website statistics Allergic to the Great Wall, the Forbidden Palace, and Other Tourist Attractions - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Allergic to the Great Wall, the Forbidden Palace, and Other Tourist Attractions

Availability: Ready to download

Here’s the sixth book in the beloved and hilarious Alvin Ho chapter book series, which has been compared to Diary of a Wimpy Kid and is perfect for both beginning and reluctant readers. Alvin, an Asian American second grader who’s afraid of everything, is taking his fears to a whole new level—or should we say, continent. On a trip to introduce brand-new baby Ho to relative Here’s the sixth book in the beloved and hilarious Alvin Ho chapter book series, which has been compared to Diary of a Wimpy Kid and is perfect for both beginning and reluctant readers. Alvin, an Asian American second grader who’s afraid of everything, is taking his fears to a whole new level—or should we say, continent. On a trip to introduce brand-new baby Ho to relatives in China, Alvin’s anxiety is at fever pitch. First there’s the harrowing 16-hour plane ride; then there’s a whole slew of cultural differences to contend with: eating lunch food for breakfast, kung fu lessons, and acupuncture treatment (yikes!). Not to mention the crowds that make it easy for a small boy to get lost. From Lenore Look and New York Times bestselling illustrator LeUyen Pham comes a drop-dead-funny and touching series with a truly unforgettable character. “Shares with Diary of a Wimpy Kid the humor that stems from trying to manipulate the world.” —Newsday   “Alvin’s a winner.” —New York Post


Compare

Here’s the sixth book in the beloved and hilarious Alvin Ho chapter book series, which has been compared to Diary of a Wimpy Kid and is perfect for both beginning and reluctant readers. Alvin, an Asian American second grader who’s afraid of everything, is taking his fears to a whole new level—or should we say, continent. On a trip to introduce brand-new baby Ho to relative Here’s the sixth book in the beloved and hilarious Alvin Ho chapter book series, which has been compared to Diary of a Wimpy Kid and is perfect for both beginning and reluctant readers. Alvin, an Asian American second grader who’s afraid of everything, is taking his fears to a whole new level—or should we say, continent. On a trip to introduce brand-new baby Ho to relatives in China, Alvin’s anxiety is at fever pitch. First there’s the harrowing 16-hour plane ride; then there’s a whole slew of cultural differences to contend with: eating lunch food for breakfast, kung fu lessons, and acupuncture treatment (yikes!). Not to mention the crowds that make it easy for a small boy to get lost. From Lenore Look and New York Times bestselling illustrator LeUyen Pham comes a drop-dead-funny and touching series with a truly unforgettable character. “Shares with Diary of a Wimpy Kid the humor that stems from trying to manipulate the world.” —Newsday   “Alvin’s a winner.” —New York Post

30 review for Allergic to the Great Wall, the Forbidden Palace, and Other Tourist Attractions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Reads Ravenously

    3.5 stars I've been reading a lot more middle grade and children's books for work lately so I figured why not review them? I took the time to read them. Maybe one of my romance heavy followers will pick up a book for the child in their life. Anyways, this was a very funny book. Alvin Ho is a neurotic seven year old who is allergic to everything. He's afraid to take risks and unwilling to try new things. This makes for excellent comedy when his family takes a trip to China, a trip full of new and 3.5 stars I've been reading a lot more middle grade and children's books for work lately so I figured why not review them? I took the time to read them. Maybe one of my romance heavy followers will pick up a book for the child in their life. Anyways, this was a very funny book. Alvin Ho is a neurotic seven year old who is allergic to everything. He's afraid to take risks and unwilling to try new things. This makes for excellent comedy when his family takes a trip to China, a trip full of new and unfamiliar experiences. While this book was funny, as an adult it was all over the place and had no coherent plot. I think reluctant readers would enjoy it because of the antics of the main character. Another bonus, this book made me want to travel to China! Someday hopefully!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Venus

