website statistics Artemisia - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Artemisia

Availability: Ready to download

Artemisia Gentileschi, born in 1598, the daughter of an esteemed painter, taught art in Naples and painted the great women of Roman and biblical history. She could neither read nor write, and she was the reviled victim in a public rape trial, rejected by her father, and later abandoned by her husband. Nevertheless, she was one of the first women in modern times to uphold t Artemisia Gentileschi, born in 1598, the daughter of an esteemed painter, taught art in Naples and painted the great women of Roman and biblical history. She could neither read nor write, and she was the reviled victim in a public rape trial, rejected by her father, and later abandoned by her husband. Nevertheless, she was one of the first women in modern times to uphold through her work and deeds the right of women to pursue careers compatible with their talents and on an equal footing with men. This edition features a new introduction by the celebrated critic and writer Susan Sontag. Anna Banti, the pen name of Lucia Lopresti, was born in Florence in 1895. Trained as an art historian, she turned to novels, stories, and autobiographical prose in the 1930s. Artemisia, her second novel, published in 1947, is the most acclaimed of the sixteen works of fiction she published during her long life, and is considered a classic of twentieth century Italian literature. Her last, harrowingly confessional novel, A Piercing Cry (Un grido lacerante), appeared in 1981. Banti also wrote art criticism and monographs on painters (Lorenzo Lotto, Fra Angelico, Velázquez, Monet), literary criticism and film reviews, and translated novels by Thackery, Colette, Alain Fournier, and Virginia Woolf. She died in Ronchi di Massa (Tuscanny) in 1985.


Compare

Artemisia Gentileschi, born in 1598, the daughter of an esteemed painter, taught art in Naples and painted the great women of Roman and biblical history. She could neither read nor write, and she was the reviled victim in a public rape trial, rejected by her father, and later abandoned by her husband. Nevertheless, she was one of the first women in modern times to uphold t Artemisia Gentileschi, born in 1598, the daughter of an esteemed painter, taught art in Naples and painted the great women of Roman and biblical history. She could neither read nor write, and she was the reviled victim in a public rape trial, rejected by her father, and later abandoned by her husband. Nevertheless, she was one of the first women in modern times to uphold through her work and deeds the right of women to pursue careers compatible with their talents and on an equal footing with men. This edition features a new introduction by the celebrated critic and writer Susan Sontag. Anna Banti, the pen name of Lucia Lopresti, was born in Florence in 1895. Trained as an art historian, she turned to novels, stories, and autobiographical prose in the 1930s. Artemisia, her second novel, published in 1947, is the most acclaimed of the sixteen works of fiction she published during her long life, and is considered a classic of twentieth century Italian literature. Her last, harrowingly confessional novel, A Piercing Cry (Un grido lacerante), appeared in 1981. Banti also wrote art criticism and monographs on painters (Lorenzo Lotto, Fra Angelico, Velázquez, Monet), literary criticism and film reviews, and translated novels by Thackery, Colette, Alain Fournier, and Virginia Woolf. She died in Ronchi di Massa (Tuscanny) in 1985.

30 review for Artemisia

  1. 5 out of 5

    Violet wells

    There’s a great quote from Susan Sontag in the introduction to this novel which made me think of Hilary Mantel’s stunning achievement in the Cromwell novels: To write well about the past is to write something like fantastic fiction. It is the strangeness of the past, rendered with piercing concreteness, that gives the effect of realism. Artemisia is in some ways a forerunner of Mantel’s Cromwell novels. The boldness and imaginative intensity with which Banti allows herself to be possessed by Arte There’s a great quote from Susan Sontag in the introduction to this novel which made me think of Hilary Mantel’s stunning achievement in the Cromwell novels: To write well about the past is to write something like fantastic fiction. It is the strangeness of the past, rendered with piercing concreteness, that gives the effect of realism. Artemisia is in some ways a forerunner of Mantel’s Cromwell novels. The boldness and imaginative intensity with which Banti allows herself to be possessed by Artemisia is similar to Mantel’s wholehearted immersion into the intimate life of Cromwell. Like Mantel, Banti gives herself licence to imagine and invent descriptive details which bring her character vividly to life. Where this novel differs is it doesn’t have the compelling drama of an exciting historical bigger picture. This is more a study of a character in isolation. Banti endeavours to capture Artemisia in her solitude, where her paintings are conceived and created. At the beginning of the novel Banti is trying to console herself for the loss of a manuscript. It is 1944 and she has evidently spent the war writing a novel about Artemisia Gentileschi. When the Germans blew up Florence’s bridges everyone living in the vicinity of the bridges was evacuated. Banti’s manuscript therefore was destroyed along with her home. It’s not clear why she doesn’t take the manuscript with her. Clearly there were many things that meant more to her. But the irony is, the loss of one version of the novel heralds the creation of what you feel in your bones is a much more daring and brilliant version. It should be said Banti leaves a lot out. If you know nothing about Artemisia you might get the feeling from this novel that her accomplishments were less important than history has deemed them. Often we see her in moments of deep insecurity; rarely in any moment of triumph. Banti doesn’t seek to give us any kind of detailed chronology of Artemisia’s achievements. She is more interested in what Artemisia feels than what she does. As Banti says, “Artemisia is not pleased…She was expecting more, above all a logical, calm account, a carefully considered interpretation of her actions, the very thing that I can no longer give her, for she is too close to me.” It’s as though Artemisia is some kind of spirit guide who is helping Banti get through the hardships of the war - because this novel is as much about the inspiration and sustenance that Banti derived from the pioneering Artemisia as it is about Artemisia herself. Paradoxically though it’s when Banti shows us Artemisia in the larger context of history that this novel really shines. As for example its depiction of Artemisia’s lonely journey across Europe when her idolised father summons her to the English court. Here Banti brilliantly makes us appreciate just how difficult it was for a woman to make her own way in the seventeenth century The prose is incredibly rich and painterly. If I open the novel at random to read a passage this is what I get: “The slight wind increased, the bellies of the vessels creaked as they rocked on their moorings, and a swarm of rowboats could be seen rushing swiftly to shore, shaving the sides of the ships, the oarsmen competing vigorously and with loud shouts to overtake each other.” This is pretty typical of how visually vibrant and intimate is Banti’s prose. It’s a beautifully written novel, every sentence intricately chiselled and crafted (full marks to the translator as well). Huge thanks to Aubrey for recommending it. https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/9...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Arybo ✨

