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X-Factor by Peter David: The Complete Collection, Volume 1

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Relive the gripping, noir-esque launch of Peter David's most memorable concept: X-Factor Investi- gations! Jamie Madrox sets up a detective agency in the heart of Mutant Town...but with so many duplicates out in the world, who is the real Madrox? Does he even know anymore? Then, when the fallout from the House of M depowers most of the world's mutants, X-Factor must find a Relive the gripping, noir-esque launch of Peter David's most memorable concept: X-Factor Investi- gations! Jamie Madrox sets up a detective agency in the heart of Mutant Town...but with so many duplicates out in the world, who is the real Madrox? Does he even know anymore? Then, when the fallout from the House of M depowers most of the world's mutants, X-Factor must find answers fast! With Guido, Wolfsbane, Siryn, M and Rictor by his side, and joined by the stuff -knowing Layla Miller, Madrox must take on the manipulati ve prescient Mr. Tryp's rival group Singularity Investigations, navigate a superhuman Civil War, learn why the X-Men lied to his team, deal with the unbalanced Quicksilver's new ability to reboot mutant powers for a price...and discover the deadly traitor in X-Factor's midst! COLLECTING: MADROX 1-5, X-FACTOR (2006) 1-12


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Relive the gripping, noir-esque launch of Peter David's most memorable concept: X-Factor Investi- gations! Jamie Madrox sets up a detective agency in the heart of Mutant Town...but with so many duplicates out in the world, who is the real Madrox? Does he even know anymore? Then, when the fallout from the House of M depowers most of the world's mutants, X-Factor must find a Relive the gripping, noir-esque launch of Peter David's most memorable concept: X-Factor Investi- gations! Jamie Madrox sets up a detective agency in the heart of Mutant Town...but with so many duplicates out in the world, who is the real Madrox? Does he even know anymore? Then, when the fallout from the House of M depowers most of the world's mutants, X-Factor must find answers fast! With Guido, Wolfsbane, Siryn, M and Rictor by his side, and joined by the stuff -knowing Layla Miller, Madrox must take on the manipulati ve prescient Mr. Tryp's rival group Singularity Investigations, navigate a superhuman Civil War, learn why the X-Men lied to his team, deal with the unbalanced Quicksilver's new ability to reboot mutant powers for a price...and discover the deadly traitor in X-Factor's midst! COLLECTING: MADROX 1-5, X-FACTOR (2006) 1-12