    Review originally posted on Children's Atheneum Alvin Ho is traveling with his family to China. However, when you are the kind of kid who fears everything, China can seem like a very scary place. First there is the 16-hour plane ride, then there's things like eating lunch food for breakfast, kung-fu lessons, acupuncture, the Great Wall of China, and a lost passport. Apparently, this is the sixth book in the Alvin Ho series and I simply cannot believe I have not read them before. Alvin is a little Review originally posted on Children's Atheneum Alvin Ho is traveling with his family to China. However, when you are the kind of kid who fears everything, China can seem like a very scary place. First there is the 16-hour plane ride, then there's things like eating lunch food for breakfast, kung-fu lessons, acupuncture, the Great Wall of China, and a lost passport. Apparently, this is the sixth book in the Alvin Ho series and I simply cannot believe I have not read them before. Alvin is a little boy with a lot of fears. He is terrified of almost everything, and although sometimes I wished the parents would be a little more understanding of their son who clearly has some OCD tendencies and needs a lot of reassuring, I found he and his family to be rather cute and endearing. Alvin is not afraid to voice his fears and his family is very patient with him. This is one of those books that I was a little curious about the intended target audience. Alvin is seven-years-old. The obvious reading level is definitely above second grade, which means that the children reading this story are already older than the main character. When I worked at a bookstore, we called these kind of books "bridger books". Books that were right in-between chapter books and middle grade. Easier than Harry Potter and harder than Junie B. Jones. There are a couple of series like this: Clementine, Ramona Quimby, Judy Moody. The key to defining these books really is narrative voice and Alvin nestles itself firmly into the middle-grade categorization despite the youth of the main protagonist. Seeing as there are plenty of illustrations, I would say that this one would be good to read aloud to that second grader who might not be ready to read the series on their own. And of course we must talk about the fact that this is a story about an Asian American boy and his family. Not to mention his multi-ethnic cousins who are part white and part Asian. This is a rarity among rarities in the middle-grade world, not to mention literature in general. I don't want to make it sound like they don't exist, but they are so few and far between. For parents, teachers, and librarians who are looking for more books featuring Asian-Americans kids then this it it. Ethnicity aside, I think many kids will enjoy this book, although I do recommend starting with book one. I am pretty sure it makes more sense that way.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    It's Christmas vacation and Alvin Ho, 7 year old Chinese American second grader, is back for another adventure and this time he's leaving his home in Concord, MA and traveling half way around the world to visit family in Beijing, China. For most kids, a trip to China would be an exciting, fun adventure, but most kids aren't Alvin. For Alvin, it means packing your PDK (Personal Disaster Kit), and climbing into a tin can to fly half way around the world, accompanied by his dad, his mom, older brot It's Christmas vacation and Alvin Ho, 7 year old Chinese American second grader, is back for another adventure and this time he's leaving his home in Concord, MA and traveling half way around the world to visit family in Beijing, China. For most kids, a trip to China would be an exciting, fun adventure, but most kids aren't Alvin. For Alvin, it means packing your PDK (Personal Disaster Kit), and climbing into a tin can to fly half way around the world, accompanied by his dad, his mom, older brother Calvin, younger sister Anibelly and baby sister Claire, and oh, yes, all his allergies. You see, Alvin is allergic to all kinds of scary things, and on a trip to a foreign country, he will be able to add all kinds if fears like flying, heights, and elevators to his repertoire of allergies. Once in China, Alvin does manage to visit the Great Wall, lose his father's passport (NOT something you want to have happen in China), go through the Forbidden Palace and, my personal favorite, end up in a Chinese hospital. But anyone familiar with Alvin's previous adventures in fear will remember he is allergic to girls (#1: Alvin Ho is Allergic to Girls School and Other Scary Things), so when his cousin Katie shows him the Christmas tree she decorated with angels bearing the wishes of girls living in an orphanage, Alvin thinks it is a swell idea until the angel he picks says Friend on it. How do you give a friend? And to a girl, no less? It is a conundrum, but Alvin works out with some surprising results. Although Alvin's obsessive nature sometimes got on my nerves, I think the real benefit of the Alvin Ho books is that they address the many fears that kids often have, and may even provide a kind of relief for the reader when they realize they are not alone. I also laughed my way though most of Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, The Forbidden Palace, and Other Tourist Attractions, partly because so much of what happens is so spot on (right down to Calvin's I Climbed the Great Wall t-shirt, the same t-shirt my Kiddo came home wearing from her first trip to China). I've always like Lenore Look's books because he manages to get so much information into the story that you don't even realize you just learned something new about China and Chinese culture. For example, I didn't know that Chinese buildings don't have a 4th, 14th and 24th floor because 4 is an unlucky number in China and they don't have a 13th floor because that is an unlucky number in Western countries. And I didn't know that the purpose of acupuncture is to more your stuck Chi (Qi) or energy to help you feel better. These are just part of Alvin's story and are worked into it so seamlessly. I chose Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, The Forbidden Palace, and Other Tourist Attractions for my first book in the A More Diverse Universe Reading Challenge because so often children's books written by people of color are overlooked and there are so many more that there used to be and so many are wonderful. This review was originally posted at Randomly Reading

