cyclist, you can probably get quite a few interesting takeaways from this book. If you are a triathlete, this book provides little value over most general training books like The Triathlete's Training Bible: The World's Most Comprehensive Training Guide.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eron

    This is THE BOOK on power-based training, as far as I know. Even though I don't have access to a power meter because I don't bike, I loved brainstorming ways I might apply the thinking to my running. I skipped over some stuff that was more in the weeds, like using a power meter to pace during a race, but I suspect I'll go back and even read those sections. A valuable reference that I will purchase. This is THE BOOK on power-based training, as far as I know. Even though I don't have access to a power meter because I don't bike, I loved brainstorming ways I might apply the thinking to my running. I skipped over some stuff that was more in the weeds, like using a power meter to pace during a race, but I suspect I'll go back and even read those sections. A valuable reference that I will purchase.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mayara

    The book is a fair introduction to training with a power meter. Although it states that one will be able to correct train using a power meter and also comes with a list of workout options, the book does not discuss how to use periodization in training. There is no use in a bunch of training workouts if do not know what to do with them. I was expecting a little bit more.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Morten

    Wether you are a cyclist or a runner using a powermeter, you will find this book very useful. It is a really great book with many specific concepts relating to training with power. Especially the presented "power duration curve model (PDC)" is something all serious power athletes should utilise. It is such a great tool when assessing racing and training using power. Wether you are a cyclist or a runner using a powermeter, you will find this book very useful. It is a really great book with many specific concepts relating to training with power. Especially the presented "power duration curve model (PDC)" is something all serious power athletes should utilise. It is such a great tool when assessing racing and training using power.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Yazan Abu

    Good in-depth analysis of how to make the best of your power meter. It can a little bit too technical but necessary to understand the nuances of this power meter complexity

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marcos Moya

    Great book

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carpenter Liu

    以FTP为基础进行的功率训练。没办法完全看懂,但有收获。简单点说,功率分7个等级,练哪补哪。

  11. 5 out of 5

    MaryEllen

    very technical but good reference material

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ranranzi

    A good collection in explaining the basic concepts: Normalized Power (NP), Intensity Factory (IF), Training Stress score (TSS), and Functional threshold power (FTP) etc. Something useful concepts that I am not familiar with: Power profile. This is what I've missing for long time. I am curious to test my guess. The method to calculate different time periods (iLevel) to make power duration curve (PDV), which gives more accurate picture than just using discrete data points (5s, 1m, 5m). I don't think A good collection in explaining the basic concepts: Normalized Power (NP), Intensity Factory (IF), Training Stress score (TSS), and Functional threshold power (FTP) etc. Something useful concepts that I am not familiar with: Power profile. This is what I've missing for long time. I am curious to test my guess. The method to calculate different time periods (iLevel) to make power duration curve (PDV), which gives more accurate picture than just using discrete data points (5s, 1m, 5m). I don't think I would go with Power Manager: Acute Training Load (ATL), Chronic Training Load, etc.. I know the TrainerPeak offers such analysis, but the cost is too high. Let alone, the high requirements for data accuracy. Some advanced concepts, e.g., average effective pedal force (AEPF), circumferential pedal velocity (CPV), and Quadrant Analysis, might useful for the cadence analysis. I think the most interesting part of this book is chapter 10. I am interesting in the example of Bob. I will further read this part and also try to use Table 10.1 like Bob.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    This book was so much more than I had anticipated when I first opened it. Hats off the Hunter Allen for all his hard work in the area of Power Meter Data Analysis. This book took me quite some time to finish as there is so much detail about the analysis and interpretation of the data that the power meters provides that it takes some time to get your head around it all and digest it before moving on to the next section. I am glad I did take the extra time to read each section carefully though as This book was so much more than I had anticipated when I first opened it. Hats off the Hunter Allen for all his hard work in the area of Power Meter Data Analysis. This book took me quite some time to finish as there is so much detail about the analysis and interpretation of the data that the power meters provides that it takes some time to get your head around it all and digest it before moving on to the next section. I am glad I did take the extra time to read each section carefully though as it would not give this book justice if you merely skimmed through each section. Hunter Allen breaks down each chapter and goes into the analysis and interpretation in such detail that anyone from an elite athlete to a weekend warrior could benefit and become a better rider. I will probably never use all the information in this book but it will be my number one reference for new training material and training programs as there are endless permutations that are provided. I definitely feel more knowledgeable about the subject of Training and Racing with Power now and will be using this in my own rides and for those that I coach.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Crharnish

