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The Mediator Pattern

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Some ​people wait an entire lifetime for purpose. Some don't find it at all. Some spend an eternity searching for paradise... for a Utopia. But sometimes purpose and paradise come at a cost. BelisCo-San Jose boasts all ​the latest breakthrough technology: the fax machine, the electric typewriter, the tri-ox system transport vehicle and the newest technological breakthrough Some ​people wait an entire lifetime for purpose. Some don't find it at all. Some spend an eternity searching for paradise... for a Utopia. But sometimes purpose and paradise come at a cost. BelisCo-San Jose boasts all ​the latest breakthrough technology: the fax machine, the electric typewriter, the tri-ox system transport vehicle and the newest technological breakthrough, the porta-fax. With innovations ​galore, BelisCo-San Jose is a modern-day Utopia—perfect​ly designed, complete with adult-only zones, smoking and non-smoking zones, cannabis, cigarettes, food, work, income, and reliable, clean transportation—all provided by BelisCo. But things are not entirely as they seem in San Jose. It is here that jaded, chain-smoking Marcus Metiline's world is turned upside down. ​After taking a mediation job with the ​ubiquitous BelisCo and meeting a peculiar doctor beyond the city's zoned limits, Marcus's world quickly unravels.​ It all starts with flashes of déjà vu and memories that have gone astray. ​As Marcus searches for answers to the increasingly strange events around him, it's not long before he discovers that the fate of the world rests ​in him. He's been told exactly what he needs to do... But is something bigger moving him along?


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Some ​people wait an entire lifetime for purpose. Some don't find it at all. Some spend an eternity searching for paradise... for a Utopia. But sometimes purpose and paradise come at a cost. BelisCo-San Jose boasts all ​the latest breakthrough technology: the fax machine, the electric typewriter, the tri-ox system transport vehicle and the newest technological breakthrough Some ​people wait an entire lifetime for purpose. Some don't find it at all. Some spend an eternity searching for paradise... for a Utopia. But sometimes purpose and paradise come at a cost. BelisCo-San Jose boasts all ​the latest breakthrough technology: the fax machine, the electric typewriter, the tri-ox system transport vehicle and the newest technological breakthrough, the porta-fax. With innovations ​galore, BelisCo-San Jose is a modern-day Utopia—perfect​ly designed, complete with adult-only zones, smoking and non-smoking zones, cannabis, cigarettes, food, work, income, and reliable, clean transportation—all provided by BelisCo. But things are not entirely as they seem in San Jose. It is here that jaded, chain-smoking Marcus Metiline's world is turned upside down. ​After taking a mediation job with the ​ubiquitous BelisCo and meeting a peculiar doctor beyond the city's zoned limits, Marcus's world quickly unravels.​ It all starts with flashes of déjà vu and memories that have gone astray. ​As Marcus searches for answers to the increasingly strange events around him, it's not long before he discovers that the fate of the world rests ​in him. He's been told exactly what he needs to do... But is something bigger moving him along?