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Roberts

    Excellent addition to this hilarious series. In this volume, the Chinese-American family travels to China. The MC's paranoia's, fears, and misunderstandings make for a comedy of errors as he visits the tourist highlights of China. Full of fun facts (and some funny misinformation) young readers will laugh along with the character's shortcomings and smile as he finally learns to overcome his fears and do the right thing (at least once.) Parents will love the kid-friendly humor, and nod along with Excellent addition to this hilarious series. In this volume, the Chinese-American family travels to China. The MC's paranoia's, fears, and misunderstandings make for a comedy of errors as he visits the tourist highlights of China. Full of fun facts (and some funny misinformation) young readers will laugh along with the character's shortcomings and smile as he finally learns to overcome his fears and do the right thing (at least once.) Parents will love the kid-friendly humor, and nod along with the over-the-top trials the boy puts his parents through. Energetic illustrations throughout add to the charm. Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Annina Luck Wildermuth

    Really good and looking forward to reading the whole series now plus the Ruby series. There is great humor but also emotion in this book. I love Alvin's relationship with his father and also that he is a truly empathetic person. Illustrations by LeUyen Pham add so much to this story. Her characters also are empathetic and amusing. Really good and looking forward to reading the whole series now plus the Ruby series. There is great humor but also emotion in this book. I love Alvin's relationship with his father and also that he is a truly empathetic person. Illustrations by LeUyen Pham add so much to this story. Her characters also are empathetic and amusing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aaron.W

    really funny and interesting to see how his imagination works

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cydney Griffin

    Cydney Griffin In the book, Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, The Forbidden Palace and other tourist attractions, Alvin and family are about to go on a awesome adventure. This adventure would take them to China, but Alvin is afraid of China. Actually Alvin is afraid of everything! If he has his handy PDK along his side everything will be fine and he will survive anything that comes in his path. Much preparation and reading was done before this trip to avoid death at all cost. The first proble Cydney Griffin In the book, Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, The Forbidden Palace and other tourist attractions, Alvin and family are about to go on a awesome adventure. This adventure would take them to China, but Alvin is afraid of China. Actually Alvin is afraid of everything! If he has his handy PDK along his side everything will be fine and he will survive anything that comes in his path. Much preparation and reading was done before this trip to avoid death at all cost. The first problems came about in during the 16 hour plane ride to the opposite side of the Earth with the help of Alvin paranoid antics causing plenty of problems. Once the family arrived in China the first stop would be the Great Wall of China. But Alvin had other worried like the crowded street, air pollution in China and walking on a cement grave trail called the Great Wall of China! To see if Alvin and family survive this trip in China read this book! Early Chapter Book Interset Level: K-3 Grade Level:2-3 Bloom's Questions: 1. What examples can be found in the book to support Alvin's paranoia? 2. Distinguish between Katie and Anibelly's (Anibelle) characters? 3. What's your opinion of Alvin's dad and why do you feel that way? What evidence leads you to his conclusion of him? 4.What part of Alvin and family's adventures did you enjoy the most? 5. Invent a new scenario that involve the family being in China. Make Alvin the hero for this scenario, research on tourist attractions in China maybe needed. Citation: Look, L., & Pham, L. (2014). Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, the Forbidden Palace, and other tourist attractions. New York: Random House LLC.