    Nel buio, nella brutalità del fragore di guerra, sotto le mie palpebre strette a forza, il volto d'Artemisia s'infoca come quello di una donna litigiosa: potrei toccarlo e le vedo in mezzo alla fronte quella ruga verticale che ebbe dalla prima età e non fece che approfondirsi. Da sonnambula furibonda si mette a urlarmi nell'orecchio: ha la voce roca, l'accento smozzicato della popolana di Borgo, mezzi consunti ma non esauribili nei disperati, di esprimersi, di giustificarsi. E che cos’altro ha Nel buio, nella brutalità del fragore di guerra, sotto le mie palpebre strette a forza, il volto d'Artemisia s'infoca come quello di una donna litigiosa: potrei toccarlo e le vedo in mezzo alla fronte quella ruga verticale che ebbe dalla prima età e non fece che approfondirsi. Da sonnambula furibonda si mette a urlarmi nell'orecchio: ha la voce roca, l'accento smozzicato della popolana di Borgo, mezzi consunti ma non esauribili nei disperati, di esprimersi, di giustificarsi. E che cos’altro ha fatto Artemisia se non giustificarsi, dai quattordici anni in su? Devo ringraziare @Better call Eve per avermelo consigliato. ❤️ Erano anni che volevo leggere questo testo, da quando ne aveva parlato la professoressa di letteratura italiana alla triennale. Anna Banti è famosa soprattutto per aver scritto Noi credevamo, ma in ambiente artistico la signora è conosciuta per aver elaborato Artemisia e, principalmente, per essere stata la moglie di Roberto Longhi, con il quale ha poi fondato la rivista Il Paragone. Sono felice di aver letto questo testo perché è come un faro per coloro che poi hanno riscritto la vita di Artemisia Gentileschi. Senza questo libro, ad esempio, non ci sarebbe stato Blood Water Paint, che consiglio a chi adora la poesia. L’immagine di una donna forte e combattiva non sempre coincide con l’immagine che Artemisia ha di se stessa. L’autrice mescola la sua voce a quella dell’artista, rendendo il racconto un po’ contorto, ma molto bello ed appagante. Si comincia con l’infanzia di Artemisia a Roma, e contemporaneamente si leggono i pensieri dell’autrice, scritti dopo i bombardamenti nei quali è andato distrutto il primo manoscritto di questo libro. L’autrice prende così l’occasione per intrecciare i propri pensieri, che cercano di richiamare alla memoria frasi già scritte e situazioni già descritte, con i pensieri dell’artista, in una ottica di rivalutazione dell’operato artistico femminile del seicento.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Roger Brunyate

      A Difficult Knot to Untie Artemisia Gentileschi This book was recommended to me by someone who read it in Italian, and at first I tried to do the same. But it seemed strangely difficult, even though I use the language often in my operatic work, so after 50 pages I switched to this translation by Shirley D'Ardia Caracciolo. Certainly, this solved the problem of Anna Banti's unusually large vocabulary, although Caracciolo's translation seems dense and dull by comparison, conveying the sen   A Difficult Knot to Untie Artemisia Gentileschi This book was recommended to me by someone who read it in Italian, and at first I tried to do the same. But it seemed strangely difficult, even though I use the language often in my operatic work, so after 50 pages I switched to this translation by Shirley D'Ardia Caracciolo. Certainly, this solved the problem of Anna Banti's unusually large vocabulary, although Caracciolo's translation seems dense and dull by comparison, conveying the sense but failing to find an equivalent to the light springing rhythm characteristic of Banti's prose. But it was still a tricky knot to untie, because the same qualities that make the novel so original also make it hard to follow. "Anna Banti" was the pen-name of Lucia Lopresti (1895-1985), a scholar and essayist, writing on aspects of Italian art and history. This, her first novel, began as an imaginative reconstruction of the life of the painter Artemesia Gentileschi, the first and virtually only woman in 17th-century Italy to gain acceptance comparable to her male colleagues. Banti had just finished the novel in draft form when, in August 1944, her house in Florence was blown up in a rearguard action by German troops evacuating the city, and the manuscript was destroyed. In wakening Artemisia to life once again, the author was no longer content with a straight biography but, as she explains in a preface to the reader, wanted to set down her own emotions as well: shaken by events, but both possessed by and possessing Artemisia. So scenes in the crowded streets in baroque Rome alternate with crowds of refugees in the Boboli Gardens in Florence, fleeing the mined buildings and huddling on the grass to avoid being machine-gunned (no wonder I had a hard time following!). And in the middle of all that, the ghost of Artemisia: "Silently she moans, like a Medusa among her snakes, and once again she is supine, crushed in a white sleep of dust, turning her head to one side like a woman in death searching for her last breath. Dusk has overtaken us; this time yesterday Florence and all her stones were solid, everything that they sheltered was intact. Down below in the city, the last beams are caving in; there are reports of mysterious fires burning among the rubble." One further difficulty is chronology. Little was known of Artemisia's life at the time Banti was writing, so if readers check her account against modern information in Wikipedia, say, they will find considerable discrepancies. There is also the fact that, after drafting Artemisia's story presumably in sequence, she was now recapturing it as a timeless whole: "Having been driven out of the rational time-setting of her story, she now carries all her ages with her mysteriously." So we know that Artemisia had been raped as a teenager well before the occasion is described. We see her being subjected to torture before we realize that this is a legal requirement to prove her former virginity in her father's suit against her attacker. We meet someone described as her father-in-law pages before we are told of her arranged marriage. And we hear about her fame and the paintings on which it is based before most of them have even been painted. Many of these are of women being exploited by men (such as Susanna and the Elders) and women getting their revenge (such as Judith and Holofernes). Artemisia was an accomplished artist, and one with an agenda. Whether told linearly, or with author and subject folded together in an emotional knot that transcends time, Artemisia's is a stirring story, a locus classicus of feminism. But the reader should be warned: it does not make for easy reading. ====== It seems a shame not to end with a gallery, because Artemisia was really a splendid painter and—to a larger extent than most—an autobiographical one. Witness her self-portrait above, her studies of raped or dishonored women… Lucretia Susannah Mary Magdalen …or her fierce heroines from the Old Testament, taking revenge into their own hands: Delilah and Samson Jael and Sisera Judith and Holofernes

