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Thinking for a Change: 11 Ways Highly Successful People Approach Life and Work

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At the heart of John C. Maxwell's brilliant and inspiring book is a simple premise: To do well in life, we must first think well. But can we actually learn new mental habits? Thinking for a Change answers that with a resounding "yes" -- and shows how changing your thinking can indeed change your life. Drawing on the words and deeds of many of the world's greatest leaders a At the heart of John C. Maxwell's brilliant and inspiring book is a simple premise: To do well in life, we must first think well. But can we actually learn new mental habits? Thinking for a Change answers that with a resounding "yes" -- and shows how changing your thinking can indeed change your life. Drawing on the words and deeds of many of the world's greatest leaders and using interactive quizzes, this empowering book helps you assess your thinking style, guides you to new ones, and step by step teaches you the secrets of: Big-Picture Thinking -- seeing the world beyond your own needs and how that leads to great ideas. Focused Thinking -- removing mental clutter and distractions to realize your full potential. Creative Thinking -- stepping out of the "box" and making breakthroughs. Shared Thinking -- working with others to compound results. - Reflective Thinking -- looking at the past to gain a better understanding of the future ...and much more. Here America's most trusted and admired motivational teacher examines the very foundation of success and self-transformation. Illuminating and life-changing, Thinking for a Change is a unique primer not on what to think, but how to best use one of your most precious possessions: your mind.


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At the heart of John C. Maxwell's brilliant and inspiring book is a simple premise: To do well in life, we must first think well. But can we actually learn new mental habits? Thinking for a Change answers that with a resounding "yes" -- and shows how changing your thinking can indeed change your life. Drawing on the words and deeds of many of the world's greatest leaders a At the heart of John C. Maxwell's brilliant and inspiring book is a simple premise: To do well in life, we must first think well. But can we actually learn new mental habits? Thinking for a Change answers that with a resounding "yes" -- and shows how changing your thinking can indeed change your life. Drawing on the words and deeds of many of the world's greatest leaders and using interactive quizzes, this empowering book helps you assess your thinking style, guides you to new ones, and step by step teaches you the secrets of: Big-Picture Thinking -- seeing the world beyond your own needs and how that leads to great ideas. Focused Thinking -- removing mental clutter and distractions to realize your full potential. Creative Thinking -- stepping out of the "box" and making breakthroughs. Shared Thinking -- working with others to compound results. - Reflective Thinking -- looking at the past to gain a better understanding of the future ...and much more. Here America's most trusted and admired motivational teacher examines the very foundation of success and self-transformation. Illuminating and life-changing, Thinking for a Change is a unique primer not on what to think, but how to best use one of your most precious possessions: your mind.

30 review for Thinking for a Change: 11 Ways Highly Successful People Approach Life and Work

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sylvie

    Maxwell is a very good motivator. However, I am not sure if he has not written this book for people who want to think like Successful People or for MEN who want to think like Successful People. ONE THING that has really, but really, really bugged me is when he talks about the fact that HE does not have time for the mundane ! Margaret, wonderful, Margaret (that's his wife) takes care of these meaningless things, because Mister's time is WAY too valuable for them !!! Being a woman, I wonder if that Maxwell is a very good motivator. However, I am not sure if he has not written this book for people who want to think like Successful People or for MEN who want to think like Successful People. ONE THING that has really, but really, really bugged me is when he talks about the fact that HE does not have time for the mundane ! Margaret, wonderful, Margaret (that's his wife) takes care of these meaningless things, because Mister's time is WAY too valuable for them !!! Being a woman, I wonder if that makes me doomed for failure ??? Who will be my Margaret ? I know no men who will agree to take this role. He may accept to be my equal but comes on writing the Xmas invitations and pulling together the Easter Menu for the 20 guests we are inviting ... I don't think so ! If by any chance, Mr. Maxwell's squirrels read this ... please let him know that there are now-a-day some successful women in the work force ... and as it has been said before ... Ginger Rogers was only Fred Astaire's partner, but remember that she danced the same dance as he did, only she did it in high heels and backward! OK I said it!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Word Owl