30 review for X-Factor by Peter David: The Complete Collection, Volume 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    This is an excellently written book, I enjoyed reading it immensely. Jamie Madrox, Multiple Man, sets up a detective agency in Mutant Town, and is joined by several second-tier X-alumnus including Siryn, Wolfsbane, Strong Guy, Monet, and Rictor. All of the convoluted-crap storylines of the headline X-universe is happening concurrently (House of M, another Civil War, another registration act, Quicksilver's regenerative stint, etc., etc.), but takes a back seat to the lives of the current X-Factor This is an excellently written book, I enjoyed reading it immensely. Jamie Madrox, Multiple Man, sets up a detective agency in Mutant Town, and is joined by several second-tier X-alumnus including Siryn, Wolfsbane, Strong Guy, Monet, and Rictor. All of the convoluted-crap storylines of the headline X-universe is happening concurrently (House of M, another Civil War, another registration act, Quicksilver's regenerative stint, etc., etc.), but takes a back seat to the lives of the current X-Factor (which originally was XXX, but they decided that looked too much like the name of a porn establishment). It's very well crafted so that you don't have to have read a bunch of other books in order to fully appreciate the stories in this one. Also on hand is young Layla Miller, who really does know stuff, and she's a mysterious highlight throughout. We see Siryn deal with a particularly brutal abduction and refuse to deal with the death of her father, Rictor come to terms with the loss of his abilities, Jamie deal with being the boss and the perils of workplace romance (Layla calls him "dead man walking"... he brings a whole new meaning to the term "two-timing"!), M letting down her hair a bit, and just on and on. It's really a great collection of characters, and the superhero aspect is just icing on the cake. It's the best-written comic I've picked up in a long time. The art is just okay. There are seven different artists on different sections, and they tried to go for a uniform (and too dark) continuity, with varying levels of success. (What happened to Rahne's hairstyle after the first six issues? Do werewolves get mange?) The art doesn't add to the narrative, but it's okay... the prose is XXX-cellent. Excelsior!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    X-books at their finest... presenting the wonderful world of Peter David's X-Factor. A motley crew of 'b-listers' that you will grow to love and cherish with the devilish storytelling and continuity play. It was because of how much fans liked the Madrox five-parter that X-Factor was relaunched, and it turned out to be well worth the wait after it's long hiatus! This isn't for fans of superheroes stories, its for fans of stories, dark humour and intricate, yet understandable plotting. ...oh and t X-books at their finest... presenting the wonderful world of Peter David's X-Factor. A motley crew of 'b-listers' that you will grow to love and cherish with the devilish storytelling and continuity play. It was because of how much fans liked the Madrox five-parter that X-Factor was relaunched, and it turned out to be well worth the wait after it's long hiatus! This isn't for fans of superheroes stories, its for fans of stories, dark humour and intricate, yet understandable plotting. ...oh and this has Layla Miller :) A very solid 8 out of 12 for me, and one of my rare 4-star reads.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    This is the first comic I've ever read by Peter David, a guy I frequently hear touted as one of the best in the business, particularly for his work on Hulk. I'm not going to judge his entire body of work based just on this X-Factor series (which is highly regarded), but I will say I am thus far fairly unimpressed. This X-Factor series, kicked off by the miniseries Madrox, which totally redefined Multiple Man and the way his powers function, seeks to merge elements of noir with the tried-and-true This is the first comic I've ever read by Peter David, a guy I frequently hear touted as one of the best in the business, particularly for his work on Hulk. I'm not going to judge his entire body of work based just on this X-Factor series (which is highly regarded), but I will say I am thus far fairly unimpressed. This X-Factor series, kicked off by the miniseries Madrox, which totally redefined Multiple Man and the way his powers function, seeks to merge elements of noir with the tried-and-true superhero team format. The end result is a very unfocused, unsure of itself series that, after the 17 issues collected here, feels like it hasn't really done anything. Now, I love character redefinitions. Frank Miller and Brian Michael Bendis's respective Daredevil runs totally reformed the character in an awesome way. Matt Fraction's Iron Fist is incredible. But there's a vast difference between these and what Peter David has done with Multiple Man. The above writers sought to draw out the emotional aspects of these otherwise silly superheroes, and really tell the story from their point of view, defining their lives based on their experiences rather than just their superhero power. Not so with David's Multiple Man. His "redefinition" of Multiple Man really only changes the way the guy's powers work, essentially making him way less powerful of a mutant. Instead of being able to make exact duplicates of himself to do his bidding whenever he wants, now Jamie Madrox has to try a bunch of times to get it right, because when he duplicates, he duplicates only one aspect of his personality, so he could end up with a totally uncooperative, depressed duplicate, or a maniacal dupe based on some deep psychological problem. This is a fine idea, except the way David uses it feels incredibly tedious. We spend a lot of time watching Jamie try to get his powers to work, and almost no time actually getting to know what it must be like for a person with this insane burden and untenable power. So, it basically just amounts to being frustrated for him a lot, and not a lot actually happening. Additionally, David is really not very good at writing a team. X-Factor barely functions as a group, mostly just seeing each mutant run off and do their own thing, or worse, just kind of sit around being useless (as is the case almost always with Monet and Rictor and Rahne). We don't get to spend adequate time with any one character to figure them out, and almost nothing happens that requires an entire team to spring into action, so we're left with a bunch of people who