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aubrey

    4.5/5 All the forms of an extreme rebellion against a fact of nature seemed preferable to a pain that had not yet been given shape by the words of others, words so simple and commonplace, horribly new and unacceptable. I think we can all agree that, in reference to the most aged of defined terms of "rhetoric", pathos is both the most volatile and the most disparaged. In contrast to the ethos and the logos, reputation in fact and word in form, there are neither dictionaries to consult nor citat 4.5/5 All the forms of an extreme rebellion against a fact of nature seemed preferable to a pain that had not yet been given shape by the words of others, words so simple and commonplace, horribly new and unacceptable. I think we can all agree that, in reference to the most aged of defined terms of "rhetoric", pathos is both the most volatile and the most disparaged. In contrast to the ethos and the logos, reputation in fact and word in form, there are neither dictionaries to consult nor citations to cross reference, nothing standardized that commits one choice to that is so, this other one to that is like. Sociology and anthropology and whatever other fields involving one set of humans thinking themselves satisfactorily equipped to "study" another do not count, for a lexicon of cultural terminology or a guide book for tourism do not a level field of power playing make. Anna Banti née Lucia Lopresti did not retrieve Artemisia from the bowels of her obliterated manuscript of mind and soul for the sake of a paper in a journal or a slide under a microscope. When it comes to the equilibrium of pathos, there is nothing safe about attempting to circumscribe an other, however much the Powers That Be have forgotten Faust. Compared to the scale of the universe, times of terrible devastation are not even a shiver, even though the universe of human memory might say otherwise. And man had trusted to paper, wood and stone, materials much more solid than the human body, so that human civilization might continue. But now books, sculptures, paintings are violently scattered and turned to ashes, while the genius who created them is reduced to a faceless entity, driven from the stone where he stood with joined feet, trembling on the edge of the precipice. So that I, alive, am almost unable to say where, at this exact moment, is the portrait of the young woman and the words: Artemisia Gentileschi. This edition's a lurid sort that was likely joined together by those who didn't know exactly where to put it. On the one hand, the prose is smooth but rather standard, the events with a certain touch of future flow normally enough, and all in all the train of historical fiction is good, but not brilliant. On the other this is a work that was translated into English and introduced by Susan Sontag for merits of chronological reclamation and metafictional endeavor, reborn from the collapse of WWII as one soul cried out to another who could not help but set down in ink and prose, transcribed from the breed of communion that would make both the History Major and the English Major faint. As one who is easily reeled in by the style of Modern Library and Penguin Modern and New York Book Review Classics, I can assure you that I and many others would have passed it by if the cover offered itself alone. Judge, judge not, and mayhap the Sontag would have drawn a few eyes and whet a few appetites, but the fact remains that this is a perfect example of what the 500 GBBW prescriptive provides. If an image is worth a thousand words, what is the love of a reader and writer? "Look at these two women," she should of said, "two of the best, the strongest, two who most resemble exemplary men. See how they have been driven to being false and disloyal to one another in the world that you have created for your own use and pleasure. We are so few and so besieged that we can no longer recognize or understand or even respect each other as you men do. You set us loose, for fun, in an arsenal of poisonous weapons. And so we suffer..." Reputation versus skill. The weight of shame facing off against the will of talent. Torture in the courtroom, blood in the chiaroscuro, a war of worlds in the middle of WW II with the possessed demanding such and the possessor with the usual titles: the only woman, the only case, the only status granted in spite of what usually begets only suffering between a human's legs. The writer's resonance may have the advantage of three less centuries, but soon enough the self-titled first world will be reenacting yet another self-enamored war, all of the technological advantage and none of the ethically incline. During those four official and many more not so lauded years, a few may pick up this work out of keyword recognition, a reremembered initiative, a lone piece that had not yet been met with a matching gaze. "To write well about the past is to write something like fantastic fiction. It is the strangeness of the past, rendered with piercing concreteness, that gives the effect of realism." -Susan Sontag Artemisia, Artemisia. Hunted, or hunter. What terrible masters words turn out to be.

  5. 4 out of 5

    LW

    Giuditta che decapita Oloferne - Artemisia Gentileschi In questo quadro di feroce intensità e di grande forza espressiva c'è molto dell'arte e del temperamento di Artemisia , il vermiglio della coperta di velluto a contrasto con il bianco del lino e quel sangue che forma dei gioiosi nastri di porpora, rivo per rivo , come un ricamo traducono su tela il suo desiderio di rivincita e di giustizia , la fierezza di una donna , che reagisce e che con determinazione supera le proprie sofferenze (il qua Giuditta che decapita Oloferne - Artemisia Gentileschi In questo quadro di feroce intensità e di grande forza espressiva c'è molto dell'arte e del temperamento di Artemisia , il vermiglio della coperta di velluto a contrasto con il bianco del lino e quel sangue che forma dei gioiosi nastri di porpora, rivo per rivo , come un ricamo traducono su tela il suo desiderio di rivincita e di giustizia , la fierezza di una donna , che reagisce e che con determinazione supera le proprie sofferenze (il quadro è stato dipinto a pochi anni di distanza dalla violenza sessuale subita da Agostino Tassi ) È stata una lettura "impervia" , soprattutto per la lingua utilizzata ( però ci si abitua in fretta, dopo poche pagine) ma ne è valsa la pena Ho potuto conoscere meglio Artemisia una donna coraggiosa, forte (anche se ha le sue fragilità sotto la corazza da dura) intelligente , piena di talento , testarda , orgogliosa , uno spirito indomito e indipendente leggere della sua vita è stata un'avventura - molto piacevole e avvincente- un viaggio nel tempo . È impressionante quanto sia stata moderna (e bizzarra per i suoi tempi) ha vissuto esperienze molto dure, è stata spesso incompresa, ferita dalle voci e dalle cattiverie della gente , ma non si è lasciata sopraffare, affrontando con le proprie forze nuovi inizi, a testa alta. Molto bello il viaggio finale che la porta in Inghilterra, da sola ; là ritrova il padre e il riconoscimento della sua arte , in un rapporto tra pari , qualcosa che va al di là delle parole tra padre e figlia, nel linguaggio a entrambi familiare , della luce , delle forme dei colori .