    There was nothing really new about this book. Maxwell tends to use flowery language in order to cover his redundancies. Truth is, the content of this book would be better suited to the length of a blog post rather than a book. There was nothing really new about this book. Maxwell tends to use flowery language in order to cover his redundancies. Truth is, the content of this book would be better suited to the length of a blog post rather than a book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aronkai

    Chapter 1: Understanding the Value of Good thinking Chapter 2: Realize the Impact of Changed Thinking Chapter 3: Master the Process of Intentional Thinking PART II – Eleven thinking skills every successful person needs Skill 1 – Acquire the Wisdom of Big-Picture Thinking Skill 2 – Unleash the Potential of Focused Thinking Skill 3 – Discover the Joy of Creative Thinking Skill 4 – Recognize the importance of realistic thinking Skill 5 – Release the power of strategic thinking Skill 6 – Feel the energy of p Chapter 1: Understanding the Value of Good thinking Chapter 2: Realize the Impact of Changed Thinking Chapter 3: Master the Process of Intentional Thinking PART II – Eleven thinking skills every successful person needs Skill 1 – Acquire the Wisdom of Big-Picture Thinking Skill 2 – Unleash the Potential of Focused Thinking Skill 3 – Discover the Joy of Creative Thinking Skill 4 – Recognize the importance of realistic thinking Skill 5 – Release the power of strategic thinking Skill 6 – Feel the energy of possibility thinking Skill 7 – Embrace the lessons of reflective thinking Skill 8 – Question the acceptance of popular thinking Skill 9 – Encourage the participation of shared thinking Skill 10 – Experience the Satisfaction of Unselfish Thinking Skill 11 – Enjoy the Return of Bottom Line Thinking “A change of thinking can help you move from survival or maintenance to real progress. Ninety-five percent of achieving anything is knowing what you want and paying the price to get it.” (page 14) “One person cannot change another person. For too many years as a motivational teacher, I tried to change people, and it didn’t work. I had good intentions, but I finally realized something: I was responsible to people but not for them. As a leader, I needed to teach the value of changed thinking and how to make those necessary changes; but the people themselves were responsible to make the changes.” (page 27) “Before teaching any lesson, I ask myself three questions: “Do I believe it? Do I live it? Do I believe others should live it?” If I can’t answer yes to all three questions, then I haven’t landed it. (page 46) Give your plans the right amount of thinking time, and you’ll will find that the implementation time decreases and the results get better (page 48). “To start the thinking process, you cannot rely on your feelings. In Failing Forward, I wrote that you can act your way into feeling long before you can feel your way into action. If you wait until you feel like doing something, you will likely never accomplish it.” (page 51) “When you meet with people, it’s good to have an agenda so that you can learn.” (page 64) “French essayist Michel Eyquem de Montaigne wrote, “The value of life lies not in the length of days, but in the use we make of them; a man may live long yet live very little.” (page 65) “Only by putting your daily activities in the context of the big picture will you be able to stay on target. As Alvin Toffler says, “You’ve got to think about ‘big things’ while you’re doing small things, so that all the small things go in the right direction.” (page 67) “One of the most important skills you can develop in human relations is the ability to see things from the other person’s point of view.” (page 68) “In preparation for the day, I focus on that main event and ask myself, In order to make the main event a good event, what must I know, what must I do, what must I see, and what must I eliminate? (page 69) “Big-picture thinkers are comfortable with ambiguity.” (page 70) “Management consultant Patrick M. Lencioni touched on this idea in The Five Temptations of a CEO. He warned that CEOs should not try to pursue harmony. Instead, they should embrace healthy, productive conflict. (page 70) “Varied experiences-both positive and negative-help you see the big picture. The greater the variety of experienced and success, the more potential to learn you have. If you desire to be a big-picture thinker, then get out there and try a lot of things, take a lot of chances, and take time to learn after every victory or defeat.” (page 71) “Talk to people who know and care about you, who know their field, and who bring experience deeper and broader than your own.” (page 72) “There are many ways to determine priorities. If you know yourself well, begin by focusing ton your strength, the things that make best use of your skills and God-given talents. You might also focus on what brings the highest return and reward. Do what you enjoy most and do best. You could use the 80/20 rule. Give 80 percent of your effort to the top 20 percent (more