    This book is highly overrated. A disappointment for Andy Coggan, and nothing more than a money making and marketing scheme for Hunter Allen's software. Most individuals I talk to who understand physiology and have read this book have similar feelings. It's an over-simplification of the use of power meters for cycling training and VERY one-sided, selling only Hunter Allen's view of training and power analysis. This book, along with Allen's Power certification have done nothing but create an army This book is highly overrated. A disappointment for Andy Coggan, and nothing more than a money making and marketing scheme for Hunter Allen's software. Most individuals I talk to who understand physiology and have read this book have similar feelings. It's an over-simplification of the use of power meters for cycling training and VERY one-sided, selling only Hunter Allen's view of training and power analysis. This book, along with Allen's Power certification have done nothing but create an army of mindless coaches who know nothing of physiology and simply apply cookie cutter approaches to analysis. Further, nothing in the book has been validated by any peer reviewed research study; its all anecdotal. From such a premiere researcher as Coggan, this book is a let down and I don't expect the next edition to be much better...though I'll be happy to read and review it! If you already understand training, save your money on this one.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Miller

    this book is essentially a reference title for biking with a power meter. very useful for me who is just starting to train with power but of course much of it is either too technical or not really relevant to me at this point (especially since my power meter is part of my indoor trainer and i dont know if i'm going to invest in an actual power meter for out on the road) but i guess it's worthwhile to get introduced to some of the concepts and then maybe come back to them later on if i think will this book is essentially a reference title for biking with a power meter. very useful for me who is just starting to train with power but of course much of it is either too technical or not really relevant to me at this point (especially since my power meter is part of my indoor trainer and i dont know if i'm going to invest in an actual power meter for out on the road) but i guess it's worthwhile to get introduced to some of the concepts and then maybe come back to them later on if i think will be helpful.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    If you own a power meter or are considering one, you have to buy it. Only reason I give it 4 instead of 5: a little out of date on the facts (inevitable with technology moving so rapidly); and, more serious criticism, a little to heavy on examples for hypothetical athletes. The part about building a program, for example, walks through a hypothetical athlete and his schedule. Great, but that doesn't give any abstracted rules to allow one to generate myriad other programs. If you own a power meter or are considering one, you have to buy it. Only reason I give it 4 instead of 5: a little out of date on the facts (inevitable with technology moving so rapidly); and, more serious criticism, a little to heavy on examples for hypothetical athletes. The part about building a program, for example, walks through a hypothetical athlete and his schedule. Great, but that doesn't give any abstracted rules to allow one to generate myriad other programs.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Folkert Wierda

    Pretty good explanation about training and racing with power, though not (as the authors admit) a training book. For that you also must read Friel (Cycling Training Bible or Triathlon Training Bible). I would still expect slightly more pace on analysis of power data, detailed examples. But anyhow a good book. Also: you need what they call CyclingPeaks software (what is now WKO+, from TrainingPeaks) in order to get the charts the book describes. I have that, so this is fine for me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bud Winn

    Excellent read on understanding the mystical nuances of training with power. This book goes into full detail on everything - FTP, training zones, etc. Overall, highly recommend for any cyclist/triathlete.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Ford

    Openned my eyes to training with power. A must read for any serious cyclist looking to improve

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Pretty technical. I'm applying it to erg rowing, not cycling. The watts in cycling are enormous, or maybe I'm just a weakling. Pretty technical. I'm applying it to erg rowing, not cycling. The watts in cycling are enormous, or maybe I'm just a weakling.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Good introduction, can't wait to start with my new power meter Good introduction, can't wait to start with my new power meter

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Harvey

    A good introduction to training and racing with power.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    easy read and valuable guide Answered almost all of the questions I had about training with power. The examples and workouts provided are a valuable resource as well

  24. 5 out of 5

    Albert

    The definitive book on training with power. Technical and thorough yet easy to use as reference. As close to a reference manual as you'd want to get without reading scientific papers. The definitive book on training with power. Technical and thorough yet easy to use as reference. As close to a reference manual as you'd want to get without reading scientific papers.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Trey Davis

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paul Nixon

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kuat

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Martz

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nick

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.