just kind of live in the same house. Also, I don't know where anyone gets off calling this "noir." The only things even remotely noir about it are the art and the fact that X-Factor is apparently a detective agency (though you pretty much never see them detecting anything). Most of the storylines are directly tied to whatever major event was going on at Marvel at the time, be it Civil War or Decimation or whatever, so we also don't have a lot of forward momentum with the foundation of the series itself. It just feels like reading a book full of spin-offs, where nothing that happens really matters. All of that said, it is clear that Peter David is a good technical writer. The book is a quick read and has no real plot holes or inconsistencies (minus one plot twist that I thought was a little stupid, especially with the backpedaling David does to make it make sense in retrospect). I love his characterization of Siryn, and the concept of Layla (a character who can subtly influence the future via the Butterfly Effect) is a cool one. I just wish this book felt like it had any stakes at all.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    You know, I typed in the title of this volume and the first thing that came up was X-Factor Visionaries: Peter David--which is what I think I thought I was getting when I picked this up. This is a weird little book. Honestly, it's a squad of X-Men aslo-rans and bit players: Multiple Man, Strong Guy, Wolfsbane, Siryn, M (from way back in Generation X), and...I don't rightly remember who else. And it wasn't the book I thought I was picking it up. All of that just goes to show how awesome Peter Dav You know, I typed in the title of this volume and the first thing that came up was X-Factor Visionaries: Peter David--which is what I think I thought I was getting when I picked this up. This is a weird little book. Honestly, it's a squad of X-Men aslo-rans and bit players: Multiple Man, Strong Guy, Wolfsbane, Siryn, M (from way back in Generation X), and...I don't rightly remember who else. And it wasn't the book I thought I was picking it up. All of that just goes to show how awesome Peter David is, I guess, because while this wasn't perfect, I absolutely loved it. In fact, I'll be looking to follow up volumes to these collections before I correct my fortunate mistake and go looking for that four volume visionaries set. David makes Madrox an absolutely fascinating lead here, and the exploration of the oddities about his powerset, and the unique manners he uses it here and David's exploration of its ramifiactions are all fantastic. The Tryps and Singularity Investigations make for just the right kind of enemies for comics too, powerful enough in a rich-guy-in-a-suit kind of way to be plenty dangerous and difficult already, and then, if/when the protagonists think and/or superhero their way through those obstacles they've got the power to back their play as well. All this and the best treatment of the supposed "debate" at Marvel in the Civil War era I've encountered in any tie-in or the main-stream books makes this a fantastic set of issues. Oh, if you're tempted to skip the Madrox mini-series that opens the volume in order get to the "main story," don't. First off, because its all kinds of essential for the initial story setting etc. to make any sense, and second--and more importantly--because David & co. present a kick-ass story there too.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    This is actually the second time reading these issues, having owned the first 12 issues digitally, although the Maddrox mini was all new to me. I liked it quite a bit, but didn't love it, at least in the sense that it didn't wow me. David's take on the characters is solid, each with their unique personality quirks. What's engaging is that they all "feel real", meaning like real people, there are some things about them you like and some things you don't and the reader decides just how much they li This is actually the second time reading these issues, having owned the first 12 issues digitally, although the Maddrox mini was all new to me. I liked it quite a bit, but didn't love it, at least in the sense that it didn't wow me. David's take on the characters is solid, each with their unique personality quirks. What's engaging is that they all "feel real", meaning like real people, there are some things about them you like and some things you don't and the reader decides just how much they like a particular character by weighing what's important to them. The members often bicker back and forth but are there for each other in times of need, much like a regular family and for many of them, they've been fellow team members before. These interactions are the most appealing to me. The initial mini-series has a bit of a noir feel, and is very blatant about trying to be, but isn't at the same level as say a Brubaker series. The main X-Factor series seems to drop the noir stuff and focuses on the "inter-family drama" mixed with over-arching mutant issues and their classic villain to battle in their own way. Multiple artists are used, all closely similar in style. Facial expressions are done well, conveying thoughts and feelings in a single panel change. The art tends to be dark, with a drab palette, lots of brown, black and dark green, but it fits the book, giving it a dirtier, grittier atmosphere for a more down-to-earth stories instead of the flashy world-ending books. Continuing the series is now a must for me, not sure why it didn't grab me enough the first time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    This is a good chunk of Peter David's scripts and several talented artists, including the always-interesting coloring of Jose Villarubia. In the first stories, a five-issue/chapter series featuring Jamie Madrox the Multiple Man, the covers by the great David Lloyd just rock. Artist Ryan Sook is almost in that league, too, with some fine storytelling art here. Other artists include Pablo Raimondi, who does well, Dennis Calero, then Ariel Olivetti and Renato Arlem who are ok, fine storytellers. Rec This is a good chunk of Peter David's scripts and several talented artists, including the always-interesting coloring of Jose Villarubia. In the first stories, a five-issue/chapter series featuring Jamie Madrox the Multiple Man, the covers by the great David Lloyd just rock. Artist Ryan Sook is almost in that league, too, with some fine storytelling art here. Other artists include Pablo Raimondi, who does well, Dennis Calero, then Ariel Olivetti and Renato Arlem who are ok, fine storytellers. Recommended.