  8. 5 out of 5

    babyhippoface

    This was a tough call for me. I loved Alvin Ho in his first appearance. He was adorable and endearing. In this novel, though, I was impatient with him, wanted him to be more reasonable, and found him annoying for most of the first half of the book. His behavior on the airplane was not acceptable, and his irrational fears caused his family unnecessary difficulties and delays both in the airport and once they reached their destination in China. I wanted his parents to say, “I know you're afraid of This was a tough call for me. I loved Alvin Ho in his first appearance. He was adorable and endearing. In this novel, though, I was impatient with him, wanted him to be more reasonable, and found him annoying for most of the first half of the book. His behavior on the airplane was not acceptable, and his irrational fears caused his family unnecessary difficulties and delays both in the airport and once they reached their destination in China. I wanted his parents to say, “I know you're afraid of elevators, but we're not walking up 32 flights of stairs just because you're afraid. It's time to face that fear.” But they didn't. They let Alvin's fears control their behaviors. I can understand and sympathize that when your child is afraid, you want to keep him or her calm, but I thought this was this a little too extreme. It was only when Alvin came to the Christmas tree with the wishing angels that I began to see him in a more sympathetic light. Finally, he began to show a little compassion for others, and less selfishness. It was good to see that Alvin again, it just took too long to find him. I also found that I enjoyed learning about China through the eyes of Alvin's cousins who taught him in ways he could understand. I liked the glossary as well, but thought it was a little too jam-packed with all the things the author wanted to teach readers about China but did not have room for. Overall, I still love Alvin Ho and will continue to recommend him to kids.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Another adorable addition to Alvin Ho's adventures. In this book Alvin and his family travel to China to take in the sights and visit family. Alvin still finds plenty of things to be scared of and hilarity ensues. Summary: Here's the sixth book in the beloved and hilarious Alvin Ho chapter book series, which has been compared to Diary of a Wimpy Kid and is perfect for both beginning and reluctant readers. Alvin, an Asian American second grader who's afraid of everything, is taking his fears to a Another adorable addition to Alvin Ho's adventures. In this book Alvin and his family travel to China to take in the sights and visit family. Alvin still finds plenty of things to be scared of and hilarity ensues. Summary: Here's the sixth book in the beloved and hilarious Alvin Ho chapter book series, which has been compared to Diary of a Wimpy Kid and is perfect for both beginning and reluctant readers. Alvin, an Asian American second grader who's afraid of everything, is taking his fears to a whole new level-or should we say, continent. On a trip to introduce brand-new baby Ho to relatives in China, Alvin's anxiety is at fever pitch. First there's the harrowing 16-hour plane ride; then there's a whole slew of cultural differences to contend with: eating lunch food for breakfast, kung fu lessons, and acupuncture treatment (yikes!). Not to mention the crowds that make it easy for a small boy to get lost.From Lenore Look and New York Times bestselling illustrator LeUyen Pham comes a drop-dead-funny and touching series with a truly unforgettable character."Shares with Diary of a Wimpy Kid the humor that stems from trying to manipulate the world." -Newsday a "Alvin's a winner." -New York Post

  10. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    I LOVE that this book introduces young readers to China and many aspects of Chinese culture. But, for the first time in this series, I found myself feeling frustrated and annoyed with Alvin. He is his usual scared and sensitive self, but now - on this big international trip - his actions aren't just cute and funny. They have some serious consequences! He inadvertently causes trouble in the airport security line and on the flight, and his antics deprive his family of a meaningful visit at both th I LOVE that this book introduces young readers to China and many aspects of Chinese culture. But, for the first time in this series, I found myself feeling frustrated and annoyed with Alvin. He is his usual scared and sensitive self, but now - on this big international trip - his actions aren't just cute and funny. They have some serious consequences! He inadvertently causes trouble in the airport security line and on the flight, and his antics deprive his family of a meaningful visit at both the Great Wall of China and the Forbidden Palace. As someone who loves to travel, sightsee, and take photos, I just couldn't forgive Alvin as easily and as quickly as his own family did. :P Like all Alvin Ho books, this one includes a fun glossary at the end. I think this book was paced well, and I understand it would have been difficult to include many more points of interest while also maintaining the desired length and flow. Still, the glossary included so many interesting places and things - the terracotta army in Xian, the panda research center in Chengdu, the dinosaur pit in Zhucheng - that it was a disappointment to see those things mentioned in passing, but not explored in more depth.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katie Fitzgerald

    Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, the Forbidden Palace, and Other Tourist Attractions represents a return to the Alvin Ho we all know and love. The previous book’s premise - that Alvin has a sympathetic pregnancy - was so ridiculous, it seemed like the author might have run out of interesting ways to scare her protagonist. While it is still somewhat unfortunate that Alvin continues to be so terrified of so many things and never seems to grow as a person, the predicaments he gets himself into Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, the Forbidden Palace, and Other Tourist Attractions represents a return to the Alvin Ho we all know and love. The previous book’s premise - that Alvin has a sympathetic pregnancy - was so ridiculous, it seemed like the author might have run out of interesting ways to scare her protagonist. While it is still somewhat unfortunate that Alvin continues to be so terrified of so many things and never seems to grow as a person, the predicaments he gets himself into are highly entertaining, especially for boys in the 7-10-year old range. This story also has the perfect ending, which is much more memorable than the endings in any of the other books. It ends on a punchline without spelling out the joke, which shows the author’s respect for her audience’s intelligence. While this sixth book in the series doesn't necessarily add anything new, for fans of Alvin, it will still be a treat. It has as much humor and heart as the first of the series, with the added bonus of a fresh, new setting.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    As a Chinese American I was relieved by Lenore Look's depiction of Alvin Ho. Despite Alvin's phobias, he's relatable as the every-kid. I cringe when other writers write about Chinese Americans as if they are unicorns or otherworldly mystics. This book was light and playful. My biggest relief was that it avoided stereotypes. The main character's list of cute names to call his youngest sibling? Cute and creative! His term of endearment for his baby sister changed every chapter and named some sweet As a Chinese American I was relieved by Lenore Look's depiction of Alvin Ho. Despite Alvin's phobias, he's relatable as the every-kid. I cringe when other writers write about Chinese Americans as if they are unicorns or otherworldly mystics. This book was light and playful. My biggest relief was that it avoided stereotypes. The main character's list of cute names to call his youngest sibling? Cute and creative! His term of endearment for his baby sister changed every chapter and named some sweet sea animal! So glad such a book exists to avoid depicting Chinese Americans as unapproachable with alien responses that no other North American could relate.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Within a couple pages of the front cover, Alvin has already stripped down to his birthday suit in the airport security line and emptied the highly suspicious contents (you know, knives, lighter fluid, etc.) of his PDK onto the x-ray conveyor belt. And the rest of the book continues in typical Alvin fashion, all the way to the high rises and air pollution and ancient history of Beijing to visit his relatives. Alvin is just as lovable across the globe as he is in Concord – but you’ll be thankful yo Within a couple pages of the front cover, Alvin has already stripped down to his birthday suit in the airport security line and emptied the highly suspicious contents (you know, knives, lighter fluid, etc.) of his PDK onto the x-ray conveyor belt. And the rest of the book continues in typical Alvin fashion, all the way to the high rises and air pollution and ancient history of Beijing to visit his relatives. Alvin is just as lovable across the globe as he is in Concord – but you’ll be thankful you don’t have to travel with him.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is the first Alvin Ho book that I've read. I enjoyed it. It's for a younger audience than I expected. I'll be recommending it to students in grades 2-4. There is a lot of humor, and many children will identify with Alvin's worries. You can think of this as Scaredy Squirrel in novel form, with a side of Asian-American experience. I suspect it would make a great read-aloud. All that being said, I found Alvin's antics repetitive and I am not compelled to read any more in the series. This is the first Alvin Ho book that I've read. I enjoyed it. It's for a younger audience than I expected. I'll be recommending it to students in grades 2-4. There is a lot of humor, and many children will identify with Alvin's worries. You can think of this as Scaredy Squirrel in novel form, with a side of Asian-American experience. I suspect it would make a great read-aloud. All that being said, I found Alvin's antics repetitive and I am not compelled to read any more in the series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    The Styling Librarian

    Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, the Forbidden Palace, and Other Tourist Attractions by Lenore Look, illustrated by LeUyen Pham – Realistic Fiction – 3rd grade and up – What a fantastic novel this was! I loved every bit from traveling with Alvin on an airplane to going through security checks to walking up stairs versus riding an elevator to adventuring around incredible places in China… loved every dramatic, hilarious moment.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karen Arendt

    I just love Alvin Ho, and this is his funniest book yet! The family takes a trip to China, but Alvin's fear of most everything causes troubles including losing a very important passport! I chuckled each time Alvin had a new fish name for his new baby sister, Claire, too. A great read aloud for grades 1-3. I just love Alvin Ho, and this is his funniest book yet! The family takes a trip to China, but Alvin's fear of most everything causes troubles including losing a very important passport! I chuckled each time Alvin had a new fish name for his new baby sister, Claire, too. A great read aloud for grades 1-3.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Read Ribbet

