website statistics The Dog Who Came to Stay: A Memoir - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

The Dog Who Came to Stay: A Memoir

Availability: Ready to download

The rib-thin, black-and-white rabbit hound turned up at Hal Borland's Connecticut farm one Christmas night in the middle of a nasty winter storm. Pat, as the dog came to be known, and his raffish travelling companion, a young pup, "were even more unwelcome than the weather," but after a few preliminaries both settled in as members of the Borland household. The pup eventual The rib-thin, black-and-white rabbit hound turned up at Hal Borland's Connecticut farm one Christmas night in the middle of a nasty winter storm. Pat, as the dog came to be known, and his raffish travelling companion, a young pup, "were even more unwelcome than the weather," but after a few preliminaries both settled in as members of the Borland household. The pup eventually found his permanent home elsewhere, but Pat became Hal Borland's true companion - and a local legend, the terror of woodchucks for miles around. With his keen sensitivity to the natural world, Borland here recounts, with deep affection and wonder, how a man and his dog can form a magical and unforgettable partnership. First published in 1961, THE DOG WHO CAME TO STAY "will appeal to many sportsmen and to all people who have ever been closely attached to a dog." (The New York Times Book Review)


Compare

The rib-thin, black-and-white rabbit hound turned up at Hal Borland's Connecticut farm one Christmas night in the middle of a nasty winter storm. Pat, as the dog came to be known, and his raffish travelling companion, a young pup, "were even more unwelcome than the weather," but after a few preliminaries both settled in as members of the Borland household. The pup eventual The rib-thin, black-and-white rabbit hound turned up at Hal Borland's Connecticut farm one Christmas night in the middle of a nasty winter storm. Pat, as the dog came to be known, and his raffish travelling companion, a young pup, "were even more unwelcome than the weather," but after a few preliminaries both settled in as members of the Borland household. The pup eventually found his permanent home elsewhere, but Pat became Hal Borland's true companion - and a local legend, the terror of woodchucks for miles around. With his keen sensitivity to the natural world, Borland here recounts, with deep affection and wonder, how a man and his dog can form a magical and unforgettable partnership. First published in 1961, THE DOG WHO CAME TO STAY "will appeal to many sportsmen and to all people who have ever been closely attached to a dog." (The New York Times Book Review)

30 review for The Dog Who Came to Stay: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessaka

    One of my animal lover friends assured me that the dog in this story doesn’t die, otherwise I would not have read it, and if I had not read it, I would have missed out on a good dog story. And yet, it is a hard book to review as there isn’t much to say, and that is also obvious by all the short reviews on this book. So, what is so special about this book? I don’t know. Let’s see if we can find out somehow: It is set in the country on a farm, or at least I believe it is a farm, only I don’t think t One of my animal lover friends assured me that the dog in this story doesn’t die, otherwise I would not have read it, and if I had not read it, I would have missed out on a good dog story. And yet, it is a hard book to review as there isn’t much to say, and that is also obvious by all the short reviews on this book. So, what is so special about this book? I don’t know. Let’s see if we can find out somehow: It is set in the country on a farm, or at least I believe it is a farm, only I don’t think the ownners produce anything for market. Next, enters two dogs, and I asked myself, why doesn’t this book say, The Dogs Who Came to Stay? Well, because only one stayed. Pat and Mike showed up on their porch one day and wouldn’t leave. Isn’t that just like a dog? I bet they fed them. Well, they kept them both until a neighbor told them that the dogs were chasing deer and chasing deer in the area of the country where they live, was illegal. The dogs could be putdown. It was decided that Pat didn’t chase the deer; it was Mike. Mike found a home with a great family who had children. No tears here. Well, Pat loved to chase groundhogs, and so they had a large cemetery for groundhogs. Now this was rather sad. As we see the owner of Pat taking the groundhogs away from Pat and burying them, and then later on, Pat began burying them in the same area, but not before he had dug one up and rolled in it. Pat had a lot of baths in this book. He also had a lot of visits to the vet to be patched up from his chasig the wrong kind of animal. |Well, we feed our groundhogs and have learned if you plant a garden for them, they will almost leave your garden alone. After all, there is very little for critters to eat when we have destroyed their food source, whatever that is. I know that they love clover, but my husband always mows it down, so there are no flowers for them to eat. They love cat food, so you can add cat food to their meals. Still, they are pigs, I know, and if you don’t give them enough food and put a fence around your own garden, well, forget it. They will also burrow under your fence. And then every night Pat asks to go outside to sleep in his own shed. What? Whoever heard of putting a dog out at night? They are supposed to sleep on your bed or beside your bed. I bet if his owner had children, one of them would have insisted that Pat sleep with him or her, and if his or her parents didn’t allow it, one of the kids would have stepped outside to get Pat and sneaked him into the house. I know this to be true. So, what is so special about Pat? I don’t know. He is just a dog that they loved, and it made for a very good story. And while he grew old by the end of the book, you knew that he had a few more years to live, so you didn’t cry yourself to sleep when you finished the book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Judy Churchill