41 review for The Mediator Pattern

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I went for this due to its interesting slight twist on the noir genre. I was intrigued at the idea of a PI in an alternate world where fax machines were the status quo instead of PCs. It felt almost like a steampunk. Techpunk? There should be a world for this when the old tech isn't steam-power. In any case, although I found the world very interesting and I enjoyed visiting it, the plot left me dissatisfied. This book is an enjoyable read even when the plot is doing weird things. The sentences fl I went for this due to its interesting slight twist on the noir genre. I was intrigued at the idea of a PI in an alternate world where fax machines were the status quo instead of PCs. It felt almost like a steampunk. Techpunk? There should be a world for this when the old tech isn't steam-power. In any case, although I found the world very interesting and I enjoyed visiting it, the plot left me dissatisfied. This book is an enjoyable read even when the plot is doing weird things. The sentences flow smoothly, and the settings and characters are clearly rendered. I really enjoyed this alternate world. I liked it so much that I was disappointed by how little time we spend in it. Marcus is quickly scooped out and plopped into another world, and I didn't like that one nearly as much or find it as interesting. The first world Marcus inhabits is creative and new. The other worlds are more dull and are things I've seen before. It's difficult to review this book without giving much away, but suffice to say that there is physics in the book, and while I appreciate the fact that science of it is good and well-explained, it also is a physics I've seen in scifi many times before, and I don't think this particular rendering brought anything fresh to the table. There are three really important characters in the book: Marcus, the owner of BelisCo, and a doctor. All three of them are male. This makes the book read a bit like a boys' club, and it bugged me. The book would have instantly been more unique and interesting if, say, Marcus had been a hard-boiled woman PI. When every main character is basically the same (an intelligent white male), it's just dull. So, the non-spoiler reason of why I wasn't into the plot is that I felt it took things just one twist too far, rendering things a bit ridiculous. If you want more explanation, see the spoiler-filled paragraph below. (view spoiler)[ Basically, Marcus finds out that San Jose is some sort of Matrix-like simulation aka not the real world, and he is encouraged to break out of it. When he does, the buildings of San Jose start falling apart and people are mad at him. We discover that the reason for this is that the simulation was being done on a bunch of cancer patients. The science here didn't make much sense to me at the time, but basically they would live longer if they were in the simulation, giving them more of a chance to beat the cancer. Everyone entered the simulation through Marcus, and they had to keep him believing it to keep the experiment going. This whole experiment is highly illegal, and they blow up the building to get rid of the evidence. There are then hints that there are more worlds and simulations than these. First, I found the whole we're in a simulation and this isn't real life thing to be a very been there done that plot. It took us out of the much more interesting simulation world and into a computer simulation that I've seen before. The second twist of it actually being cancer treatment and them needing Marcus to stay in the world just sent the whole thing off into left field for me. Particularly since I found the science of the cancer treatment to be weak compared to the physics earlier. While I appreciate to others it may read more like a cool idea, to me it just took things on a path from super interesting to I've seen this before to wtf was that. It just really didn't work for me. (hide spoiler)] Overall, readers who are intrigued by the world in the summary and who don't mind multiple plot twists and a predominantly male cast will enjoy this read. It is well-written and interesting, but readers expecting to linger in the fax machine world of the plot summary should know that this world is soon left behind. Check out my full review. (Link will be live September 15, 2015). Note: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    An entertaining trip down the rabbit hole. The Mediator Pattern has a fascinating concept of an alternate timeline. Characters aren't overly developed but the pacing more than makes up for it. Some plot elements get a little exhausted and some of the metaphysics get convoluted but hang in there - the ending is worth the wait. A good read worth picking up. An entertaining trip down the rabbit hole. The Mediator Pattern has a fascinating concept of an alternate timeline. Characters aren't overly developed but the pacing more than makes up for it. Some plot elements get a little exhausted and some of the metaphysics get convoluted but hang in there - the ending is worth the wait. A good read worth picking up.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dee

    Great book! A very good read... you'll enjoy it! Great book! A very good read... you'll enjoy it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Spuckler