important) activities. Another way is to focus on exceptional opportunities that promise a huge return. It comes down to this: give your attention to the areas that bear fruit. “In an article called “Good to Great,” author Jim Collins remarked, “The real path to greatness, it turns out, requires simplicity and diligence. It requires clarity, not instant illumination. It demands each of us to focus on what is vital – and to eliminate all of the extraneous distractions.” (page 86) “Don’t do easy things first or hard things first or urgent things first. Do first things first – the activities that give you the highest return. In that way, you keep the distractions to a minimum. (page 87) “My advice to you is to place value on and give attention to both (think and being accessible to people). If you naturally withdraw, then make sure to get out among people more often. If you’re always on the go and rarely withdraw for thinking time, then remove yourself periodically so that you can unleash the potential of focused thinking. And wherever you are… be there!” (page 87) “Switching form task to task (multitasking) can cost you up to 40 percent efficiency. According to researchers, “If you’re trying to accomplish many things at the same time, you’ll get more done by focusing on one task at a time, not by switching constantly from one task to another.” (page 87) “Don’t allow yourself to look at e-mail until after 10 A.M. Instead, focus your energies on your number one priority. Put non-productive time wasters on hold so that you can create thinking time for yourself.” (page 88). “First, I’ve chosen a strong inner circle of people… Second, I ask certain friends to catch me up on what’s happening in the lives of other friends.” (page 90) “I’ve not read on novel since I graduated from college. Instead, I’ve chosen to dedicate my reading time no non-fiction because I believe those works spur the kind of growth I desire both personally and professionally.” (page 91) “For example, every week I hand off projects that I think would be fun to do myself. I practice the 10-80-10 principle with the people to whom I’m delegating a task.” (page 91) Vision, parameters, resources, encouragement – delegating (80 %) – Putting the cherry on the top. (10 %) “Ninety-nine percent of everything in life I don’t need to know about.” “Being willing to give up some of the things you love in order to focus on what has the greatest impact isn’t an easy lesson to learn.” (page 92) If I don’t have the innate ability to come up with creative thought myself, I thought, then I’ll mine the creative thoughts of others. (page 98) “Charles Frankel asserts that “anxiety is the essential condition of intellectual and artistic creation.” Creativity requires a willingness to look stupid. (page 105) Creative thinking is hard work but creative thinking compounds given enough time and focus. (page 106). “Creativity is intelligence having fun.” (page 107) Creativity is having options. (page 108, quote form Ernie Zelinski) “Or as Edward De Bono observed in New Think, “You cannot dig a hole in a different place by digging the same hole deeper.” Don’t just work harder at the same old thing. Make a change.” (page 111) “Creativity comes from trust. Trust your instincts. And never hope more than you work.” (Rita Mae Brown, page 113) “The best way to make a living with your imagination is to develop innovative applications, not imagine completely new concepts.”(Sam Weston, 114) Often I take an idea that someone else gives me and raise it to a higher level. (page 114) Reality is the difference between what we wish and what is. (page 122) “Your goal isn’t to be negative or expect the worst, just to be ready for it in case it happens. That way, you give yourself the best chance for a positive result – no matter what. (page 132) “At the beginning of every month, I spend half a day working on my calendar for the next forty days.” (page 141) The best way to create a road to the complex is to build on the fundamentals. (page 151) “If you embrace possibility thinking, your dreams will go from molehill to mountain size, and because you believe in possibilities, you put yourself in position to achieve them. If your thinking runs towards pessimism, let me ask you a question: how many highly successful people do you know who are continually negative? (page 164) “One of the main differences between a good speech and a great one is customization.” (page 180) Mark Twain said, “We should be careful to get out of an experience all the wisdom that is in it – not like the cat that sits down on a hot stove lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove lid again – and that is well; but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore.” Writing down the good thoughts that come out of your reflective thinking has value, but nothing helps you to grow like putting your thoughts into action. To do that, you must be intentional. (pages 186-187) “The greatest enemy to tomorrow’s success is sometimes today’s success.” (page 201) “Instead of trying to be great, be part of something greater than yourself." (page 230