    This beautifully crafted prose transported me to the farm in New England where Pat, the hound, wandered in one day. I accompanied Pat and his “person”, he has no master, as they routed the rabbits and woodchucks who decimated their garden, I agonized as Pat protected his farm from poachers and caught a bullet in the chest, and Pat brooked no trespassing dogs. His explorations landed him in an animal trap. His adventures were shared in a flowing style that was mesmerizing and beautiful. Do no mis This beautifully crafted prose transported me to the farm in New England where Pat, the hound, wandered in one day. I accompanied Pat and his “person”, he has no master, as they routed the rabbits and woodchucks who decimated their garden, I agonized as Pat protected his farm from poachers and caught a bullet in the chest, and Pat brooked no trespassing dogs. His explorations landed him in an animal trap. His adventures were shared in a flowing style that was mesmerizing and beautiful. Do no miss this literary treasure.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ed Egbert

    Pleasant reading Good book about man's best and most dependable friend. Well worth the time, made me appreciate my friend that I just lost. E Pleasant reading Good book about man's best and most dependable friend. Well worth the time, made me appreciate my friend that I just lost. E

  4. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Loved this book. It was very easy to read and enjoyable. The dog had quite a life and it was a delight to share his adventures.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    This is not great literature or great memoir, but it is a moderately enjoyable account of a suburban writer's relocation to rural Connecticut and his acclimation to its landscape, wildlife, and human inhabitants. Since the author is a writer, I was surprised at the number of punctuation errors; commas are either missing or misplaced. It has more adjectives piled one upon another than the most florid of Lucy Maud Montgomery's prose, and that's saying something. However, you will love the dog; Pat This is not great literature or great memoir, but it is a moderately enjoyable account of a suburban writer's relocation to rural Connecticut and his acclimation to its landscape, wildlife, and human inhabitants. Since the author is a writer, I was surprised at the number of punctuation errors; commas are either missing or misplaced. It has more adjectives piled one upon another than the most florid of Lucy Maud Montgomery's prose, and that's saying something. However, you will love the dog; Pat is charming and not overly anthropomorphized.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tonya

    The Dog Who Came to Stay: A Memoir is an enjoyable, pleasantly-written story. I looked forward to sitting down and relaxing with this book and it did not disappointed. I will read more of Hal Borland's books. In particular, I greatly appreciated the love, care, and companionship Hal and his wife showed to the stray dog they adopted without ever devolving into the current "fur family" drivel. The Dog Who Came to Stay: A Memoir is an enjoyable, pleasantly-written story. I looked forward to sitting down and relaxing with this book and it did not disappointed. I will read more of Hal Borland's books. In particular, I greatly appreciated the love, care, and companionship Hal and his wife showed to the stray dog they adopted without ever devolving into the current "fur family" drivel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Love Hal and his wife never wanted a dog but 2 starts showed up on his property and never left. They eventually have Mike away and kept Pat. Pat's adventures are told in this book. Hal's emotions show when he believes Pat is gone and when Pat is injured. This was an enjoyable read. Love Hal and his wife never wanted a dog but 2 starts showed up on his property and never left. They eventually have Mike away and kept Pat. Pat's adventures are told in this book. Hal's emotions show when he believes Pat is gone and when Pat is injured. This was an enjoyable read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cyndy

