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Ditch the Pitch: The Art of Improvised Persuasion

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In today’s world, customers don’t want to hear sales pitches, but so many salespeople still rely on them. In his breakthrough handbook, Ditch the Pitch, Steve Yastrow, founder of a successful business strategy consulting firm, asks us to throw out everything we've been taught about pitching to customers. Steve’s advice: tear up your sales pitch and instead improvise persua In today’s world, customers don’t want to hear sales pitches, but so many salespeople still rely on them. In his breakthrough handbook, Ditch the Pitch, Steve Yastrow, founder of a successful business strategy consulting firm, asks us to throw out everything we've been taught about pitching to customers. Steve’s advice: tear up your sales pitch and instead improvise persuasive conversations.Ditch the Pitch is an essential read for salespeople, business managers, and anyone wishing to persuade those around them. Organized into six habits, with each habit consisting of three practices necessary for mastery, Ditch the Pitch is designed to teach Yastrow's approach to fresh, spontaneous, persuasive conversations. These new skills will show the reader how to identify the details that make each customer unique and subsequently navigate a conversation that focuses on the right message for the right customer at the right time.Throughout the book, the author quotes well-known improv comedians and musicians. He translates the techniques these artists use when improvising to create persuasive situations with customers. With the new confidence Ditch the Pitch offers, you will become master of the art of on-the-spot, engaging, and effective customer interactions. Let go of pre-written scripts and embrace Yastrow's guidelines for effortlessly enabling spontaneous conversations that persuade customers to say "yes."


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In today’s world, customers don’t want to hear sales pitches, but so many salespeople still rely on them. In his breakthrough handbook, Ditch the Pitch, Steve Yastrow, founder of a successful business strategy consulting firm, asks us to throw out everything we've been taught about pitching to customers. Steve’s advice: tear up your sales pitch and instead improvise persua In today’s world, customers don’t want to hear sales pitches, but so many salespeople still rely on them. In his breakthrough handbook, Ditch the Pitch, Steve Yastrow, founder of a successful business strategy consulting firm, asks us to throw out everything we've been taught about pitching to customers. Steve’s advice: tear up your sales pitch and instead improvise persuasive conversations.Ditch the Pitch is an essential read for salespeople, business managers, and anyone wishing to persuade those around them. Organized into six habits, with each habit consisting of three practices necessary for mastery, Ditch the Pitch is designed to teach Yastrow's approach to fresh, spontaneous, persuasive conversations. These new skills will show the reader how to identify the details that make each customer unique and subsequently navigate a conversation that focuses on the right message for the right customer at the right time.Throughout the book, the author quotes well-known improv comedians and musicians. He translates the techniques these artists use when improvising to create persuasive situations with customers. With the new confidence Ditch the Pitch offers, you will become master of the art of on-the-spot, engaging, and effective customer interactions. Let go of pre-written scripts and embrace Yastrow's guidelines for effortlessly enabling spontaneous conversations that persuade customers to say "yes."

30 review for Ditch the Pitch: The Art of Improvised Persuasion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nada AbuHassan

    amazing , recommend

  2. 4 out of 5

    Richard Mulholland

    This is a tough review to like as it's a great book that I think most people should read, and I agree with almost everything he says. Or put another way, I agree with probably everything, maybe just to ablesser degree. I think that we should mostly ditch the pitch, the sales preso should be used a whole heap less, however I feel that he's throwing the baby out with the bathwater. I think having certain well crafted stories is a power move, saying something in a different way each time is a terri This is a tough review to like as it's a great book that I think most people should read, and I agree with almost everything he says. Or put another way, I agree with probably everything, maybe just to ablesser degree. I think that we should mostly ditch the pitch, the sales preso should be used a whole heap less, however I feel that he's throwing the baby out with the bathwater. I think having certain well crafted stories is a power move, saying something in a different way each time is a terrible idea. I need to listen to a few of his talks, but I imagine even if he improvises the structure, much of his delivery will be material (that's a good thing). Speaking of improv. Probably the only thing I find more nauseating than listening to jazz is watching improv. It's like a lot of art, I can appreciate that there's magic there, to me it's just a meh though. This would be fine if it wasn't for the fact that the lessons from improv were repeated over and over and over (and over) again. Perhaps the nuances he sees as a practitioner are there, but as a person on the outside it was just the same variation of "yes, and" over "no, but" like a cracked record. After a while it left me thinking that the problem was that the victory condition of improv is fundamentally different to that of a big sale. It's a lot harder to get someone to invest millions in a new IT infrastructure than it is it get people to laugh. Also, if I was investing that much in technology I would definitely not want the ses guy to be winging it. That all said, I still really enjoyed this book and think you would do very well to read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Eikenberry

    The premise is simple. People are persuaded or make decisions based on their reasons, not yours. And so our completely preplanned, preprogrammed, and scripted presentations won’t work. Whether you are a sales person, leader, business owner or parent, you are “pitching” your ideas to others every day, and this easy to follow and read book by Steve Yastrow gives us tangible approaches for doing just that from a logical (but perhaps surprising) perspective. Read more... The premise is simple. People are persuaded or make decisions based on their reasons, not yours. And so our completely preplanned, preprogrammed, and scripted presentations won’t work. Whether you are a sales person, leader, business owner or parent, you are “pitching” your ideas to others every day, and this easy to follow and read book by Steve Yastrow gives us tangible approaches for doing just that from a logical (but perhaps surprising) perspective. Read more...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    This book is about how to improve communication utilizing active listening and improv. The improv portion covers how to to avoid prematurely ending a conversation with a "no" and instead using "yes, and..." (which ties in very well to the concepts addressed by William Ury in many of his books about negotiation). If you haven't read about these concepts before, they're covered quite well in this book. This book is about how to improve communication utilizing active listening and improv. The improv portion covers how to to avoid prematurely ending a conversation with a "no" and instead using "yes, and..." (which ties in very well to the concepts addressed by William Ury in many of his books about negotiation). If you haven't read about these concepts before, they're covered quite well in this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Helfren Filex

