website statistics Hacking Leadership - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Hacking Leadership

Availability: Ready to download

Hacking Leadership is Mike Myatt's latest leadership book written for leaders at every level. Leadership isn't broken, but how it's currently being practiced certainly is. Everyone has blind spots. The purpose of Hacking Leadership is to equip leaders at every level with an actionable framework to identify blind spots and close leadership gaps. The bulk of the book is base Hacking Leadership is Mike Myatt's latest leadership book written for leaders at every level. Leadership isn't broken, but how it's currently being practiced certainly is. Everyone has blind spots. The purpose of Hacking Leadership is to equip leaders at every level with an actionable framework to identify blind spots and close leadership gaps. The bulk of the book is based on actionable, topical leadership and management hacks to bridge eleven gaps every business needs to cross in order to create a culture of leadership: leadership, purpose, future, mediocrity, culture, talent, knowledge, innovation, expectation, complexity, and failure. Each chapter: Gives readers specific techniques to identify, understand, and most importantly, implement individual, team and organizational leadership hacks. Addresses blind spots and leverage points most leaders and managers haven't thought about, which left unaddressed, will adversely impact growth, development, and performance. All leaders have blind-spots (gaps), which often go undetected for years or decades, and sadly, even when identified the methods for dealing with them are outdated and ineffective - they need to be hacked. Showcases case studies from the author's consulting practice, serving as a confidant with more than 150 public company CEOs. Some of those corporate clients include: AT&T, Bank of America, Deloitte, EMC, Humana, IBM, JP Morgan Chase, Merrill Lynch, PepsiCo, and other leading global brands. Hacking Leadership offers a fresh perspective that makes it easy for leaders to create a roadmap to identify, refine, develop, and achieve their leadership potential--and to create a more effective business that is financially solvent and professionally desirable.


Compare

Hacking Leadership is Mike Myatt's latest leadership book written for leaders at every level. Leadership isn't broken, but how it's currently being practiced certainly is. Everyone has blind spots. The purpose of Hacking Leadership is to equip leaders at every level with an actionable framework to identify blind spots and close leadership gaps. The bulk of the book is base Hacking Leadership is Mike Myatt's latest leadership book written for leaders at every level. Leadership isn't broken, but how it's currently being practiced certainly is. Everyone has blind spots. The purpose of Hacking Leadership is to equip leaders at every level with an actionable framework to identify blind spots and close leadership gaps. The bulk of the book is based on actionable, topical leadership and management hacks to bridge eleven gaps every business needs to cross in order to create a culture of leadership: leadership, purpose, future, mediocrity, culture, talent, knowledge, innovation, expectation, complexity, and failure. Each chapter: Gives readers specific techniques to identify, understand, and most importantly, implement individual, team and organizational leadership hacks. Addresses blind spots and leverage points most leaders and managers haven't thought about, which left unaddressed, will adversely impact growth, development, and performance. All leaders have blind-spots (gaps), which often go undetected for years or decades, and sadly, even when identified the methods for dealing with them are outdated and ineffective - they need to be hacked. Showcases case studies from the author's consulting practice, serving as a confidant with more than 150 public company CEOs. Some of those corporate clients include: AT&T, Bank of America, Deloitte, EMC, Humana, IBM, JP Morgan Chase, Merrill Lynch, PepsiCo, and other leading global brands. Hacking Leadership offers a fresh perspective that makes it easy for leaders to create a roadmap to identify, refine, develop, and achieve their leadership potential--and to create a more effective business that is financially solvent and professionally desirable.