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    This was more motivational than actionable. It's full of good reminders, but I didn't create any to-dos (as I usually do for actionable non-fiction). By the end of the book, I was asking myself, "Am I living the life I've been called to?" To be fair, I do a lot of reading and listening about mindset. In addition, I was in a community leadership development program last year, went through a "boot camp" for web agency owners earlier this year, and am currently in a mastermind for web agency owners. This was more motivational than actionable. It's full of good reminders, but I didn't create any to-dos (as I usually do for actionable non-fiction). By the end of the book, I was asking myself, "Am I living the life I've been called to?" To be fair, I do a lot of reading and listening about mindset. In addition, I was in a community leadership development program last year, went through a "boot camp" for web agency owners earlier this year, and am currently in a mastermind for web agency owners. All of them discussed the importance of mindset. This book shows how the right mindset is the key to success. It tells how by changing your thinking, you can change your life, and the lives of others. It ends with, "May thinking become your greatest tool for creating the world you desire." Notes Focused Thinking Strike a balance between being accessible to those you lead, and withdrawing from them to think. "Walking slowly through the crowd allows me to connect with people and know their needs. Withdrawing from the crowd allows me to think of ways to add value to them." Practice the 10-80-10 principle with people to whom you delegate. Help with the first 10% by casting vision, laying down parameters, providing resources, encouraging. Once they do the middle 80%, help them take it the rest of the way (last 10%). Creative Thinking "It's easy to connect the dots if you know where you're going. Likewise, it's easy to connect ideas when you have a plan." Realistic Thinking "Why not learn all that you can from good thinkers who have faced similar situations in the past? Some of my best thinking has been done by others!" Possibility Thinking Choose to think positively, especially when it doesn't come naturally. George Lucas said, "I'm very cynical, and as a result, I think the defense I have against it is to be optimistic." If you don't want to get into positive thinking, just eliminate all the negative thoughts. When you start telling yourself how something won't work, stop yourself and ask, "What's right about this?" "Dream one size bigger": set goals at least a step beyond what makes you comfortable. Question Popular Thinking Challenge the process. "The greatest enemy of tomorrow's success is sometimes today's success." Shared Thinking "Two heads are better than one - when they are thinking in the same direction. It's like harnessing two horses to pull a wagon. … when they pull together, they can move more weight than the sum of what they can move individually."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jamia

    I didn't love the book which I thought was really lacking in terms of my needs for a social justice framework and addressing systems of inequality...I also hated his idea that only unsuccessful people make decisions motivated by survival. Obviously a high-income straight white male would say that because he hasn't been forced to struggle in a system formed to oppress him... Obviously survival wouldn't occur to those this society deifies... I didn't love the book which I thought was really lacking in terms of my needs for a social justice framework and addressing systems of inequality...I also hated his idea that only unsuccessful people make decisions motivated by survival. Obviously a high-income straight white male would say that because he hasn't been forced to struggle in a system formed to oppress him... Obviously survival wouldn't occur to those this society deifies...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kells Next Read

    Even better the second time around. I always feel recharged and re-focused after listening to Mr Maxwell.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Short and easy to read exceptional and practical book about the importance of thinking! What a concept. well, for me. There is a chapter on each of various types of thinking: big-picture thinking, focused thinking, creative thinking, realistic thinking, strategic thinking, possibility thinking, reflective thinking, questioning popular thinking, benefiting from shared thinking, practicing unselfish thinking and relying on bottom-line thinking. My favorite quote from the book is "the truth will se Short and easy to read exceptional and practical book about the importance of thinking! What a concept. well, for me. There is a chapter on each of various types of thinking: big-picture thinking, focused thinking, creative thinking, realistic thinking, strategic thinking, possibility thinking, reflective thinking, questioning popular thinking, benefiting from shared thinking, practicing unselfish thinking and relying on bottom-line thinking. My favorite quote from the book is "the truth will set you free, but at first it will make you mad". Reminds me of a scripture in the Book of Mormon. It reminds me that whenever someone tells me something I don't want to hear I should listen for and accept the truth in it (and discard what isn't helpful), instead of becoming immediately defensive. The other nugget of wisdom I got was about the importance of planning. That successful people map out or plan their days, and even more successful people plan their weeks, months and years. Of course we've all heard this before, but this was a great reminder to me and I've noticed that putting structure and planning in my days has been extremely helpful!