    Interesting title by far in 2020. I got hooked instantly and picked it up to start reading. By using the art of improvisation and sizing up the scene in the sales really help on how to negotiate better for the success of sales. By letting the other person talk, it makes them feel better about themselves and ultimately, winning the game of pitch.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Excellent articulation of how developing relationships with customers drive success in sales. Great visual references and concise stories illustrating real life examples of his techniques. Would recommend for anyone currently in any phase of interest with small business or sales.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Grace Suchyna

    My only complaint is that the book was too short. Very interesting and engaging. I would like to hear more, and I think the author has enough experience that he could have delivered more.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Manaswini Condoor

    Short and sweet- A good read for sales pitch!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    Good read a different perspective on persuading

  10. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Noventa

    Good arguments on being attentive during a pitch, conversation, or presentation.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sam Pines

    This was a good perspective on selling and improve. A way to look at sales that I hadn't prior, and there are some quality takeaways for anyone in sales. This was a good perspective on selling and improve. A way to look at sales that I hadn't prior, and there are some quality takeaways for anyone in sales.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Skjam!

    Disclaimer: I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it. Ditch the Pitch This book is subtitled “The Art of Improvised Persuasion”; it’s primarily aimed at salespeople, although the author mentions that the techniques can be used for any persuasive conversation. Most of the focus is on using improvisation techniques to create an interactive connection with the other person, rather than a prepared sales pitch. The author is a marketing consultant whose previous Disclaimer: I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it. Ditch the Pitch This book is subtitled “The Art of Improvised Persuasion”; it’s primarily aimed at salespeople, although the author mentions that the techniques can be used for any persuasive conversation. Most of the focus is on using improvisation techniques to create an interactive connection with the other person, rather than a prepared sales pitch. The author is a marketing consultant whose previous books include We: The Ideal Customer Relationship and Brand Harmony. Much of his research for this volume was done by attending improvisational performances and workshops, and interviewing improvisational performers. Some of the tips presented in this book include active listening, making the conversation about the customer’s story and then making it “our” story by matching the customer’s story with the useful bits of yours, and using “yes, and…” instead of “no” or “yes, but.” It’s a bit much to take all at once, so the author has broken it down into useful habits to work on one or two at a time. This has website support for the dedicated practitioner. This book’s message primarily applies to “real-time” conversations; while improvisational speaking is affected by talent, almost everyone can learn the skills with practice and patience. Despite the reassurances of the author, salesmanship is the main use of the topic in this book. It is less likely to be useful for those in low-level positions where you are expected to complete X number of calls in an hour, or are punished for going “off-script.” I would recommend the book itself primarily to those interested in sales or customer service (which also requires improvisational skills.) I recommend some training in improvisation to everyone who can find time for it; it is very helpful in many areas of life.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Richard Heilbrunn

    Zen of a Relationship (business) My family was excited to see this book arrive at the house and for me to actually have interest in reading it. I take a lot of grief from my family for typically reading philosophy and Buddhist books. In my everyday life I am a family man and a business man. I am usually on the receiving end of the Pitch. I can't count how many times vendors have brought me solutions that make their quotas. secure a promotion for themselves or a cruise that I am not invited to enj Zen of a Relationship (business) My family was excited to see this book arrive at the house and for me to actually have interest in reading it. I take a lot of grief from my family for typically reading philosophy and Buddhist books. In my everyday life I am a family man and a business man. I am usually on the receiving end of the Pitch. I can't count how many times vendors have brought me solutions that make their quotas. secure a promotion for themselves or a cruise that I am not invited to enjoy. Although Ditch the Pitch is not a book on Buddhist philosophy it has a foundation in being present and listening. Attention--- It creates an agile environment without fixed criteria. Anyone who practices Ditch the Pitch is much better prepared to serve their customer, be attentive to their needs and be present to provide a solution that is customer oriented, therefore helping both parties involved. I highly recommend this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    The book Ditch the pitch has a great premise and wonderful advice in how to not just sell things but communicate ideas in a way that doesn't force them down the listener's throat. It's not just useful in management but in developing a collaboration in any industry. The content itself is wonderful. The writing on the other hand could have been edited a bit tighter. The text lacked flow and while repetition of new concepts is necessary to help in remembering, it was done in a way that was almost a The book Ditch the pitch has a great premise and wonderful advice in how to not just sell things but communicate ideas in a way that doesn't force them down the listener's throat. It's not just useful in management but in developing a collaboration in any industry. The content itself is wonderful. The writing on the other hand could have been edited a bit tighter. The text lacked flow and while repetition of new concepts is necessary to help in remembering, it was done in a way that was almost abrasive or forced. I'm not sure what exactly the problem was, possibly more information than needed in the examples and the text, that did not overlap well overall. Considering the topic of ditching the stylized pitch, it read like one of those pitches too much at times. Received in Goodreads Giveaway.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Theodore Kinni

    Yastrow says to drop the canned spiel and apply the principles of theatrical improvisation to your sales engagements. Good stuff!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Frank Taylor

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  18. 4 out of 5

    cynthia flynn

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pyang

  20. 5 out of 5

    Roberto Montrasio

  21. 5 out of 5

    Billy Fischer

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karen Thomas

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Castellano

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tarek Omran

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alex Drost

  26. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marcel Poul

  28. 4 out of 5

    Teddy Brose

  29. 5 out of 5

    Branden Witte

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lukas Björklund

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