30 review for Hacking Leadership

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason Luu

    Hacking Leadership: The 11 Gaps Every Business Needs to Close and the Secrets to Closing Them Quickly by Mike Myatt. I don't make it a point to specifically read advice books/self-help books unless they are focused on writing, but I won this from a Goodreads contest. As you might suspect from the long winded title, the problems are apparent from the very onset. The term "hacking" is used erroneously, as though Myatt possesses some deep zen-like perception of business that he has ciphered out and Hacking Leadership: The 11 Gaps Every Business Needs to Close and the Secrets to Closing Them Quickly by Mike Myatt. I don't make it a point to specifically read advice books/self-help books unless they are focused on writing, but I won this from a Goodreads contest. As you might suspect from the long winded title, the problems are apparent from the very onset. The term "hacking" is used erroneously, as though Myatt possesses some deep zen-like perception of business that he has ciphered out and is willing to share with you. Instead, you'll get 183 pages of Myatt generalizing and droning on and on, saying the same thing 11 different ways. Be a good leader (listen, don't go through the motions), when you're not being a good leader, you're not leading, not doing the right thing, and so on. The only reason I decided to finish this book was that he isn't specifically wrong in his advice, but he doesn't need to take 183 pages to give it. I could summarize the useful bits of this in less than 3000 words, but if Myatt isn't willing to do this, why should I? The book could stand significant improvement by shortening its length, organizing the structure more logically, using academic research, or applying narrative tools so that the reader makes the connections without being specifically told what to think. If anything, this book only makes me think less of Forbes for having him as a columnist. Not recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ethan Hulbert

    This book is so full of fluff that all it needs is a pillowcase and you could sleep on it. Honestly, what is the point of this book? What is the thesis of this book, what's the central message? I couldn't tell you. The tagline is that there are 11 gaps every business needs to close. Each chapter talks about "hacking" one of these "gaps" in a way that will make your eyes glaze over just from reading the chapter titles alone: Hacking The Leadership Gap Hacking The Purpose Gap Hacking The Future Gap Hac This book is so full of fluff that all it needs is a pillowcase and you could sleep on it. Honestly, what is the point of this book? What is the thesis of this book, what's the central message? I couldn't tell you. The tagline is that there are 11 gaps every business needs to close. Each chapter talks about "hacking" one of these "gaps" in a way that will make your eyes glaze over just from reading the chapter titles alone: Hacking The Leadership Gap Hacking The Purpose Gap Hacking The Future Gap Hacking The Mediocrity Gap Hacking The Culture Gap Hacking The Talent Gap Hacking The Knowledge Gap Hacking The Innovation Gap Hacking The Expectation Gap Hacking The Complexity Gap Hacking The Failure Gap Are you tired of the words "hacking" and "gap" yet? Too bad, because each chapter section (on average 5-9 sections per chapter) is called some other variation of this. For instance, in the Hacking the Innovation Gap chapter, you will learn about: Hacking the Idea Trap Hacking the Change Gap Hacking the Gap between Incremental and Disruptive Hacking the Next Level Hacking the Competition Hacking the Flexibility Gap The only thing I'm hacking is my lunch back up my throat. I mean this is a book that's 182 pages long and yet I couldn't tell you what the heck it's about. I think it probably has plenty of good advice buried in here but there is no logical organization and no evidence or real world backing ever really put into play. Why are there 11 gaps and not 10 or 12? How were these gaps determined? Just because, I guess. How many times do we have to put the words "hacking" and "gap" on a page until you no longer register any meaning at all when your eyes glaze across them? This book hacks the eye glaze gap. Wait, was that a chapter? It could have been. The whole thing reads like the author took the phrase "Hacking the _____ Gap" and just filled it in with buzzword after buzzword and then treated it like a creative writing exercise to talk about each random phrase that was generated. Except there was not enough creativity, not nearly enough. Unfortunately this book couldn't hack the creativity gap and ended up falling into the disorganized mess gap, which was unable to be hacked. The only reason I hacked the purchase gap for this book was so I could hack the reading gap for my book club at work, where they hacked the January book gap and hacked the selection gap with this choice. I hacked the truly wish gap that they'd have hacked the picking something else gap instead gap. Hack. Gap hack. Gap.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Eikenberry

    Over the years I have had the privilege to get to know some of the smartest leadership minds on the planet. And occasionally, because of these relationships, I get to read their newest work before it gets published. Such is the case with Mike Myatt and his new book (releasing today) Hacking Leadership. I read an advanced uncorrected proof of this book, and for at least three reasons, I am glad I did. Read more... Over the years I have had the privilege to get to know some of the smartest leadership minds on the planet. And occasionally, because of these relationships, I get to read their newest work before it gets published. Such is the case with Mike Myatt and his new book (releasing today) Hacking Leadership. I read an advanced uncorrected proof of this book, and for at least three reasons, I am glad I did. Read more...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tita Leelathipkul