  6. 5 out of 5

    FerroN

    Estate 1944. Seduta sulla ghiaia nei giardini di Boboli, Lucia è in lacrime per la devastazione lasciata dal bombardamento tedesco; Firenze sconvolta, la distruzione della sua casa e il manoscritto del racconto “Artemisia”, sepolto sotto le macerie, perduto per sempre. Sfollati che vagano attoniti, gruppi formati per mutuo soccorso, donne che litigano per l’acqua di una fontanella; ma, all’improvviso, la voce di una giovinetta viene a distrarla dal suo dolore. È la cara (e “forse troppo diletta”) Estate 1944. Seduta sulla ghiaia nei giardini di Boboli, Lucia è in lacrime per la devastazione lasciata dal bombardamento tedesco; Firenze sconvolta, la distruzione della sua casa e il manoscritto del racconto “Artemisia”, sepolto sotto le macerie, perduto per sempre. Sfollati che vagano attoniti, gruppi formati per mutuo soccorso, donne che litigano per l’acqua di una fontanella; ma, all’improvviso, la voce di una giovinetta viene a distrarla dal suo dolore. È la cara (e “forse troppo diletta”) Artemisia. Lucia si alza e rincorre la ragazzina per i vialetti del giardino; la realtà si confonde con l’immaginazione, i momenti di una vita vissuta tre secoli prima si susseguono e si sovrappongono al presente. Anna e Artemisia, Lucia e Misia; l’una e l’altra. Il filo del racconto prende a oscillare tra i ricordi dell’una e la voce dell’altra, per poi stabilizzarsi – in seguito allo stupro subìto da Artemisia adolescente – sulla rotta dei trasferimenti e dei viaggi della giovane pittrice; gli anni trascorsi a Roma, Firenze, Napoli e il lunghissimo, avventuroso viaggio per mare (Genova, Marsiglia) e via terra (Francia) alla volta dell’Inghilterra. “Artemisia” è un unico capitolo di centottanta pagine, senza respiro, intervallato soltanto da spaziature tra i paragrafi nei casi di lunghi salti temporali. Con una prosa splendida, a volte poetica, Anna Banti racconta la vita interiore e professionale di Artemisia Gentileschi con un livello d’immedesimazione stupefacente. Come sfumature o ritocchi applicati sulla tela in punta di pennello, la pagina scritta è un continuo fiorire di dettagli; l’espressione di un volto, una smorfia, un gesto o un movimento impercettibile, un pensiero o un sentimento definiti nello spazio di una o due righe: immagini, a volte minute, a volte potenti, che si sedimentano nel profondo ed emergono poi, dopo ore o giorni, in modo prepotente e sorprendente. Originale e quasi inclassificabile (né biografia romanzata né romanzo storico, forse un po’ entrambi), omaggio sentito e sincero, “Artemisia” di Anna Banti dà nuova vita a una pittrice quasi dimenticata.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Anna Banti's novel, 'Artemisia' is an extraordinary novel, both for its subject and for its author. It's a novel that combines a biographical side, the 17th-century artist Artemisia Gentileschi, a woman who insisted that her art was to.be taken seriously. A hugely difficult task at that time. Banti, herself an art historian, knows the work inside out. Her descriptions of the paintings are marvellous. I can see them, even without the paintings in front of me. And while I know some of these painti Anna Banti's novel, 'Artemisia' is an extraordinary novel, both for its subject and for its author. It's a novel that combines a biographical side, the 17th-century artist Artemisia Gentileschi, a woman who insisted that her art was to.be taken seriously. A hugely difficult task at that time. Banti, herself an art historian, knows the work inside out. Her descriptions of the paintings are marvellous. I can see them, even without the paintings in front of me. And while I know some of these paintings in my head, others have been brought to life by Banti's descriptions and will resonate even more when I get a chance to look at them again. Banti also writes about the horror of rape. She writes about betrayal, and about a court system that punishes the woman alone. To be unmarried in Italy at this time was a crime if you were a woman. Not in the legal sense, but in the social sense. And so, Artemisia marries. but it is a strange marriage, a marriage of two people who only gradually grow fond of one another, but then when Artemisia is offered a way out of poverty, neither of them can cope with the change in power in the relationship. The manuscript of this book was first completed in 1944, but was then destroyed during the war when the author was living in Naples. The novel incorporates the novelist's point of view along with Artemisia's story. Sometimes the two perspectives merge. It is remarkable for the ease with which Banti changes perspective and time. But in this she is able to intensify the feelings of loss, of force of circumstance and the accidents of all our lives. For Gentileschi and Banti alike, they are shaped by events beyond their control. What could be worse for a novelist than to lose the just completed manuscript and then to have to sit down and rewrite it. What could be worse for a woman, than to be raped and then have to confront a legal system that is stacked against you. The rewriting by Banti is reflected in the recreating of Artemisia in her life and through this novel. The novel, finally finished in 1947, remains fresh and experimental more than 60 years later. Postmodernists who don't know their history proclaim as new novels that take far few risks than this one. Until reading this novel, I had not heard of Anna Banti, but I will seek out her other work. She ought to be far better known. But like Artemisia Gentileschi, perhaps that will take several more generations. A terrible shame.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cabbot

    Un'opera estremamente singolare con un'alta qualità stilistica. Anna Banti ci racconta la vita di Artemisia Gentileschi attraverso un romanzo che è difficile da classificare: né biografia, né romanzo storico. Banti ci dà un ritratto di una persona che altrimenti sarebbe soltanto stata ricordata nelle note dei manuali di storia dell'arte, e il cui destino meritava invece di essere conosciuto e ricordato come esemplare. Artemisia fu "una delle prime donne che sostennero colle parole e colle opere Un'opera estremamente singolare con un'alta qualità stilistica. Anna Banti ci racconta la vita di Artemisia Gentileschi attraverso un romanzo che è difficile da classificare: né biografia, né romanzo storico. Banti ci dà un ritratto di una persona che altrimenti sarebbe soltanto stata ricordata nelle note dei manuali di storia dell'arte, e il cui destino meritava invece di essere conosciuto e ricordato come esemplare. Artemisia fu "una delle prime donne che sostennero colle parole e colle opere il diritto al lavoro congeniale e a una parità di spirito fra i sessi". In certi momenti, Banti si proietta essa stessa sulla scena, spia di nascosto Artemisia, e il lettore osserva Banti che osserva e racconta Artemisia nel suo difficile percorso di donna nel 1600. Figlia, sorella, moglie, madre, ma prima di tutto pittrice; sempre col carboncino o col pennello in mano. La stessa genesi del romanzo è singolare: il libro, nato come racconto e scritto nella primavera del 1944, va perduto "per eventi bellici che non hanno, purtroppo, nulla di eccezionale", ma rinasce come romanzo sulle macerie di un Paese liberato. Quest'opera meriterebbe di stare nei libri di Storia della Letteratura e di essere studiato a scuola, invece l'ho conosciuto solo all'università. In Italia, queste donne straordinarie, continuano a venire dimenticate o relegate in piccoli capitoletti intitolati "la letteratura femminile", come se fosse altro, come se non meritassero lo stesso spazio che viene regalato agli uomini. È stato anche difficile trovare il romanzo. L'ho cercato in biblioteca, nelle librerie, ma l'ho trovato solo su Amazon, e solo perché lo conoscevo e mi aveva incuriosito.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Jimenez