    This was a delightful story about a dog who wanders up to a couples home in the country and stays. It was enjoyable and funny in so many ways with a dog being just a dog.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mum

    A good dog story. It was interesting to see how much our feelings about pets has evolved. The writing style was very journalistic. I enjoyed this book. It was far superior to “Lily and the Octopus.” I’m now good on books about dogs for a couple of years.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Clyde Pharr

    Memoir? One of the best I can recall reading about a dog. Makes me wonder how the other dog in the story made out (Mike was his name). Delightful read and truly sorry there is no more to be read....

  11. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    I love books about people and their relationship with the animals for whom they care. I won't say this is the most engrossing book I've ever read (I could read it, put it down, and come back to it a few days later) but it drew me in and introduced me to the world of working dogs, dogs who keep groundhogs from tearing up a garden, or a dog who connects with another dog and along with their human counterparts (or sometimes on their own) roam the countryside together - flushing rabbits and barking I love books about people and their relationship with the animals for whom they care. I won't say this is the most engrossing book I've ever read (I could read it, put it down, and come back to it a few days later) but it drew me in and introduced me to the world of working dogs, dogs who keep groundhogs from tearing up a garden, or a dog who connects with another dog and along with their human counterparts (or sometimes on their own) roam the countryside together - flushing rabbits and barking in sheer joy. The relationship the Borland's have with Pat is similar to the one described in "Merle's Door: Lessons from a Freethinking Dog" by Ted Kerasote - unsentimental, respectful and based on love.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jane Thompson

    Good Dog This is a good book and an excellent story. Hal Borland writes about the stray who shows up and stays, turning into his dog..

  13. 4 out of 5

    Holly A. Woodruff

    Okay book about a country dog I didn't have a dog until I was 62 when I adopted a small shelter dog. I love this dog and he is family to me. I had a hard time with the author's attitude towards dogs in general and toward Pat in particular, the dog who came to stay with Hal and his wife at their country home in Connecticut. Maybe it's the difference in era since this book was written some time ago. I don't know why this book rubbed me the wrong way. I can't imagine a dog really preferring to sleep Okay book about a country dog I didn't have a dog until I was 62 when I adopted a small shelter dog. I love this dog and he is family to me. I had a hard time with the author's attitude towards dogs in general and toward Pat in particular, the dog who came to stay with Hal and his wife at their country home in Connecticut. Maybe it's the difference in era since this book was written some time ago. I don't know why this book rubbed me the wrong way. I can't imagine a dog really preferring to sleep in an unheated shed in the middle of winter rather than a warm house, but my dog sleeps in my bed under the covers with me. This is a series of anecdotes about life with Pat the dog. The passage of time is not easy to figure out. I never felt Pat was secure in his life or his home, despite HaI's warming up to the dog eventually. I don't regret reading this book but if you love your dog like family and you didn't grow up or currently live in the country where animals are for work, you may want to skip this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    A Dog Who Owned a Man I spent a lot of my adult years in Connecticut and that influenced my decision to read this memoir. It was a good decision. The book is timeless in the sense that the love of a good dog is similar from generation to generation, since humans and dog first accompanied one another, I suspect. Yet it also describes an earlier time in the mid-twentieth century. I thoroughly enjoyed it and recommend it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Because I own a dog, I have a weakness for a good dog story. This was a great story about a dog who comes and stays. The descriptions of his antics and behaviors are spot on for how some dogs are and they made me smile. There were a few tears for me too in this memoir. The author is very good at descriptions of the area where he lives, giving me a true sense of the colors, smells and beauty all around them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alice Megna

