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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Famous Tales

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The header tale of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is the classic story which uses a strange case of intrigue and murder in nineteenth-century London, with a touch of the supernatural, to explore the nature of man's character. Also included in this edition are six other stories. "The Pavilion On The Links" An adventure story considered by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in The header tale of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is the classic story which uses a strange case of intrigue and murder in nineteenth-century London, with a touch of the supernatural, to explore the nature of man's character. Also included in this edition are six other stories. "The Pavilion On The Links" An adventure story considered by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1890 as 'the high-water mark of [Stevenson’s] genius' and 'the first short story in the world’. "A Lodging For The Night" On a bitterly cold winter’s night in 1456, Francis Villon, the greatest poet of medieval France, is huddled in a small house by a cemetery, trying to write “The Ballade of Roast Fish” while Guy Tabary slobbers over his shoulder, Regnier de Montigny and Thevenin Pensete play a game of chance, and the renegade monk Dom Nicolas watches. All of them are thieves, among whom there is no honor. "Markheim" A strange, supernatural story that opens in an antique store, with Markheim wishing to buy a Christmas present for a woman he will soon marry. The dealer presents him with a mirror but Markheim takes fright at his own reflection, claiming that no man wants to see what a mirror shows him. "The Sire de Malétroit's Door" Denis de Beaulieu, a young cavalier, is precocious in the arts of chivalry and war. Not yet twenty-two years old, he has already killed a man in battle and is confident as he goes about his affairs. One dark, unsettled September night in 1429, Denis finds himself alone in a territory jointly occupied by Burgundian and English troops. "The Beach of Falesá" Wiltshire welcomed his transfer to the trading station at Falesa after spending four years on a Pacific island where he had no white neighbors. Case and old Captain Randall lived in Falesa. Even though they operated a competing store, Wiltshire was grateful for their presence. At first, he was not disturbed by the fates of his two predecessors. "The Suicide Club" Three related stories make up the larger plot. They concern the work of Prince Florizel, and his assistant, Colonel Geraldine, in pursuing the president of the Suicide Club, an organization that provides desperate men with ways to escape unhappy or disastrous lives without the scandal of overt self-destruction.


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The header tale of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is the classic story which uses a strange case of intrigue and murder in nineteenth-century London, with a touch of the supernatural, to explore the nature of man's character. Also included in this edition are six other stories. "The Pavilion On The Links" An adventure story considered by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in The header tale of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is the classic story which uses a strange case of intrigue and murder in nineteenth-century London, with a touch of the supernatural, to explore the nature of man's character. Also included in this edition are six other stories. "The Pavilion On The Links" An adventure story considered by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1890 as 'the high-water mark of [Stevenson’s] genius' and 'the first short story in the world’. "A Lodging For The Night" On a bitterly cold winter’s night in 1456, Francis Villon, the greatest poet of medieval France, is huddled in a small house by a cemetery, trying to write “The Ballade of Roast Fish” while Guy Tabary slobbers over his shoulder, Regnier de Montigny and Thevenin Pensete play a game of chance, and the renegade monk Dom Nicolas watches. All of them are thieves, among whom there is no honor. "Markheim" A strange, supernatural story that opens in an antique store, with Markheim wishing to buy a Christmas present for a woman he will soon marry. The dealer presents him with a mirror but Markheim takes fright at his own reflection, claiming that no man wants to see what a mirror shows him. "The Sire de Malétroit's Door" Denis de Beaulieu, a young cavalier, is precocious in the arts of chivalry and war. Not yet twenty-two years old, he has already killed a man in battle and is confident as he goes about his affairs. One dark, unsettled September night in 1429, Denis finds himself alone in a territory jointly occupied by Burgundian and English troops. "The Beach of Falesá" Wiltshire welcomed his transfer to the trading station at Falesa after spending four years on a Pacific island where he had no white neighbors. Case and old Captain Randall lived in Falesa. Even though they operated a competing store, Wiltshire was grateful for their presence. At first, he was not disturbed by the fates of his two predecessors. "The Suicide Club" Three related stories make up the larger plot. They concern the work of Prince Florizel, and his assistant, Colonel Geraldine, in pursuing the president of the Suicide Club, an organization that provides desperate men with ways to escape unhappy or disastrous lives without the scandal of overt self-destruction.

21 review for The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Famous Tales

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon Bacon

    I have now read most of Robert Louis Stevenson's works. To me his books are mediocre, but his poetry is wonderful. My opinion on his short stories now is that they are very hit and miss. There were a few tales in this collection that I consider masterful ("A Lodging For the Night" and "Markheim" stand out to me); and then others that seem to have a great idea behind them, but Stevenson simply can't bring them to fruition ("The Suicide Club" and the infamous Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde spring to mind). I have now read most of Robert Louis Stevenson's works. To me his books are mediocre, but his poetry is wonderful. My opinion on his short stories now is that they are very hit and miss. There were a few tales in this collection that I consider masterful ("A Lodging For the Night" and "Markheim" stand out to me); and then others that seem to have a great idea behind them, but Stevenson simply can't bring them to fruition ("The Suicide Club" and the infamous Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde spring to mind). Regardless, this collection is a good survey of his short works and I would recommend it to those wishing to acquaint themselves with Stevenson. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to Cain's heresy," he used to say quaintly: "I let my brother go to the devil in his own way." In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last good influence in the lives of downgoing men. - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mary Keroson

    Enjoyed all the stories

  3. 4 out of 5

    Becky Marshall

  4. 4 out of 5

    Abbey

  5. 5 out of 5

    CiCi

  6. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Wills

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Long

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ania

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jodie Waller

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kazi

  13. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  14. 4 out of 5

    Seven Negen

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael Bonny

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maxfield Allison

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark Gaulton

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rob

  19. 4 out of 5

    DZMM

  20. 5 out of 5

    Keir Rice

  21. 5 out of 5

    Wallace

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