    Alvin Ho is back and this time his family is visiting China. The travel and new surroundings set up many reasons to raise his anxieties. The book is loaded with information about the Chinese tourist attractions as Alvin , his family and relatives spend time together abroad. Alvin Ho continues to be a favorite Acceptable and Accessible text series.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Delightfully silly. A fun story, told in a unique, quirky voice. Some scenes were more than a little over the top which was not really necessary and I would have preferred that the story stay a little more grounded. But on the whole I liked it and will probably read more Alvin (as this turns out to be the 6th in the series.)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tanja

    Loved, loved, loved it! So much fun to read! I was laughing out loud from the very first chapter. The books in this series have gotten better and better and this is most probably my favourite (and I was so sad to find out that it is also the last in the series). Alvin is such a great kid. I loved getting to know him a bit more with each new book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    Another enjoyable read about the ever-anxious Alvin Ho and his adventures with his Chinese-American family. This entry takes the family to China to visit some relatives. Alvin finds plenty to worry about on the plane and on the trip itself. His whirlwind explanation of Chinese history and culture may be just enough for the reader to investigate more on their own.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ann Schwarz

    Another hilarious Alvin Ho adventure. This time with Alvin trying to be a tourist while visiting family in China. I laughed out loud several times as he faces pit toilets, crowds, and dragons that come to life in his imagination.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Moreland

    Alvin Ho is hysterical. This book didn't quite live up to the standards of the first few. It felt like Look was trying to hard to be similar to stories like Diary of a Wimpy Kid. But it was enjoyable nonetheless. Alvin Ho is hysterical. This book didn't quite live up to the standards of the first few. It felt like Look was trying to hard to be similar to stories like Diary of a Wimpy Kid. But it was enjoyable nonetheless.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    “You don’t need words to be a friend,” my mom said. “You just need to be there.” Finally I got a good book to read! Alvin is a funny boy and he's alergic to a lot of things. He's easy to like and kind too. “You don’t need words to be a friend,” my mom said. “You just need to be there.” Finally I got a good book to read! Alvin is a funny boy and he's alergic to a lot of things. He's easy to like and kind too.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    This one might be my favorite. Learning about Chinese culture through the eyes of a young Chinese American boy (3rd generation) whose family takes a trip to China to visit family comes across as so very authentic. I really hope we don't have to wait long for Book #7 in the series. This one might be my favorite. Learning about Chinese culture through the eyes of a young Chinese American boy (3rd generation) whose family takes a trip to China to visit family comes across as so very authentic. I really hope we don't have to wait long for Book #7 in the series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Moni Smith

    This was great! Very funny.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    Adorable! I want to read the rest of the Alvin Ho's books! Too bad I am not 8. I laughed out loud. Adorable! I want to read the rest of the Alvin Ho's books! Too bad I am not 8. I laughed out loud.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    I love Alvin Ho, with all his fears and phobias. I am so glad he survives his trip to China, and discovers ways to cope with the scariness of the other side of the world.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    Oh Alvin. You have such an understanding and patient family. Of course you can be a friend... and so much more.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jen Petro-Roy

    3.5 stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rick Silva

    From the Kiddo's summer reading list. This was in the middle of the series, but the Kiddo and I had a special interest in it because it involves a trip to China, including some places we've visited ourselves. Alvin, who has a long list of fears that at times become paralyzing anxiety, is on a harrowing adventure: A family trip to visit relatives in China. And things begin to go wrong before he's even boarded the plane. Eventually, Alvin finds friendship, and a real cultural experience away from th From the Kiddo's summer reading list. This was in the middle of the series, but the Kiddo and I had a special interest in it because it involves a trip to China, including some places we've visited ourselves. Alvin, who has a long list of fears that at times become paralyzing anxiety, is on a harrowing adventure: A family trip to visit relatives in China. And things begin to go wrong before he's even boarded the plane. Eventually, Alvin finds friendship, and a real cultural experience away from the big, crowded tourist sites of Beijing, and he even works a bit of a Christmas miracle. In places, this felt uncomfortable, as it seemed to be setting up the reader to laugh at Alvin's genuine serious anxiety. In other moments, it really was laugh-aloud funny without feeling mean-spirited at all. The last couple of chapters were the best, as Alvin sets some things right with his father, and overcomes some of his fears when he needs to the most. The supporting characters were quite good, and the book includes a decent amount of facts about Chinese history and culture. I enjoyed the interactions between the various family members, as well as with some of the people they meet in Beijing. This was an instant hit with the Kiddo who laughed out loud through much of it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...