    Anna Banti perdió el manuscrito de su novela en los bombardeos de Florencia de 1944. Entonces se propuso no escribir el mismo libro, sino meditar sobre el mismo y dialogar con Artemisia Gentileschi en una biografía que en realidad es un experimento en forma de introspección psicológica y de estudio de las mentalidades del Barroco, pero también de una mujer avanzada a su época pero inmersa en ella, y no tanto una pura reconstrucción histórica. El estilo de Banti está lleno de imágenes únicas y re Anna Banti perdió el manuscrito de su novela en los bombardeos de Florencia de 1944. Entonces se propuso no escribir el mismo libro, sino meditar sobre el mismo y dialogar con Artemisia Gentileschi en una biografía que en realidad es un experimento en forma de introspección psicológica y de estudio de las mentalidades del Barroco, pero también de una mujer avanzada a su época pero inmersa en ella, y no tanto una pura reconstrucción histórica. El estilo de Banti está lleno de imágenes únicas y reflexiones profundas. No es un libro fácil -no hay diálogos ni división en capítulos- pero es una experiencia de una riqueza y una delicadeza infrecuentes en la literatura del siglo XX.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nuria Castaño monllor

    Maravilloso

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Dickens

    This Artemisia novel is the third I have read--the others were several years ago. Anna Banti's novel is full of descriptive passages and narrative interspersed with very little dialogue. It was not what I would call a page-turner, but the descriptions were powerful and compelling. It was compelling in the sense that it made me think about her character, but I needed to do it a few pages at a time. This accounts for the long time I took to finish it. I understand that not a lot of historical fact This Artemisia novel is the third I have read--the others were several years ago. Anna Banti's novel is full of descriptive passages and narrative interspersed with very little dialogue. It was not what I would call a page-turner, but the descriptions were powerful and compelling. It was compelling in the sense that it made me think about her character, but I needed to do it a few pages at a time. This accounts for the long time I took to finish it. I understand that not a lot of historical fact about Artemisia was available to Banti, but she certainly took what was and ran with it. Published in Italy in 1947, it was Banti's second attempt to write the Artemisia novel. The first manuscript was destroyed in the devastation of World War II. The book is said by some to be neither biography nor historical fiction, but a melding of the two. It is also a dialogue between Artemisia of the 1600's and Banti of three centuries later--a somewhat strange going back and forth between that dialogue and the unfolding events of Artemisia's life, filled in with much imagination due to a lack of available biographical record. There was a famous rape trial of her youth, and then knowledge of where she was at certain periods of her life due in part to the record of her art sales. As Banti exposes us to the Artemisia character of her book, we experience some sense of what being a famous artist must have been like for her in a time when it was virtually unheard of a woman being an artist and self-supporting. Banti's Artemisia seems sad much of her life with the only bright spot being her art. She misses her husband and mourns the loss of him for her whole life, though she had chosen her art career over following him at quite a young age. Her other important relationship was the one with her father. Her father, Orazio, a celebrated artist in his own right, was her teacher and mentor. In Banti's book he was emotionally distant from her, caring mainly about the art. He appeared to relate to her only through their shared passion. She is with him at his death and devastated by the loss. I would definitely recommend this book, written about a woman who dared to follow her passion, and written before the Women's Liberation movement of the late 1900's by a woman successful in her own right as a writer.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    The novel opens with Artemisa addressing her creator/biographer "Non piangere" It's absolutely one of my favorite openings, conveying so much in a few words, the relationship between the renaissance artist and the twentieth century author, the particular challenges for the two female creators, their shared experience of disaster. That relationship is the one of the most intriguing and pleasurable aspects of the book. The other is Banti's gorgeous, challenging, evocative prose. Her effort to evok The novel opens with Artemisa addressing her creator/biographer "Non piangere" It's absolutely one of my favorite openings, conveying so much in a few words, the relationship between the renaissance artist and the twentieth century author, the particular challenges for the two female creators, their shared experience of disaster. That relationship is the one of the most intriguing and pleasurable aspects of the book. The other is Banti's gorgeous, challenging, evocative prose. Her effort to evoke what Gentileschi might have been thinking or feeling is often powerful: however, her insistence on her anguished relationship to her largely absent father and to her husband to whom she was so briefly married was baffling at times. I would have loved to hear more about the paintings, especially since Banti was also an accomplished art historian.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lauracio

    Libro scritto in modo aulico e meraviglioso. Troppo poco conosciuto, dovrebbe essere letto in Italia, porca miseria, dovrebbero conoscerla in tanti questa scrittura ricca, complessa. Detto questo. Io l'ho odiato. Non so perché. Ho lottato per finirlo. Libro scritto in modo aulico e meraviglioso. Troppo poco conosciuto, dovrebbe essere letto in Italia, porca miseria, dovrebbero conoscerla in tanti questa scrittura ricca, complessa. Detto questo. Io l'ho odiato. Non so perché. Ho lottato per finirlo.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Juliana

    My review: https://theblankgarden.com/2018/08/02... My review: https://theblankgarden.com/2018/08/02...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paolo del ventoso Est

    Davvero faticoso leggere questo romanzo biografico, con uno stile woolfiano, ricco di pagine dalla prosa gorgheggiante e luminosa, ma onestamente troppo denso, impastato come una tavolozza di colori rappresi. Artemisia Gentileschi è un personaggio affascinante, una che "scottata mille volte al bruciore dell'offesa, mille volte si fa indietro e prende fiato per lanciarsi di nuovo nel fuoco". Anna Banti, più che il suo alter ego, è una fan talmente sfegatata da volersi fondere con essa, adoratrice Davvero faticoso leggere questo romanzo biografico, con uno stile woolfiano, ricco di pagine dalla prosa gorgheggiante e luminosa, ma onestamente troppo denso, impastato come una tavolozza di colori rappresi. Artemisia Gentileschi è un personaggio affascinante, una che "scottata mille volte al bruciore dell'offesa, mille volte si fa indietro e prende fiato per lanciarsi di nuovo nel fuoco". Anna Banti, più che il suo alter ego, è una fan talmente sfegatata da volersi fondere con essa, adoratrice che plasma il suo idolo e ci piange, ci dialoga, si scusa per le "irrispettose divagazioni".