    “Quantum mechanics has it all wrong. It’s time that is discrete, quantized, not energy. Energy is an infinite continuum, space is entirely relative, and time is not necessarily linear. ” The Mediator Pattern by J.D. Lee is an intricately written novel. Marcus Metiline, the main character, is a patent mediator. He is hired by the Belis Corporation and meets with the elusive Colin Belis. The Belis Corporation, for the most part, runs the country. It has taken over departments piecemeal fashion and “Quantum mechanics has it all wrong. It’s time that is discrete, quantized, not energy. Energy is an infinite continuum, space is entirely relative, and time is not necessarily linear. ” The Mediator Pattern by J.D. Lee is an intricately written novel. Marcus Metiline, the main character, is a patent mediator. He is hired by the Belis Corporation and meets with the elusive Colin Belis. The Belis Corporation, for the most part, runs the country. It has taken over departments piecemeal fashion and has grown into a powerhouse. Colin Belis, who inherited the company, holds multiple doctorates and purchased the city of San Jose. San Jose, where the company headquarters is located, has become Belis’ custom designed playground. Marcus is hired personally by Belis to check on a possible patent infringement. Then the story gets really weird. The story takes place in modern times, and its not the cell phone, laptop, or tablet that is the hot piece of technology, but personal fax machines — desktop and portable. Society is controlled and for Marcus, things begin to get strange. He is a heavy smoker that keeps track of his matches and lives in a smoking section of San Jose. For the reader, there is a feeling of reading a futuristic novel from the 1950s. It is a glimpse into a future that did not evolve. There is a loop that develops early in the story and obsession with counting matches, repeat meetings, days, and a man known as Dr. Avant. Clues seem to be scattered through the story to help the reader understand what might be going on. I had several theories as to what might be going on, but each one fell apart as I read on, and progressed even further into the bizarre. This is one book that is difficult to give a detailed review. The story is woven so closely together that too many details will give the story away. However, the story develops well and will easily hold the readers interest. The writing is well done taking the reader on a twisting road to discovering the secret of the story. Intriguing, fun, and complex. Very well done. Joseph Spuckler Book Review Joseph gives The Mediator Pattern 4 1/2 Stars http://www.authoralliance.net/readers...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mark Lein

    I gave this novel 4 out of 5 stars on Amazon and 3.5 on Goodreads! Marcus Metiline is a Patent Mediator pulled into a spiraling dispute and sequence of events connected with the man that holds nearly complete power over the region. After receiving a request to meet with this power broker, Colin Belis, Marcus goes through his daily routine on his way to the meeting. Nothing about his experience inside the Belis Co. complex is routine. He is put through mind altering and disturbing processes in rou I gave this novel 4 out of 5 stars on Amazon and 3.5 on Goodreads! Marcus Metiline is a Patent Mediator pulled into a spiraling dispute and sequence of events connected with the man that holds nearly complete power over the region. After receiving a request to meet with this power broker, Colin Belis, Marcus goes through his daily routine on his way to the meeting. Nothing about his experience inside the Belis Co. complex is routine. He is put through mind altering and disturbing processes in route to the meeting and his conversation with Colin is as odd if not worse. He is asked to meet with someone who has placed a patent that conflicts with Belis holdings and once he meets with the man, a Dr. Avant, he is told that all he knows is a fabrication and a lie instituted by Colin and the Belis Co. The story progresses through myriad “retries” if you will, as each characters present, past and future merge in confusing and sometimes intriguing ways. You never truly understand who is good or bad and what the actual mission is that Marcus has undertaken until the end (though it was worth the wait). Without spoiling the end, I can say that it wraps up the confusion well and very nearly to complete satisfaction. The writing was solid though I nearly put it down after the first chapter due to the emphasis on using long descriptions for every little action. I like writing that leaves some gaps for my imagination to fill in and get annoyed when too much is being explained. Most readers will probably not mind and I am not saying there were no well constructed descriptions and it got much more streamlined the further I progressed through the story. The main thing I had against the novel was the complicated and convoluted story line. I never felt invested in one character as it not only switched between them so quickly and abruptly, but also between different characters (with more info or experience based on time and place) within the same people. I am truly glad that I stuck with the novel. The ending of the novel was its saving grace and makes me able to recommend this book to anyone who likes to think through a book and able to wait to find out large amounts of information. I recommend reading the book, as its rather short, in as few sessions as possible to keep track of what is going on. I feel like if the novel had been a short story instead it would have been one of my favorites in the Sci-Fi genre. There was just a little too much confusion throughout to completely enjoy it but I am now planning to invest some time to read J.D. Lee’s short fiction. He has a collection of short stories and flash fiction, The Future Next Door (We turn Back Toward Tomorrow Book 1) on amazon.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate Bystrova