    I really enjoyed getting to know both the owner and his dog by reading this book. It's a story about a dog who showed up as a stray one Christmas eve, and adopted the author and his wife. Lots of stories of man and dog hunting, living, and sharing their lives. Spoiler alert: I especially appreciated that, unlike most dog stories, this didn't end in the tear-jerking death of the dog. Great book. I really enjoyed getting to know both the owner and his dog by reading this book. It's a story about a dog who showed up as a stray one Christmas eve, and adopted the author and his wife. Lots of stories of man and dog hunting, living, and sharing their lives. Spoiler alert: I especially appreciated that, unlike most dog stories, this didn't end in the tear-jerking death of the dog. Great book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    This is a wonderful dog book, a fast enjoyable read, compelling, concise, and informative, suitable for all ages. I didn't want it to end. Hal Borland was a talented journalist and nature writer born in 1900. This is the second of his books that I read, and I had to buy both as they are unfortunately not available in my library. This is a wonderful dog book, a fast enjoyable read, compelling, concise, and informative, suitable for all ages. I didn't want it to end. Hal Borland was a talented journalist and nature writer born in 1900. This is the second of his books that I read, and I had to buy both as they are unfortunately not available in my library.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Byer

    Growing up we had a dog like Pat that "owned" our area and chose to love and protect our family. This book brought back many happy memories. The author's style is quiet and his writing is rich with images of nature. This book compares, in my estimation, to the animal books of James Herriot. I recommend it for anyone that enjoys a good dog story. Growing up we had a dog like Pat that "owned" our area and chose to love and protect our family. This book brought back many happy memories. The author's style is quiet and his writing is rich with images of nature. This book compares, in my estimation, to the animal books of James Herriot. I recommend it for anyone that enjoys a good dog story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Judith Hendricks

    Great Read! I enjoyed every page of this book. Anyone who is a dog lover would enjoy reading this about the adventures, and misadventures of Pat. He is a well mannered dog with a lot of spirit and joy. He found his family and moved in with them even though the weren't looking for a pet. The love grew between dog and humans, and their lives together were rewarding. Great Read! I enjoyed every page of this book. Anyone who is a dog lover would enjoy reading this about the adventures, and misadventures of Pat. He is a well mannered dog with a lot of spirit and joy. He found his family and moved in with them even though the weren't looking for a pet. The love grew between dog and humans, and their lives together were rewarding.

  20. 4 out of 5

    James Morgan

    Old attitudes good story This book was written in 1961. Attitudes about dogs were quite different back then in the farming community that Hal Borland lived in. Dogs then were disciplined with rolled newspaper. Having said Pat chose the Borland's and this book is a good story about an older time and place and the relationship between man and dog. Old attitudes good story This book was written in 1961. Attitudes about dogs were quite different back then in the farming community that Hal Borland lived in. Dogs then were disciplined with rolled newspaper. Having said Pat chose the Borland's and this book is a good story about an older time and place and the relationship between man and dog.

  21. 4 out of 5

    saundra freauff

    If only someone had cared...... Wish someone could have or would have had sympathy for the "bitch" because, even though she wasnt a purebred, she had a story of her own that also was important. just felt sorry for her and felt she deserved more than death. otherwise, a great book. If only someone had cared...... Wish someone could have or would have had sympathy for the "bitch" because, even though she wasnt a purebred, she had a story of her own that also was important. just felt sorry for her and felt she deserved more than death. otherwise, a great book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marla

    Being a dog person... I loved the personality of Pat! What a great read

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marlene Shofner-Daves

    Interesting. Interesting to see what life is like for a country dog. He enjoyed being able to run free, swim& hunt