  16. 4 out of 5

    Artemisia

    La cosa che più mi fa rabbia* è non averlo potuto leggere in originale: solitamente si acquista un libro in inglese per leggerlo in anteprima, per esercitare la lingua, o altro. Questa volta è successo l'inaspettato. Ho dovuto leggerlo in inglese, perché la Bompiani si ostina a non ripubblicare l'Artemisia della Banti e la Mondadori non ne vuole sapere di raccogliere la sua opera omnia nei Meridiani. E non riesco nemmeno ad immaginare a quanto possa essere devastante questo libro in italiano. No La cosa che più mi fa rabbia* è non averlo potuto leggere in originale: solitamente si acquista un libro in inglese per leggerlo in anteprima, per esercitare la lingua, o altro. Questa volta è successo l'inaspettato. Ho dovuto leggerlo in inglese, perché la Bompiani si ostina a non ripubblicare l'Artemisia della Banti e la Mondadori non ne vuole sapere di raccogliere la sua opera omnia nei Meridiani. E non riesco nemmeno ad immaginare a quanto possa essere devastante questo libro in italiano. Non sarò capace di leggere e farmi piacere mai più nessun'altra biografia della Gentileschi dopo questa. Sarà la forte impronta della Bellonci che regna sulla mano di Lucia Lopresti, sarà questo modo di raccontare vite lontanissime riportandole alla luce come corpi sotto le macerie, sarà questa intimità quasi indecente con cui Artemisia viene seguita in ogni pensiero, ogni gesto, ogni passo da noi lettori che non meriteremmo questa fenice meravigliosa di libro (cit.), questo miracolo sulla guerra, lo sforzo più estremo di una scrittrice che resta, ancora, penosamente ignorata dalle grandi quanto dalle piccole case editrici. Concludo con quello che già un altro utente su aNobii aveva utilizzato per chiudere il suo commento a Noi credevamo (tutto in tiro nella sua nuova veste editoriale, con tanto di linda fascetta, e per questo si ringrazia devotamente il film di Mario Martone): che vergogna. * cioè, ma guarda tu se non posso leggerlo in italiano perché la Bompiani non lo ripubblica! Ma mannaggia a loro...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    Interesting read but you need to peel it and peel it before you get the logistics of narrator and occurrence. Difficult read and mighty personality which captures the crux of her dilemma and the time she lived in. Far beyond the degree to accuracy of most historical fiction. I can only imagine the courage it took to voice her attack and also to walk a path to her vocation as an artist.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eleonora Voltolina

    Già solo che il manoscritto della prima versione di questo libro fosse andato perduto durante la guerra, nel 1944, e che l’autrice abbia avuto la cazzimma di rimettersi a scriverlo da capo – pubblicandolo nel 1947 – per me vale mille punti e da solo l’acquisto e la lettura. Perché una storia nella storia non ha prezzo. Se poi ci aggiungiamo che è un romanzo dedicato a una delle pochissime donne che riuscirono a diventare pittrici e a farsi riconoscere in questa professione, alla fine del Rinascime Già solo che il manoscritto della prima versione di questo libro fosse andato perduto durante la guerra, nel 1944, e che l’autrice abbia avuto la cazzimma di rimettersi a scriverlo da capo – pubblicandolo nel 1947 – per me vale mille punti e da solo l’acquisto e la lettura. Perché una storia nella storia non ha prezzo. Se poi ci aggiungiamo che è un romanzo dedicato a una delle pochissime donne che riuscirono a diventare pittrici e a farsi riconoscere in questa professione, alla fine del Rinascimento, si capisce quanto la prospettiva della narrazione sia femminista. Considerando infine che é un capolavoro di scrittura – ecco, leggetelo.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Giuls (la_fisiolettrice)

    “Una delle prime donne che sostennero colle parole e colle opere il diritto al lavoro congeniale e a una parità di spirito fra i due sessi.” Artemisia è stata oltraggiata, vittima di un processo di stupro in giovane età e per “rimediare” all’onore sposa un vicino di casa, Antonio, che le darà anche una figlia, Porziella, ma sarà incapace di seguirla quando ella deciderà di spostarsi in una casa signorile per progredire con la sua carriera di pittrice. Nonostante l’affetto i due si lasciano e ciò “Una delle prime donne che sostennero colle parole e colle opere il diritto al lavoro congeniale e a una parità di spirito fra i due sessi.” Artemisia è stata oltraggiata, vittima di un processo di stupro in giovane età e per “rimediare” all’onore sposa un vicino di casa, Antonio, che le darà anche una figlia, Porziella, ma sarà incapace di seguirla quando ella deciderà di spostarsi in una casa signorile per progredire con la sua carriera di pittrice. Nonostante l’affetto i due si lasciano e ciò sarà motivo di dolore e sofferenza per Artemisia, perché anni dopo Antonio, di ritorno da uno dei suoi viaggi, deciderà di accompagnarsi con una “moretta”. Anna Banti ha il potere di dipingere Artemisia, come se la pittrice fosse lei e ci regalasse spaccati di pensieri e di ritratti della vita di questa donna, anima fragile, istintiva, tenace nel farsi rispettare in un mondo prettamente maschile. Artemisia sa cosa significa il sacrificio degli affetti per elevare la sua virtù di pittrice, per rincorrere una passione che sente viscerale. Queste due donne si rincorrono tra le pagine e creano un dialogo di pensieri magnetico, entrare non è facile ma poi una volta dentro si è risucchiati in un vortice di flashes e immagini che fanno viaggiare attraverso usi e costumi dell’epoca. E’ così che partendo da Roma ci ritroviamo a Firenze, poi a Napoli, dove Artemisia farà scuola, poi su una barca alla volta della corte inglese, per ricongiungersi con un padre di cui fin da bambina ha voluto seguire le orme. “Di tappa in tappa, sui sedili di cuoio logoro, riprese a nutrirsi, di pensieri torbidi, svolti e ravvolti, monotamente, intorno a immagini di vita irrevocabile, disapprovata, non mai finita di soffrire.” Nostalgica, ostinata, forte, Artemisia. Amo le letture che mi mettono alla prova e Anna Banti è stata una bella sfida che ho apprezzato tanto, per la cura delle parole e lo stile grandioso.