    The Mediator Pattern kicks off with jaded, chain-smoking Marcus Metiline getting out of bed, foggy-minded and beaten up, to carry out a mediation job for BelisCo, a company synonymous with all the latest breakthrough technology in San Jose. Chatting with the usual blonde waitress at Café Diem, Marcus has no idea that the day will lead to the unravelling of his entire world. Back in his apartment, Marcus’s state of the art portable fax machine whirrs and spits out a summons from BelisCo. He fishes The Mediator Pattern kicks off with jaded, chain-smoking Marcus Metiline getting out of bed, foggy-minded and beaten up, to carry out a mediation job for BelisCo, a company synonymous with all the latest breakthrough technology in San Jose. Chatting with the usual blonde waitress at Café Diem, Marcus has no idea that the day will lead to the unravelling of his entire world. Back in his apartment, Marcus’s state of the art portable fax machine whirrs and spits out a summons from BelisCo. He fishes out a matchbook from his pocket and sparks up a cigarette. Seven matches remain. The start of The Mediator Pattern reminded me in tone of the classic sci-fi writers in its phrasing and descriptions, which are very clear cut and have a deliberate artificial quality. In fact, it put me in mind of a computer-rendered environment in the same way that Philip K. Dick’s novels do – the smooth and shiny, faux-futuristic style of the SF Masterworks covers. The similarity becomes more apparent with the first mention of BelisCo, a company that seems to monopolise every market in the world of The Mediator Pattern. Like Dick’s Ubik, the brand is on every product. And the nods to the masters do not stop there – but I won’t spell them out for you because, truly, it would be better for you to read this book and discover them for yourself. For the full review visit: http://www.thelittlecrocodile.com/the...

  7. 5 out of 5

    T.W. Barton

    There are books that you read where you just put your mind on cruise control and sit back and relax and cruise along. This is not one of those books. If you’ve seen the commercials for Luminosity a site for your brain. Well this is the book form of the site. It will require you to be engaged in the story and pay attention to what is going on. It takes the Matrix to a new level so, if you’re like me and loved those movies you should really enjoy this book. There’s great imagery in here with well-def There are books that you read where you just put your mind on cruise control and sit back and relax and cruise along. This is not one of those books. If you’ve seen the commercials for Luminosity a site for your brain. Well this is the book form of the site. It will require you to be engaged in the story and pay attention to what is going on. It takes the Matrix to a new level so, if you’re like me and loved those movies you should really enjoy this book. There’s great imagery in here with well-defined characters and a twist at the end that I guarantee you will not see coming. If you’re a sci-fi fan then this will be a great addition to your collection.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Martin

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stian Håklev

  10. 4 out of 5

    Winged

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  12. 5 out of 5

    Naveen Patel

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Ford

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matt Kent

  16. 5 out of 5

    DJ

  17. 5 out of 5

    Frithnanth

  18. 5 out of 5

    Garvit Srivastava

  19. 4 out of 5

    J.D. Lee

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brian Stewart

  21. 5 out of 5

    Are

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  23. 5 out of 5

    Abhishar

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vinay Ch

  25. 4 out of 5

    REMEMBER UKRAINE NOW ReadingReindeer

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kartikay Singh

  29. 4 out of 5

    Will

  30. 4 out of 5

    Saptaswa Pal

  31. 5 out of 5

    Waunaknit

  32. 4 out of 5

    Lavendersbluegreen

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kareena30gmail.com

  34. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Cacciatore

  35. 4 out of 5

    Danny Pereyra

  36. 5 out of 5

    Nksoni

  37. 5 out of 5

    Bev

  38. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

  39. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Seaberg

  40. 4 out of 5

    Lady

  41. 5 out of 5

    Juanita

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