  7. 5 out of 5

    mkhare

    Madrox 1-5: 5 stars Issues 1-6: 4 stars Issues 7-12: 3.75 stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tomás Sendarrubias garcía

    Uno de los eventos más relevantes que salió de Dinastía de M fue la nueva colección de Factor-X, y el punto fuerte con el que contaba la colección tiraba bastante de nostalgia, y es que Peter David se iba a poner de nuevo frente a una de sus series fetiche. Muchos años atrás, tras la Saga de la Isla Muir, otro momento de reconstrucción de la franquicia mutante, Peter David y Larry Stroman se pusieron al frente de una nueva etapa de una colección ya sólida en el universo Marvel, Factor-X, con una Uno de los eventos más relevantes que salió de Dinastía de M fue la nueva colección de Factor-X, y el punto fuerte con el que contaba la colección tiraba bastante de nostalgia, y es que Peter David se iba a poner de nuevo frente a una de sus series fetiche. Muchos años atrás, tras la Saga de la Isla Muir, otro momento de reconstrucción de la franquicia mutante, Peter David y Larry Stroman se pusieron al frente de una nueva etapa de una colección ya sólida en el universo Marvel, Factor-X, con una alineación y un proyecto nuevo, un grupo de mutantes "a sueldo" del gobierno de Estados Unidos y formado por Kaos, Polaris, Loba Venenosa, el Hombre Múltiple, Mercurio y Guido Carosella (que tomaría el nombre de "Fortachón"). Y David lo llenó todo de humor, consiguiendo un episodio épico alrededor de un bote cerrado de mahonesa, por ejemplo. Y ahora David volvía a Factor-X, con algunos de aquellos personajes de nuevo bajo su tinta. El nuevo equipo estaba formado por el Hombre Múltiple, Loba Venenosa y Fortachón (de los viejos tiempos) y con las incorporaciones de Syrin, M y Rictor; además de un personaje de nuevo cuño, Layla Miller, creada por Bendis para Dinastía de M pero a la que David dotaría de trasfondo y personalidad. La perspectiva era completamente distinta a la del equipo gubernamental, ahora Factor-X es un equipo independiente de detectives afincado en el Barrio Mutante (que acababa de perder a la mayoría de sus residentes durante el Día M) y con el objetivo global de averiguar la verdad sobre la pérdida de poderes de los mutantes. Y en esta primera parte de la colección, Peter David, acompañado de Ryan Sook y otros dibujantes como Dennis Calero que consiguen mantener sorprendentemente bien un tono de coherencia en sus estilos de dibujo, consigue presentar al nuevo equipo y sus dinámicas, con algunas de las mejores escenas que se han vivido en el mundo de cómic (Layla Miller retirando los tornillos de una bañera de manera aparentemente aleatorio para que luego se caiga encima de un asaltante; o Madrox mostrando dobles con diferentes personalidades que resultan ser aspectos de su propia persona), mientras hacen frente a la búsqueda de la verdad tras la Dinastía de M, al enfrentamiento entre detractores y partidarios del Acta de Registro, y sobre todo, a un enigmático grupo llamado Corporación Singularidad, dirigido por un no menos enigmático Damian Tryp. Un trabajo que hay que leer al menos una vez en la vida.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mason