  20. 5 out of 5

    La Central

    "No es fácil ser mujer en un mundo de hombres por eso resulta tan fascinante la figura de Artemisia Gentileschi. Al margen de toda tutela masculina, consiguió hacerse un hueco en un ámbito considerado exclusivo de los hombres. Su obra obtuvo por méritos propios el difícil reconocimiento académico y profesional de sus contemporáneos. Fue la primera mujer aceptada en la prestigiosa Accademia del Disegno de Florencia e incluso llegó a dirigir su propio taller en Nápoles, en el que solo trabajaban h "No es fácil ser mujer en un mundo de hombres por eso resulta tan fascinante la figura de Artemisia Gentileschi. Al margen de toda tutela masculina, consiguió hacerse un hueco en un ámbito considerado exclusivo de los hombres. Su obra obtuvo por méritos propios el difícil reconocimiento académico y profesional de sus contemporáneos. Fue la primera mujer aceptada en la prestigiosa Accademia del Disegno de Florencia e incluso llegó a dirigir su propio taller en Nápoles, en el que solo trabajaban hombres y que respondía a peticiones de clientes de toda Europa. No hay duda de que fue una artista reconocida y respetada en su época pero casi inmediatamente a su muerte, a mediados del siglo XVII cayó en el olvido y su rastro se esfumó de la historia del arte durante siglos. Hubo que esperar hasta el siglo XX para que su nombre fuera rescatado de las sombras y convertido en icono feminista. La primera versión de este libro se escribió en el año 1944 pero el manuscrito desapareció bajo los escombros de la casa de la escritora, destruida por las bombas alemanas. Anna Banti, tenaz, reescribió la novela que, finalmente fue publicada en 1947. Es esta una historia de perseverancia. No solo de su autora que, paciente, reescribió el relato sino también de su protagonista que, en contra de todo, luchó y rompió las cadenas del patriarcado para dedicarse a lo que más le gustaba y lograr vivir de ello. Triunfó gracias a su coraje en una época en la que una carrera independiente en las artes era casi impensable para una mujer." Raquel Ungo

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hesper

    Had to hurry through the last third of this; due without renewal option. Is it biography? Is it historical fiction? It blends the two, transcends them, becomes a sort of impressionistic psychological portrait reconstituted out of one part history and nine parts imagination. The author occasionally breaks through the narrative and holds conversations with her subject—these interludes were simultaneously absorbing and distracting. There are sharp literary chops on display, but Artemisia the book s Had to hurry through the last third of this; due without renewal option. Is it biography? Is it historical fiction? It blends the two, transcends them, becomes a sort of impressionistic psychological portrait reconstituted out of one part history and nine parts imagination. The author occasionally breaks through the narrative and holds conversations with her subject—these interludes were simultaneously absorbing and distracting. There are sharp literary chops on display, but Artemisia the book succeeds most when Artemisia the character is allowed to remain a symbol. All of it is an interpretation.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Irene Rosignoli

    Non è fiction, non è storia, non è biografia: Artemisia è un libro difficilissimo da inquadrare. Si tratta di una lunga conversazione immaginaria mista a immedesimazione psicologica della Banti con il personaggio storico di Artemisia. Non esistono così tante fonti storiche che descrivano questa donna al punto da giustificare una tale esplorazione psicologica; incredibile quindi il lavoro dell'autrice nel ricostruire questa figura mettendoci del suo e rendendola un suo doppio, ma anche un simbolo Non è fiction, non è storia, non è biografia: Artemisia è un libro difficilissimo da inquadrare. Si tratta di una lunga conversazione immaginaria mista a immedesimazione psicologica della Banti con il personaggio storico di Artemisia. Non esistono così tante fonti storiche che descrivano questa donna al punto da giustificare una tale esplorazione psicologica; incredibile quindi il lavoro dell'autrice nel ricostruire questa figura mettendoci del suo e rendendola un suo doppio, ma anche un simbolo del femminismo in generale.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bárbara

    La historia, como sabemos, nunca ha sido (es) justa con las mujeres. Artistas, reinas, heroínas o artesanas suelen caer en el olvido colectivo o, en el mejor de los casos, figurar como secundarias en algún libro. Sin embargo, a veces las circunstancias y el compromiso de algunas y algunos consiguen que el error se enmiende y que sus nombres se lean con más frecuencia y empiecen a sonar en más bocas. Puede que este sea el caso de Artemisia Gentileschi, pintora italiana del siglo XVI, a quien much La historia, como sabemos, nunca ha sido (es) justa con las mujeres. Artistas, reinas, heroínas o artesanas suelen caer en el olvido colectivo o, en el mejor de los casos, figurar como secundarias en algún libro. Sin embargo, a veces las circunstancias y el compromiso de algunas y algunos consiguen que el error se enmiende y que sus nombres se lean con más frecuencia y empiecen a sonar en más bocas. Puede que este sea el caso de Artemisia Gentileschi, pintora italiana del siglo XVI, a quien mucha gente ha (hemos) descubierto recientemente. 🔹 Artemisia, como tantas otras, padeció una doble (quién sabe si triple o cuádruple) discriminación: por ser mujer y por escoger un oficio que, por época, no le correspondía; uno de hombres además (faltaría más...). Artemisia era buena en lo suyo, pero era mujer. Y por si esta injusticia, que se dio durante toda su vida, no fuera suficiente, hasta ahora lo que más se conocía de su historia es que fue violada y humillada en el posterior juicio. De su obra, poco. Por suerte, parece que eso está cambiando. 🔹 En su libro, Anna Banti, entremezcla la biografía de la pintora italiana con la suya propia, concretamente con su exilio durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Aunque el experimento resulta muy interesante, el estilo de esta autora, demasiado hermético por momentos, no me ha dejado conectar del todo con lo que me contaba. Tampoco ha ayudado la puntuación del texto; llamadle fricada, pedantería o deformación profesional, pero es tal el exceso (y a veces mal uso) de comas que leía a trompicones, como si me pusieran zancadillas. 🔹 Total, que, siendo un libro no muy extenso, he tardado bastante en leerlo. 🔹 Aun así, os animo con todas mis fuerzas a que descubráis a Artemisia y a todas esas mujeres que la historia (escrita, casi siempre, por hombres) nos ha querido ocultar. Se lo debemos. Nos lo debemos.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This book took a little work, about the first 35 pages or so, to get into, but after that it was pretty wonderful. Part of the trouble in the beginning is that there's a complicated conceit- the author wrote this book once before and that manuscript was lost or destroyed, and now she is trying to recreate it. The author is doing so by telling the reader about her need to recreate, as well as talking to the novel's subject, and occasionally turning the novel over to Artemisia to narrate, switch f This book took a little work, about the first 35 pages or so, to get into, but after that it was pretty wonderful. Part of the trouble in the beginning is that there's a complicated conceit- the author wrote this book once before and that manuscript was lost or destroyed, and now she is trying to recreate it. The author is doing so by telling the reader about her need to recreate, as well as talking to the novel's subject, and occasionally turning the novel over to Artemisia to narrate, switch from 3rd to first person. Once your past that though, you have a story of a historical figure who was impressive, fictionalized into a more fleshed out person than we would be able to know just from historical records. Artemisia is a frustrating character. She is very talented and has all these strong loves in the story, but her ambition for becoming a great artist and her pride lead her to be successful, but to lose everyone she values (except perhaps for her brother Francesco) due to her refusal to compromise. And of course, as time goes on, she regrets this more and more. It is kind of the general story of making art, because there is no end point to success, so an artist can never relax. It is heartbreaking without being melodramatic. Lovely writing, and vastly more interesting than I would have expected. I think this would pair well Enrigue's Sudden Death.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ludovica