  24. 4 out of 5

    Beckey

    The version I have is the 1961 scholastic Ed Interesting & enjoyable story :)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    Were you ever owned by a dog? As soon as I read the first two pages, I realized I had read this book sometime earlier in life. I cannot recall when, or how I happened to read it the first time, but it was already in my brain and the awareness of that flooded my mind. I read it again. If you have loved a dog with all your heart, this may be a book for you. But it is not a book for urban dwellers who love the sights and sounds of the city. This is a book of painted word illustrations that elicit d Were you ever owned by a dog? As soon as I read the first two pages, I realized I had read this book sometime earlier in life. I cannot recall when, or how I happened to read it the first time, but it was already in my brain and the awareness of that flooded my mind. I read it again. If you have loved a dog with all your heart, this may be a book for you. But it is not a book for urban dwellers who love the sights and sounds of the city. This is a book of painted word illustrations that elicit deep memories of the smells, the sounds, and the quiet pace of rural life on the edge of wilderness. This is a story of how a dog chose his people, and how he came to change their lives, as his life was joined to theirs. Borland writes of the rural setting as if it were another character in the story. His descriptions can only be created from the mind of someone who is deeply connected to the land, the seasons, and the natural world. His words will only be fully tasted by those who have had a similar connection to the land and the grand celebration of all of nature’s serial pageants. If hunting abhors you, find another book. Hunting is an accepted part of life here. It is not a grisly reason to glorify killing, but a dog’s passion of purpose and his way of communicating with the man he owns and is devoted to.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    Published in 1961, this is another snippet of Hal Borland's life of how a stray dog chose to own him. The last book, "High, Wide and Lonesome: Growing Up On the Colorado Frontier", set in 1910 in the wild Colorado frontier portrayed five years of his life from age 10 to 15. In this story, he is now married to Barbara, both freelance writers, looking to live a more carefree life out in the country. They are quite aged, having just purchased a 100 acre farm in the upper part of the Housatonic Vall Published in 1961, this is another snippet of Hal Borland's life of how a stray dog chose to own him. The last book, "High, Wide and Lonesome: Growing Up On the Colorado Frontier", set in 1910 in the wild Colorado frontier portrayed five years of his life from age 10 to 15. In this story, he is now married to Barbara, both freelance writers, looking to live a more carefree life out in the country. They are quite aged, having just purchased a 100 acre farm in the upper part of the Housatonic Valley called Weatogue, in the fartherest upper northwest corner of Connecticut, when two stray male dogs appeared in the middle of the night and also called it home. Pat, part foxhound, is the prominent dog to become a part of their lives. The other was too young and restless, so they eventually ended up giving him away to a family with a young boy who was down because he had just lost his dog. If you have a dog or dogs that are part of your family, you will completely love and understand just what he is talking about in this book, if not, then you might find it pretty boring. I could relate to just about every subject he touched on while learning Pat's, sometimes insufferable, behavior and dog language (barks). They had a lot of adventures together living in the valley with a river running through it and pasture on one side and mountains on the other. Dogs do have a way of stealing your heart and, eventually, breaking your heart. I have only owned strayed dogs, and they have all had their very own distinct personalities. We've never owned more than two dogs at a time since we have a tendancy to let them come indoors and live a life with us. That's all we can handle, and they show up just in time. As one dog dies, another dog seems to choose us to own. Love that!