    Jesus Christ I read this way too fast, probably because it sucked me in immediately. I don’t even want to get into how amazing the art was or I’ll be rambling for paragraphs. It’s just really really good. This is my favourite type of super hero comic- where the focus is on the characters as they stop bad guys and such. The group is like a super hero team, they have a base, they have dynamics with each other, and there’s interpersonal drama. Plus, there’s the added advantage of it being a PI agenc Jesus Christ I read this way too fast, probably because it sucked me in immediately. I don’t even want to get into how amazing the art was or I’ll be rambling for paragraphs. It’s just really really good. This is my favourite type of super hero comic- where the focus is on the characters as they stop bad guys and such. The group is like a super hero team, they have a base, they have dynamics with each other, and there’s interpersonal drama. Plus, there’s the added advantage of it being a PI agency, which is badass. I didn’t expect myself to love Jamie Madrox at all, but I really really do. He reminds me heavily of Shawn Spencer from Psych, even looks like him sometimes. I love seeing Rictor, he’s great no matter what. The girls, Monet and Terry, are also great (even though I don’t really like Monet I still like her?? that makes no sense) and I adore Layla Miller (she knows stuff). Man, I’m obsessed with this series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rob Marney

    This collection has all the noir, superhero shenanigans, soap opera drama, and constant quips that you could want from X-Factor. It's connected to current X-events, but not dependent on them. The team is full of likeable, snarky characters. Taken on its own, without the knowledge of the bizarre directions the series eventually went in, it's excellent. This collection has all the noir, superhero shenanigans, soap opera drama, and constant quips that you could want from X-Factor. It's connected to current X-events, but not dependent on them. The team is full of likeable, snarky characters. Taken on its own, without the knowledge of the bizarre directions the series eventually went in, it's excellent.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jase

    Don't expect a lot of superhero powers and villains but a building story where Madrox and company take on Mutant Town, NY in the aftermath of Decimation. A lot of back story for Jamie's origins and the competitor of investigations. Dark noir feel with Terry, Strong Guy, Rahne, Layla Miller, Rictor and the bitchy Monet. Don't expect a lot of superhero powers and villains but a building story where Madrox and company take on Mutant Town, NY in the aftermath of Decimation. A lot of back story for Jamie's origins and the competitor of investigations. Dark noir feel with Terry, Strong Guy, Rahne, Layla Miller, Rictor and the bitchy Monet.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marco Antonio di Forelli

    Peter David sabe lo que se hace, pero el continuo baile de dibujantes es muy mareante. Además, hay algunos recursos que me recuerdan demasiado al cine, lo cual detesto en un tebeo. Fuera de eso, el inicio de una leyenda.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Derek Newman-Stille

    Detective Noire meets mutant in this comic about a small investigative agency set in Mutant Town.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Álvaro

    De lo mejor que le ha pasado nunca al mundo mutante. Y NOIR, muy NOIR.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alam