    Un libro difficile e amaro, che sono contenta di aver cercato in lungo e in largo (è praticamente introvabile anche qui in Italia!). Questa "biografia" tutta particolare rende evidente il legame incredibile instauratosi tra l'autrice Anna Banti e la straordinaria pittrice Artemisia; in uno sforzo di memoria e attraverso una prosa composita, mutevole, a tratti indomabile, Banti simula le pennellate ambiziose, sdegnose, di sfida che più di tre secoli prima lanciava Artemisia, donna pittrice che ha Un libro difficile e amaro, che sono contenta di aver cercato in lungo e in largo (è praticamente introvabile anche qui in Italia!). Questa "biografia" tutta particolare rende evidente il legame incredibile instauratosi tra l'autrice Anna Banti e la straordinaria pittrice Artemisia; in uno sforzo di memoria e attraverso una prosa composita, mutevole, a tratti indomabile, Banti simula le pennellate ambiziose, sdegnose, di sfida che più di tre secoli prima lanciava Artemisia, donna pittrice che ha fatto della sua condizione un'affermazione di orgoglio, vincendo traversie personali e dinamiche storiche più che avverse. Ringrazio l'autrice per aver reso omaggio ad un personaggio che la storia (forse ad eccezione di quella dell'arte) ha dimenticato, concedendole spazio e nuova vita; consiglio il romanzo a chiunque voglia unirsi al processo di rievocaZione delle sorti di Artemisia, sperando di contribuire a restituirle sempre maggiore dignità.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    La storia non ha preso la piega che mi aspettavo. Piuttosto che incentrarsi sulla giovinezza e il caso di stupro, si è focalizzata sugli anni dopo, la carriera, i viaggi e il matrimonio. Non che mi sia dispiaciuto, anzi. Anna Banti dipinge con le parole uno straordinario ritratto di donna, la diffidenza e il dolore trasudano da ogni pagina e fanno malissimo, ma allo stesso tempo danno conforto. Ci si sente in qualche modo compresi a leggere di Artemisia, del suo odio per gli uomini e per il ruol La storia non ha preso la piega che mi aspettavo. Piuttosto che incentrarsi sulla giovinezza e il caso di stupro, si è focalizzata sugli anni dopo, la carriera, i viaggi e il matrimonio. Non che mi sia dispiaciuto, anzi. Anna Banti dipinge con le parole uno straordinario ritratto di donna, la diffidenza e il dolore trasudano da ogni pagina e fanno malissimo, ma allo stesso tempo danno conforto. Ci si sente in qualche modo compresi a leggere di Artemisia, del suo odio per gli uomini e per il ruolo di donna. Si prova un senso di claustrofobia verso la società e le sue aspettative, e un forte desiderio di libertà. La scrittura di Anna Banti è densa e complessa, ammetto che in alcuni passaggi ho fatto un po' fatica perché non leggo spesso romanzi così stratificati. All'inizio soprattutto è stato difficile calarsi nella narrazione, dato che presente e passato si mescolavano in un unico piano narrativo, in cui l'autrice dialoga con il suo personaggio come fosse un fantasma, fermo tra le macerie belliche lì con lei. Però, una volta superato lo scoglio delle prime 20 pagine, si viene totalmente calati nel romanzo ed è impossibile non farsi travolgere dall'amarezza e dalla rabbia di Artemisia, così magistralmente raccontata. Non ho mai letto nulla del genere! Sicuramente leggerò altro di Anna Banti, ma aspetterò un po'. Devo ancora riprendermi dallo spessore del suo narrare.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    Banti's historical fiction about the Renaissance painter Artemisia Gentileschi is a wonderfully creative take on the genre, being both biographical (of Banti's house fire which destroyed her original writings) and fictional novel (of Artimisia's personal journeys as a painter in Italy and England). The story of the artist is enthralling, but it is brought to life through Banti's creative feminist narrative on a woman operating in, and excelling in, a man's world (something Banti shares with her Banti's historical fiction about the Renaissance painter Artemisia Gentileschi is a wonderfully creative take on the genre, being both biographical (of Banti's house fire which destroyed her original writings) and fictional novel (of Artimisia's personal journeys as a painter in Italy and England). The story of the artist is enthralling, but it is brought to life through Banti's creative feminist narrative on a woman operating in, and excelling in, a man's world (something Banti shares with her subject).

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Art history needs more novels like this one. Historical fiction doesn't have to be so linear and stuffy. It can be like this book; Imaginative, investigatory, and insightful. For that historical context and what not, pair this with Mary Garrad's Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image Of The Female Hero In Italian Baroque Art Art history needs more novels like this one. Historical fiction doesn't have to be so linear and stuffy. It can be like this book; Imaginative, investigatory, and insightful. For that historical context and what not, pair this with Mary Garrad's Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image Of The Female Hero In Italian Baroque Art

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vavinia

    Cercavo una biografia di Artemisia Gentileschi che mi permettesse di immergermi nella vita di questa grande pittrice. Ma il testo di Banti è molto lontano da qualsiasi comune biografia che ha meramente un fine di cronaca, di racconto di un vissuto. Artemisia di Anna Banti è una poesia in prosa. Non è di certo una lettura leggera o scorrevole ma è un vero e proprio gioiellino della letteratura italiana. Non conoscevo questa grande scrittrice e sono contenta di aver scovato questa personalità1

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mai Jimenez

    This was probably one of the most difficult reads I have ever made so I struggled a bit in the beginning. However, it was a beautiful book written in such a poetic way. I also think the story it tells is not only interesting but also very important and I think for those interested in art such as myself Artemisia's story is a great read. This was probably one of the most difficult reads I have ever made so I struggled a bit in the beginning. However, it was a beautiful book written in such a poetic way. I also think the story it tells is not only interesting but also very important and I think for those interested in art such as myself Artemisia's story is a great read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...