    Hacking Leadership was my external reading for my Leadership Class. It is absolutely a great book with many learnings for executives to take care of their own business. It basically highlights the important skills and thoughts that good leaders should have.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melinda Torrison

    One of the best leadership books. Highlighted almost the entire book. So many good nuggets of wisdom.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Soundview Executive Book Summaries

    Hacking Leadership: The 11 Gaps Every Business Needs to Close and the Secrets to Closing Them Quickly by Mike Myatt was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2014. THE SOUNDVIEW REVIEW: Blind spots can produce a dangerous set of circumstances for any organization and its leaders. Mike Myatt, CEO of N2growth and the author of the best-seller Leadership Matters, calls these blind spots “gaps.” In Hacking Leadership, he helps executives tackle 11 gaps tha Hacking Leadership: The 11 Gaps Every Business Needs to Close and the Secrets to Closing Them Quickly by Mike Myatt was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2014. THE SOUNDVIEW REVIEW: Blind spots can produce a dangerous set of circumstances for any organization and its leaders. Mike Myatt, CEO of N2growth and the author of the best-seller Leadership Matters, calls these blind spots “gaps.” In Hacking Leadership, he helps executives tackle 11 gaps that can be detrimental to any leader. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary. The best leaders, according to Myatt, have the ability to check their egos and elevate their level of self-awareness. It requires an understanding of three critical gaps described in the book: development, influence and reality. From this starting point, Hacking Leadership then guides executives through each of the 11 gaps. The gaps range from anticipated subjects such as knowledge and talent to less explored areas such as mediocrity and expectation. Within each of the overarching gaps, Myatt focuses on individual aspects that could be termed “component gaps.” For example, the chapter on hacking the culture gap includes an examination of how to handle the courage gap. Even in areas in which executives may feel that their own organization has a minimal, or nonexistent, gap, Myatt’s insight deserves consideration. He writes, “Culture shouldn’t be imposed upon people — as co-creators of the culture, the people are the culture.” It is a simple declaration but should cause leaders to question whether their organizations truly embody the principle Myatt describes. Hacking Leadership makes the point that “hacking” is a method of innovating that requires leaders to “innovate around best practices in pursuit of next practices.” Myatt provides numerous sparks to light the fires of innovation for any leader that reads this book. Soundview's 8-page Executive Book Summary of Hacking Leadership is available here.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joe McFadden

    Gaps exist in every organization. Turn gaps into opportunities. While this is a business book, the applications for pastors and churches are endless. Pretty much any time he said “business” you could apply it to churches. I could not agree more that churches have gaps in them and these gaps, if they go untouched, keep the church from fulfilling why God placed the church here. Here are the gaps, see if any of these sound familiar to you: Leadership gap – “we don’t have enough leaders or volunteers.” P Gaps exist in every organization. Turn gaps into opportunities. While this is a business book, the applications for pastors and churches are endless. Pretty much any time he said “business” you could apply it to churches. I could not agree more that churches have gaps in them and these gaps, if they go untouched, keep the church from fulfilling why God placed the church here. Here are the gaps, see if any of these sound familiar to you: Leadership gap – “we don’t have enough leaders or volunteers.” Purpose gap – “where are we going, why do we exist, why are we doing what we’re doing?” Future gap – “what is next, how do we reach the next generation, how do we make choices?” Mediocre gap – “it’s good enough for church.” Culture gap – “this gets at why things are done without thinking (ie. we’ve always done it this way)”. Talent gap – “who is being developed, how do you hire people, how do you raise up leaders.” Knowledge gap – “how do you communicate, do leaders and volunteers know how to make decisions that line up with the vision.” Innovation gap – “how will your church go to the next level and reach the next generation.” Expectation gap – “are ministries aligned or are they silos doing their own thing?” Complexity gap – “how clear is your strategy, how busy is your church, how many layers and committees does it take to get an answer to a question.” Failure gap – “how does your church or leaders handle failure when it happens?” And it will happen. Very relevant to leadership in church as well as business! The author has a great writing style that includes several “sticky statements”. Here are a few: Holding a position of leadership is not the same thing as being a good leader. The plausibility of impossibility only becomes a probability in the absence of leadership. Businesses don’t fail, projects don’t fail, and products don’t fail—leaders fail. The only boarders to leadership are those which are self-imposed. Leadership isn’t just a role or title-it’s a choice. Real leaders don’t limit themselves, but more importantly they refuse to limit those they lead.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jjudyfl