    Read

  16. 4 out of 5

    Variaciones Enrojo

    Reseña de Eneko Ruiz para Zona Negativa: http://www.zonanegativa.com/oda-a-pet... [...] Madrox: Elecciones múltipes: Madrox a su servicio: No se puede ser más noir En 2004, Marvel encargó a David dar un lavado de cara al hombre múltiple, volviéndolo a traer a la estructura mutante contemporánea de la mano de una serie limitada, bajo el sello Marvel Knights de ésas que ya no se llevan. En sólo cuatro números, el ambiente noir (“desde la perspectiva de Madrox“) en el que PAD había envuelto esta histor Reseña de Eneko Ruiz para Zona Negativa: http://www.zonanegativa.com/oda-a-pet... [...] Madrox: Elecciones múltipes: Madrox a su servicio: No se puede ser más noir En 2004, Marvel encargó a David dar un lavado de cara al hombre múltiple, volviéndolo a traer a la estructura mutante contemporánea de la mano de una serie limitada, bajo el sello Marvel Knights de ésas que ya no se llevan. En sólo cuatro números, el ambiente noir (“desde la perspectiva de Madrox“) en el que PAD había envuelto esta historia auto-contenida ubicada en el Distrito-X (el ghetto mutante) había vuelto a encandilar a los lectores, quienes volvían a tener claro que a un renovado X-Factor tenía muchas historias por contar. Por encargo del editor Andy Schmidt (verdadero promotor de la serie), Madrox se había reconvertido en un detective de los barrios bajos, sedentario, solitario, y sin demasiado trabajo. Su facilidad de palabra y socarronería casi parecía un micrófono abierto para el veterano guionista. El éxito de Alias o Gotham Knights hacía de un Ley y Orden entre mutantes una idea muy atractiva, aunque ni el propio Peter David la comprara en un primer momento. ¿Por qué Madrox iba a fundar una agencia de detectives? Le parecía una decisión arbitraria, pero a nada que se puso a escribir logró darle forma y trató de envolverlo en cierta lógica. Sonaba como una delirante idea sacada de tiesto. Dije, “Claro, suena genial”. Firmé y avancé desde allí, especialmente gracias a los tremendos lápices de Pablo Raimondi. Al final de la mini, el de Maryland dejaba claro que todavía tenía historias por contar en este ambiente, de la mano de una última viñeta que prometía todo lo que estaba por venir: Investigaciones X-Factor una agencia de detectives humilde especializada en casos de Super-héroes, abría sus puertas al mundo. “Ése era el plan, que sirviera como piloto para una renacida serie de Factor X”. X-Factor: La diezma nos sienta tan bien… PAD tenía la idea de una continuación en mente casi desde que comenzara a escribir a Madrox, pero, como siempre, su suerte dependía de las ventas y de la editorial, para lograr luz verde. Era una apuesta fuerte pero arriesgada. El sello de MK le había dado la oportunidad de contar un cómic más adulto, oscuro y personal que el de la media de cómics mainstream, con personajes sobre los que nadie querría leer. La mini-serie había vendido suficientemente bien, había logrado un público de culto y la industria hablaba de ella. Hacerlo funcionar en el mercado general no sería tan fácil. Portada de X-Factor 1, por Ryan Sook Su idea inicial era seguir narrando historias detectivescas alrededor del Barrio Mutante neoyorquino creado por Grant Morrison, pero, ya antes de estrenar serie, los crossovers editoriales afectaron al devenir de sus planes. Al final de Dinastía de M, el “No más mutantes” de Wanda Maximoff había dejado a la población mutie en unos 198. El Distrito X perdía así su razón de ser, ¿o no? Peter David cogió esta vez la sartén por el mango. En vez de dejarse manipular por los eventos editoriales de nuevo -que, tras mucho tiempo, volvían a ser tónica habitual-, los utilizaría como recurso, para mejorar su historia. Al fin y al cabo, lo importante eran sus caracteres, y no tanto el envoltorio. Esta estrategia sirvió de ruta en la cantidad de momentos definitorios por los que habría de pasar la serie durante sus 8 años de recorrido. Eventos que harían añicos su realidad se cruzaban en su camino; El adiós personajes que él había amamantado, y que, como consecuencia, resultaban interesantes para colecciones de ‘primera línea’; el constante cambio de dibujantes (Con más o menos tino, Ryan Sook, Dennis Calero, Ariel Olivetti, Roy Allan Martinez, Renato Arlem, Pablo Raimondi, Khoi Pam, Scot Eaton, Valentine De Landro, Larry Stroman, Marco Santucci, Bing Cansino, Sebastian Fiumara, Emanuela Lupacchino, Paul Davidson, Leonard Kirk y Neil Edwards pasaron por sus páginas)… Numerosos escollos en su camino que en esta ocasión no le llevaron a tirar la toalla, ni siquiera cuando en diciembre 2012 tuvo que superar un derrame cerebral. David es ya perro viejo. Ha escrito todos y cada uno de los números, y su veteranía le ha dado la inteligencia suficiente para tratar con conceptos ajenos y hacerlos suyos. No ajena a altibajos y cambios de dirección, durante 116 capítulos X-Factor se ha convertido en una de las colecciones más regulares de Marvel (en cuanto a calidad y ventas), sin perder de vista su fondo y las relaciones entre los miembros, cuya alineación seguía siendo una de las más eclécticas de la historia. [...] (Reseña completa en: http://www.zonanegativa.com/oda-a-pet... )