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Easily ranks four stars and now among my favorites to be read again and again. You may be appalled by some of the things the author reveals in this memoir... feeding chocolate and onions to a dog, or whomping him on the nose with a newspaper for example. But remember: this was published in 1961, long before it became common knowledge these actions are detrimental to your pup's well-being. And so the book reflects a different mindset than what most dog lovers share today; attitudes that were comm Easily ranks four stars and now among my favorites to be read again and again. You may be appalled by some of the things the author reveals in this memoir... feeding chocolate and onions to a dog, or whomping him on the nose with a newspaper for example. But remember: this was published in 1961, long before it became common knowledge these actions are detrimental to your pup's well-being. And so the book reflects a different mindset than what most dog lovers share today; attitudes that were common at the time because few people knew any better. In spite of that, the obvious love and tenderness Borland, his wife and friends feel for their animals is a joy to read. The stories, adventures, and most of all the canine personalities and character quirks Borland paints are endearing, captivating and truly wonderful. And they're painted in a down-to-earth, no nonsense style that shines brilliantly. It's a remarkable book and one I highly recommend. Best of all, even though you will find your eyes leaking at times, our hero does not die at the end.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    I'm not sure how many dog books I've read, but it might be time for a Goodreads shelf of their own. Whenever I need a good book to relax with, a dog book is the sure winner. I wasn't sure this one, a memoir (as most of them are), was going to be a good bet at first, but I loved it before the halfway point. In the beginning, the narrator had a much too logical and "follow the rules or else" perspective, rather than an emotional, friendly one, and I feared that I would have to give the book a "DNF I'm not sure how many dog books I've read, but it might be time for a Goodreads shelf of their own. Whenever I need a good book to relax with, a dog book is the sure winner. I wasn't sure this one, a memoir (as most of them are), was going to be a good bet at first, but I loved it before the halfway point. In the beginning, the narrator had a much too logical and "follow the rules or else" perspective, rather than an emotional, friendly one, and I feared that I would have to give the book a "DNF." But soon it shifted, dog and man bonded, and the rest was so good I had to read several parts out loud to my ever-patient and dog-loving husband. Pat, the star of the show, was a stray beagle/hound mix, and I loved him right from the start. We have a beagle mix, too, and some of the descriptions of Pat's habits and actions fit our Rufus perfectly! And the dog does NOT die in the end. What could be better than that!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    I'm a Dog Person Great story , full of love and respect from both Pat(the dog) and the people HE chose to love. I have 4 Yorkies and a Cock a Poo. All beautiful and loving. They have a good life with myself & husband then my Mom moved in with us. SHE now has 4 Yorkies and a Cock 3Poo as they now love her, guard over her and are worried like crazy when she is in hospital. Dogs are so sensitive and intuitive they realize she is frail and they all seem to take turns being with her. My furbabies rang I'm a Dog Person Great story , full of love and respect from both Pat(the dog) and the people HE chose to love. I have 4 Yorkies and a Cock a Poo. All beautiful and loving. They have a good life with myself & husband then my Mom moved in with us. SHE now has 4 Yorkies and a Cock 3Poo as they now love her, guard over her and are worried like crazy when she is in hospital. Dogs are so sensitive and intuitive they realize she is frail and they all seem to take turns being with her. My furbabies range in age from 7 to 12 years old. 2 arrived as babies 14 weeks old, all others were born here and will never leave. People are Blessed when loved by a dog. The joy and quality of life they can give is unmatched by any other animal. Truly enjoyed this story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    7$MartyQ

    They are like angels among us There is something that you only know if you have ever loved and been loved by a dog. A Dog that loves you would rather sleep outside with you if that's what you had to do on a freezing winter night when he could be comfortable sleeping on a rug in a nice warm house. They ask nothing other than a bowl of food and fresh water every day, in exchange for which they would unselfish and gladly give their life for you if you needed them to do so, Such is the love of a dog They are like angels among us There is something that you only know if you have ever loved and been loved by a dog. A Dog that loves you would rather sleep outside with you if that's what you had to do on a freezing winter night when he could be comfortable sleeping on a rug in a nice warm house. They ask nothing other than a bowl of food and fresh water every day, in exchange for which they would unselfish and gladly give their life for you if you needed them to do so, Such is the love of a dog for its master. And if you're a family, the dog will pick the one he chooses and there's nothing you can do about it, for he has chosen you. I sometimes wonder if we are worthy of such unconditional love...

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.