    I won this book from Goodreads. Hacking is such a negative word. It distracted me immediately. Many seem to be praising this book, so perhaps I should offer some negativity. What some call theories, I call assumptions. Not all business situations and problems can be easily boxed up with a quickie label on them. There IS a lot of potential value here, but I question how it can help someone who is currently a bad leader, in a bad situation to just up and start working miracles? I did read some excell I won this book from Goodreads. Hacking is such a negative word. It distracted me immediately. Many seem to be praising this book, so perhaps I should offer some negativity. What some call theories, I call assumptions. Not all business situations and problems can be easily boxed up with a quickie label on them. There IS a lot of potential value here, but I question how it can help someone who is currently a bad leader, in a bad situation to just up and start working miracles? I did read some excellent NEW ideas for INCOMING leaders. Read this book. Especially if you are going to be "the new guy."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Henderson

    We hear the term "gap" used frequently in business today. Mike Myatt has aptly used the term in the subtitle to his newest book, "Hacking Leadership". Mr. Myatt writes of the gaps that many businesses have, as well as the steps that business leaders can take to close the gap, and greatly improve their chances for success in today's increasingly competitive marketplace. "Hacking Leadership" helps to make us aware of our blind spots. While we may not like to face the fact that we have them, we all We hear the term "gap" used frequently in business today. Mike Myatt has aptly used the term in the subtitle to his newest book, "Hacking Leadership". Mr. Myatt writes of the gaps that many businesses have, as well as the steps that business leaders can take to close the gap, and greatly improve their chances for success in today's increasingly competitive marketplace. "Hacking Leadership" helps to make us aware of our blind spots. While we may not like to face the fact that we have them, we all do. The book is easily read, rapidly applied, and a key book in a leader's book shelf.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Becky Robinson

    If you want to grow as a leader, I suggest you add this title to your library. It will challenge on every page. I love Myatt's view that leadership is about those we lead -- it is not about us. We are effective as leaders as we succeed in elevating others and helping them to shine. Buy this book and share it with others! If you want to grow as a leader, I suggest you add this title to your library. It will challenge on every page. I love Myatt's view that leadership is about those we lead -- it is not about us. We are effective as leaders as we succeed in elevating others and helping them to shine. Buy this book and share it with others!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I received the book for free through Good reads First Reads and it is not the type of book I usually read. That said, it was informative and easy to read. It had a lot of really great ideas and was quite thought provoking. If you buy in a little or buy in a lot, all of the ideas can be used on their own or as a whole. Myatt clearly knows what he is talking about.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    I don't know if Mike Myatt is a Christian or not, but he gets a lot right. Some people challenge common leadership practices as a cop out to abdicate. Myatt challenges both the common assumptions and the cop out. I don't know if Mike Myatt is a Christian or not, but he gets a lot right. Some people challenge common leadership practices as a cop out to abdicate. Myatt challenges both the common assumptions and the cop out.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    This book shows what is going on in corporate America today as leaders are not leading effectively & thus their employees & businesses are failing. This book shows what 11 gabs every business needs to close quickly to be more productive in todays corporate culture..

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pilar

    A lot of generalizations and common places. His opinions are valid, but he certainly did not need a +180 pages long book to share them. The user Jason Luu made most points for me in his review from April 11, 2014.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Basically, focus on the right things while taking risks and learning from your mistakes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro Winiker

    Interesting, but nothing new

  17. 4 out of 5

    Traever

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dave Bemis

  19. 5 out of 5

    Umakant Jani

  20. 5 out of 5

    Steven Hatch

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sune Hansen

  22. 4 out of 5

    James Cole

  23. 5 out of 5

    Clint Babcock

  24. 4 out of 5

    Raven Lee

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andy Leichtle

  26. 5 out of 5

    Espen Thun

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  28. 5 out of 5

    chen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Kinkade

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ronn Foster

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...