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Writings of Emma Goldman: Essays on Anarchism, Feminism, Socialism, and Communism

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A collection of essays by America's most prominent anarchist, feminist, and critic of both capitalism and communism, who was imprisoned and deported for opposing the First World War. Includes "Anarchy Defended by Anarchists," "The Tragedy of Women's Emancipation," "Anarchism: What It Really Stands For," "The Psychology of Political Violence," "Patriotism: A Menace to Liber A collection of essays by America's most prominent anarchist, feminist, and critic of both capitalism and communism, who was imprisoned and deported for opposing the First World War. Includes "Anarchy Defended by Anarchists," "The Tragedy of Women's Emancipation," "Anarchism: What It Really Stands For," "The Psychology of Political Violence," "Patriotism: A Menace to Liberty," "Speech Against Conscription And War," "There Is No Communism In Russia," and "The Individual, Society, And The State."


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A collection of essays by America's most prominent anarchist, feminist, and critic of both capitalism and communism, who was imprisoned and deported for opposing the First World War. Includes "Anarchy Defended by Anarchists," "The Tragedy of Women's Emancipation," "Anarchism: What It Really Stands For," "The Psychology of Political Violence," "Patriotism: A Menace to Liber A collection of essays by America's most prominent anarchist, feminist, and critic of both capitalism and communism, who was imprisoned and deported for opposing the First World War. Includes "Anarchy Defended by Anarchists," "The Tragedy of Women's Emancipation," "Anarchism: What It Really Stands For," "The Psychology of Political Violence," "Patriotism: A Menace to Liberty," "Speech Against Conscription And War," "There Is No Communism In Russia," and "The Individual, Society, And The State."

30 review for Writings of Emma Goldman: Essays on Anarchism, Feminism, Socialism, and Communism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mr_wormwood

    "Surely there is even greater reason for experiment in the social field than in the scientific". "Surely there is even greater reason for experiment in the social field than in the scientific".

  2. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    An incredibly interesting book about anarchism that not only rings true to this day, but also gives a unique insight into the time period it was written in. My issues with this book are that Goldman has a tendency to both generalize the public and act like she's better than everyone else for having these ideas. If you're able to enjoy a book about the political theory of anarchism despite its author being rude, then you will like this book. An incredibly interesting book about anarchism that not only rings true to this day, but also gives a unique insight into the time period it was written in. My issues with this book are that Goldman has a tendency to both generalize the public and act like she's better than everyone else for having these ideas. If you're able to enjoy a book about the political theory of anarchism despite its author being rude, then you will like this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Field

    What a big disappointment this was! I was very curious about Goldman’s experiences in the American labor movement, including the Haymarket strike. I wanted to hear her explain her thoughts on the use of violence to achieve revolution, and any comments she might have had on the Alexander Berkman affair. Her work as a nurse, her own tenure in prison, and her thoughts on the labor union and anarchist movements in Europe and Russia would also be interesting. But we got none of that. Instead,  "Anarc What a big disappointment this was! I was very curious about Goldman’s experiences in the American labor movement, including the Haymarket strike. I wanted to hear her explain her thoughts on the use of violence to achieve revolution, and any comments she might have had on the Alexander Berkman affair. Her work as a nurse, her own tenure in prison, and her thoughts on the labor union and anarchist movements in Europe and Russia would also be interesting. But we got none of that. Instead,  "Anarchism: What it Really Stands For" simply slams government and religion alike as ruinous, with few facts and little reasoning. “Patriotism: A Menace to Liberty” similarly espouses only one side of a complex issue, without doing either justice. "Minorities Versus Majorities” is a surprisingly reactionary attack on mediocrity (one is reminded of the joke about Eisenhower, who was supposedly surprised to learn that more than half the country is below average in intelligence). "The Psychology of Political Violence,” sounded promising at first, but in my view manages only to idolize the anarchist and demonize the liberal. Which, given which side I'm on, was unpersuasive to say the least. Similarly, “The Hypocrisy of Puritanism,” makes me want Goldman to please take a step back from myopic focus on what is wrong with society and appreciate the immense complexity of world history and the Western tradition. "Prisons: A Social Crime and Failure” makes points well taken, though not new to the 2021 reader. (And which, we might point out, have found their most workable solutions in liberal democracies like Germany.) "Francisco Ferrer and the Modern School” is a valuable mini-course on progressive education in its time, and probably worth a closer read to look up Ferrer and all the other things mentioned here. Later in the book, a whole series of writings rail against early feminism. Essays on "Women's Suffrage" , "Marriage and Love," and "The Tragedy of Woman's Emancipation" decry increased rights for women in bourgeois society as mere means of reproducing power structures. (I was reminded of the old radical queer arguments against LGBT marriage equality in the USA, and disagree, with respect, with both positions for similar reasons.) Perhaps Goldman should have been a literature teacher, or a theater director. "The Modern Drama: A Powerful Disseminator of Radical Thought," was just about the only essay I thoroughly enjoyed here. It's basically an annotated bibliography of plays that advance major social issues, many of which I had not heard of before but now plan to read, like The Weavers, Die Weber, by Gerhardt Hauptmann.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stella Crouch

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rhea

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dale

  8. 4 out of 5

    Red Kimmie

  9. 5 out of 5

    JellyInAJar

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dan Borkowski

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lilly

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ari

  14. 4 out of 5

    Blanca

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lloyd-Billington

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Timbs

  17. 4 out of 5

    Iris Jacobs

  18. 5 out of 5

    Leela Johanna

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matthew George Hall

  21. 4 out of 5

    Julian BLOWER

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tay

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ron

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marvin Kuzia

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Olivia (Livvy)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Riwa

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