  8. 4 out of 5

    loafingcactus

    I think by the time one is 25 or so this book had better not have anything to teach or you r doin' it rwong. I'm 40. So. However, this might be a good discussion guide for teaching an advanced high school student or someone in their first job. I think by the time one is 25 or so this book had better not have anything to teach or you r doin' it rwong. I'm 40. So. However, this might be a good discussion guide for teaching an advanced high school student or someone in their first job.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Edney

    The first book in my quest of wading through an annoying genre for some good ideas

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    In How Successful People Think, Maxwell talks about the different types of thinking successful people apply to their everyday lives. The book provides steps on how to change your thinking to elevate your life, and put yourself on the path to whatever you're trying to achieve or succeed in. Success is objective; it will be different for everyone, but in this sense, it's about helping you see the bigger picture for your life. He defines 11 keys to successful thinking: 1. Seeing the wisdom of big-pic In How Successful People Think, Maxwell talks about the different types of thinking successful people apply to their everyday lives. The book provides steps on how to change your thinking to elevate your life, and put yourself on the path to whatever you're trying to achieve or succeed in. Success is objective; it will be different for everyone, but in this sense, it's about helping you see the bigger picture for your life. He defines 11 keys to successful thinking: 1. Seeing the wisdom of big-picture thinking 2. Unleashing the potential of focused thinking 3. Discovering the joy of creative thinking 4. Recognizing the importance of realistic thinking 5. Releasing the power of strategic thinking 6. Feel the energy of possibility thinking 7. Embracing lessons of reflective thinking 8. Questioning the acceptance of popular thinking 9. Encouraging the participation of shared thinking 10. Experiencing the satisfaction of unselfish thinking 11. Enjoying the returns of bottom-line thinking Unselfish thinking stood out to me. I feel a lot of people don't apply this type of thinking, or they do until a certain point or only when it benefits them. So, is it really unselfish thinking? It's so important to give and not be selfish when in a relationship or at a job. Good quotes to take note of on unselfish thinking: "Unselfish thinking can often deliver a return greater than any other kind of thinking. Take a look at some of its benefits: 1. Unselfish thinking brings Personal Fulfillment Few things in life bring greater personal rewards than helping others. Getters generally don't get happiness; givers get it. Helping people brings great satisfaction." "As you go into any relationship, think about how you can invest in the other person so that it becomes a win-win situation. The best relationships are win-win. Why don't more people go into relationships with that attitude? I'll tell you why. Most people want to make sure that they win first. Unselfish thinkers, on the other hand, go into a relationship and make sure that the other person wins first, and that makes all the difference."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    Loy Machedo’s Book Review - How Successful People Think by John Maxwell is another condensed book of Self Improvement / Business where the author tries to summarize the different styles of thinking necessary for success in the Business World. According to the author the 11 keys to successful thinking: 1. Cultivate Big-Picture Thinking 2. Engage in Focused Thinking 3. Harness Creative Thinking 4. Employ Realistic Thinking 5. Utilize Strategic Thinking 6. Explore Possibility Thinking 7. Learn from Reflect Loy Machedo’s Book Review - How Successful People Think by John Maxwell is another condensed book of Self Improvement / Business where the author tries to summarize the different styles of thinking necessary for success in the Business World. According to the author the 11 keys to successful thinking: 1. Cultivate Big-Picture Thinking 2. Engage in Focused Thinking 3. Harness Creative Thinking 4. Employ Realistic Thinking 5. Utilize Strategic Thinking 6. Explore Possibility Thinking 7. Learn from Reflective Thinking 8. Question Popular Thinking 9. Benefit from Shared Thinking 10. Practice Unselfish Thinking 11. Rely on Bottom-Line Thinking Each chapter is roughly 10 pages and usually contains the following style Quotation by famous people Benefits of that style of thinking Tips to improve or become better in that particular style of thinking Short-comings Though I couldn’t help and admire the authors creativity in coming up with the different styles of thinking, I feel the author repeats himself many times and has the same underlyning principle in all his books. I wouldn’t say these are never-known-before-concepts rather more like another drummed up version of Seth Godin’s Linchpin. There are moments where you feel the author is a bit wishy washy or talks in the hocus pocus world, for instance the ‘Think Big Picture’. What if the picture you thought of is not practical or realistic? Overall, there were moments where I just browsed through and some other moments where I really got inspired and intrigued. I would be kidding myself if I said this wasn’t a good book. There are some great moments in this book and I feel there is a lot we can learn from the author. So yes, I would recommend the book anyways. Overall Rating 7 out of 10. Loy Machedo loymachedo.com