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    So good. It's like Gotham Central, but with X-Factor. Basically, Peter David takes a noir approach to this superhero team, with the team acting as a private investigation agency. It's got a great balance of action, humor, and suspense while moving the plot along at a steady pace. This volume covers Madrox #1-5 and X-Factor #1-12 and there's about 20 regular trades worth of stories, so I have barely begun to scratch the surface with this run of X-Factor. So good. It's like Gotham Central, but with X-Factor. Basically, Peter David takes a noir approach to this superhero team, with the team acting as a private investigation agency. It's got a great balance of action, humor, and suspense while moving the plot along at a steady pace. This volume covers Madrox #1-5 and X-Factor #1-12 and there's about 20 regular trades worth of stories, so I have barely begun to scratch the surface with this run of X-Factor.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Okay so I can't keep track of how Doug Ramsey and Warlock are not dead. And I don't get Gambit. And I've never been a fan of Quicksilver. And Lorna Dane/Polaris? And Danger. And yet this was a pretty interesting setup to a book. Danger telling the truth and being told she was wrong was amusing and pretty well done. Quicksilver running back and forth to Havok. All and all I though X-Factor has possibilities. 3.5 of 5. Okay so I can't keep track of how Doug Ramsey and Warlock are not dead. And I don't get Gambit. And I've never been a fan of Quicksilver. And Lorna Dane/Polaris? And Danger. And yet this was a pretty interesting setup to a book. Danger telling the truth and being told she was wrong was amusing and pretty well done. Quicksilver running back and forth to Havok. All and all I though X-Factor has possibilities. 3.5 of 5.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Really interesting exploration of the character of Jamie Madrox, the Multiple Man. The rest of the X-Factor crew isn't too developed, but does play nicely with and against Jamie. The noir-esque story in the limited run Madrox series is nice and more in the vein of Chinatown than The Big Sleep. Really interesting exploration of the character of Jamie Madrox, the Multiple Man. The rest of the X-Factor crew isn't too developed, but does play nicely with and against Jamie. The noir-esque story in the limited run Madrox series is nice and more in the vein of Chinatown than The Big Sleep.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cristhian

    No hay estrellas suficientes para calificar todo el run monumental de Peter David. Su X-Factor es digno de culto y devoción. No hay un número que sea desperdicio. Todos, en la gran pintura, son magnificos. I know stuff.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This is a good noir mystery set in the post-Decimation/House of M mutant world. Well written characters, a bit or humor, and a good mystery. I have to read the second half of this complete collection.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Richard R

    The best X book I ever read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Peter David knows how to use the many X-characters at his disposal. It's refreshing to see someone write them such that their personalities shine adequately. Peter David knows how to use the many X-characters at his disposal. It's refreshing to see someone write them such that their personalities shine adequately.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Morten

    I have never read any X-factor books before and THIS WAS SO COOL! I liked all the characters, just being the strangest detective team ever. Not much fighting, just how I like it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Dela rosa

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Watson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Young

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Clark

  30. 5 out of 5

    Papasmurfiiiviii

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