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rick Yvanovich

    Excellent read. Its the second book I've read by John Maxwell and I find his style very readable which inspires me to read more of his books. The message in this book resonates with others that I have read such as the Slight Edge and helps hammer home the importance of how you think. Excellent read. Its the second book I've read by John Maxwell and I find his style very readable which inspires me to read more of his books. The message in this book resonates with others that I have read such as the Slight Edge and helps hammer home the importance of how you think.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Vesa Ferizi

    A carry-on summary that might help you stay on track or loyal to your principles (if they're already included in the book). However, it couldn't have been more elaborated because of the style that the author chose. In a nutshell, a worthy read that might be easily forgotten. A carry-on summary that might help you stay on track or loyal to your principles (if they're already included in the book). However, it couldn't have been more elaborated because of the style that the author chose. In a nutshell, a worthy read that might be easily forgotten.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael Huang

    Usual suspects of good advices: Think outside the box; be empathetic; do not blindly follow group-think; be unselfish; collaborate with others...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Thukten Tashi

    A good motivational book. Key to excellence is to focus on few things. We do not need to know 99% of things in life, focus on 1% of thing that gives you return. Indeed! it's worth striving for excellence in few things rather than good performance in many. A good motivational book. Key to excellence is to focus on few things. We do not need to know 99% of things in life, focus on 1% of thing that gives you return. Indeed! it's worth striving for excellence in few things rather than good performance in many.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana Argabright

    I don't normally write reviews, but I'm going to for this book. I don't want to only state everything I disliked about this book, so I'm going to start with the good: Maxwell makes some valid points in his book. I don't disagree with the notion that how you think can set you up for success. I also didn't notice any egregious spelling or grammatical errors in the writing, and generally the sentences flowed well. The bad: 1. The writing. I know I just said the writing flowed well, but that doesn't m I don't normally write reviews, but I'm going to for this book. I don't want to only state everything I disliked about this book, so I'm going to start with the good: Maxwell makes some valid points in his book. I don't disagree with the notion that how you think can set you up for success. I also didn't notice any egregious spelling or grammatical errors in the writing, and generally the sentences flowed well. The bad: 1. The writing. I know I just said the writing flowed well, but that doesn't mean it's good writing. There were a few things that stood out to me about his writing. Firstly, Maxwell is very verbose - to the point that he ends up repeating himself frequently, which makes the book boring. He expresses his main idea and why it's good, then says it's good again, then maybe gives a story about why it's good, etc. The point is, it gets tedious to read. Secondly, Maxwell utilizes many quotes from various figures (from Adolf Hitler to Katherine Hephburn). A well used quote can strengthen an argument, but Maxwell was quoting people so frequently that it felt like I was reading an essay in which the professor had mandated that a certain number of sources must be used. Frequently, I found that the quotes did little for the text and could have been omitted altogether. 2. The language. Maxwell uses very masculine language in his writing, which isn't always a bad thing. But as others have noted in their reviews, he sometimes comes across as privileged and out of touch. Also the section about attending a discounted Broadway show post 9/11 was in poor taste. 3. The content. As I stated, Maxwell does have some good points in his book. However, they are buried among obvious cliches like "think creatively" and "look at the big picture" etc. Many of the ideas didn't feel new or surprising. You could watch a few TED talks and come away with the same ideas, albeit presented more concisely.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bar Franek

    "Life consists of what a man is thinking about all day" A short, but thought-provoking book. This isn't a book that explains how successful people think differently from unsuccessful people, which you might gather from the title. Rather, it explains how to actually think and the different flavors of thinking. Anyone can learn how to think, which is the point of the book, and when you learn this skill you multiply your chances of success- according to the author. A lot of us, entrepreneurs especia "Life consists of what a man is thinking about all day" A short, but thought-provoking book. This isn't a book that explains how successful people think differently from unsuccessful people, which you might gather from the title. Rather, it explains how to actually think and the different flavors of thinking. Anyone can learn how to think, which is the point of the book, and when you learn this skill you multiply your chances of success- according to the author. A lot of us, entrepreneurs especially, are in a constant state of motion, and we don't take the time to spend a few hours, even minutes, to ponder what we're actually doing with our time. This book will make you take a step back and analyze what you're really doing with your effort and what you really want to accomplish. How Successful People Think explains a dozen or so different ways to think: "Big Picture Thinking" "Focused Thinking" "Creative Thinking" "Strategic Thinking" "Possibility Thinking" are just some examples. Good thinking takes time, effort, and practice - its not something you're going to master in a day or two. Taking off a star because some of bullet points about each strategy get a little repetitive. But the book is only l20 or so pages, and it's physically small. It does take some time to get through, because you'll stop yourself a lot to think about what you just read... pun intended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    photogrl2020

    Gotta be at least my 2nd-3rd time reading this book, and it's still good. Definitely gets you thinking! So yes, it does exactly what the title says! Lol. Worth the read-all John Maxwell's books are good and easy reads. Simple to understand, always have little outlines for application/further thought. Highly recommended author. Everyone could learn something from him. Or lots of things. He even speaks at our organization once a yr and we love having him! (the love goes both ways, btw Gotta be at least my 2nd-3rd time reading this book, and it's still good. Definitely gets you thinking! So yes, it does exactly what the title says! Lol. Worth the read-all John Maxwell's books are good and easy reads. Simple to understand, always have little outlines for application/further thought. Highly recommended author. Everyone could learn something from him. Or lots of things. He even speaks at our organization once a yr and we love having him! (the love goes both ways, btw

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bianda

    Change your thinking, change your life. I think that really sums it up.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Diver

    If you're looking for ways to develop your critical thinking and abilities to adapt to an ever changing workplace and indeed world, this is an essential read. If you're looking for ways to develop your critical thinking and abilities to adapt to an ever changing workplace and indeed world, this is an essential read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Abdalla Mamdouh

    نسخة مؤسسة هنداوي غير كاملة http://downloads.hindawi.org/books/ex... نسخة مؤسسة هنداوي غير كاملة http://downloads.hindawi.org/books/ex...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ghuraify Alawi

    This is an excellent book. Although most of the stuff is known by most of readers about thinking and success, John Maxwell puts them in a series and perspective that make the reader suddenly say, ah, I should have noticed this. I liked the coasters about big picture, focus, possibility and unpopular thinking.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brian Thorson

    Great book worth owning (I used a library copy but will likely buy one now) because it has sections that are valuable to reference in the future. Simply written in plain language in a way that enables quick understanding, internalization, and application. Recommend.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Messing

    Love love love. Critical thinking laid out for you.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tariq

    Book written in simple language containing great lessons for constant implementation in life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nita

    Love If you love some good teaching, this is almost as good as hearing him speak it. Some good reminders for all of us on the power of our thoughts.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Garcia

    I really enjoyed the practical approaches he gives in this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    Quite good book, elaborating different type of thinking of successful people

  29. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Deane

    It was interesting! I’ve never thought about all the different kinds of thinking. I enjoyed thinking about it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elias Thomase

    Another great read from John C. Maxwell. This book helps my thought process about investing in others and what it means to be a leader. I am honored to have the opportunity to read this book.

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