website statistics The Fir Tree - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

The Fir Tree

Availability: Ready to download

The tale is about a fir tree so anxious to grow up, so anxious for greater things, that he cannot appreciate living in the moment. The tale was first published 21 December 1844 with "The Snow Queen" in Copenhagen, Denmark by C.A. Reitzel. One scholar indicates that "The Fir-Tree" was the first of Andersen's fairy tales to express a deep pessimism. The tale is about a fir tree so anxious to grow up, so anxious for greater things, that he cannot appreciate living in the moment. The tale was first published 21 December 1844 with "The Snow Queen" in Copenhagen, Denmark by C.A. Reitzel. One scholar indicates that "The Fir-Tree" was the first of Andersen's fairy tales to express a deep pessimism.


Compare

The tale is about a fir tree so anxious to grow up, so anxious for greater things, that he cannot appreciate living in the moment. The tale was first published 21 December 1844 with "The Snow Queen" in Copenhagen, Denmark by C.A. Reitzel. One scholar indicates that "The Fir-Tree" was the first of Andersen's fairy tales to express a deep pessimism. The tale is about a fir tree so anxious to grow up, so anxious for greater things, that he cannot appreciate living in the moment. The tale was first published 21 December 1844 with "The Snow Queen" in Copenhagen, Denmark by C.A. Reitzel. One scholar indicates that "The Fir-Tree" was the first of Andersen's fairy tales to express a deep pessimism.

30 review for The Fir Tree

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    I think I am going to have to stop reading anything by Hans Christian Andersen, and go on to something more light-hearted and optimistic, such as Russian literature perhaps (insert icon for irony here). But here goes ... The Fir Tree is a fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen, published in 1844, at the same time as his other deeply pessimistic tale "The Snow Queen" link here for my review. And now I find I can't bear to relive this story in much detail, in order to review it properly. But I'll I think I am going to have to stop reading anything by Hans Christian Andersen, and go on to something more light-hearted and optimistic, such as Russian literature perhaps (insert icon for irony here). But here goes ... The Fir Tree is a fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen, published in 1844, at the same time as his other deeply pessimistic tale "The Snow Queen" link here for my review. And now I find I can't bear to relive this story in much detail, in order to review it properly. But I'll attempt to give a summary here, and then comment. The Fir Tree starts with a bubbly enthusisatic young pine tree, full of life and vigour, stretching his branches up to see the whole world. He wants to see everything, and just can't wait to grow bigger. Lots of other creatures and people come into the forest, and admire him, but still he looks forward to what will happen when he grows tall and strong. He excitedly chats to everybody in the forest about his future. (view spoiler)[Then he is selected as the finest, strongest pine tree, and the first to be chosen and felled. "The axe cut deep into its pith, and the tree fell to earth with a sigh. It felt faint with pain and quite forgot to be happy. It just felt sad at leaving its home where its roots were. Never again would it see its friends - the bushes and flowers - perhaps not even the birds. There was no joy in such a parting." When the pine tree comes back to himself, he is being sold as a Christmas tree. And in the house, he hears all the people saying, "Just wait for tonight ... Tonight it will really sparkle". And the pine tree gets a "barkache" from sheer longing and wishes it were already the evening. He loves being covered in candles, toys, tinsel and fruit, but is a bit frightened by all the screaming and shouting, and even more so when some flames singe his needles. He listens to a story which makes him think of the world outside. I'll do it all better next time, he thinks, and starts to look forward to the next day when it will all happen all over again, and he will enjoy it more. But of course it doesn't. The story goes from bad to worse. The next day the pine tree is tossed into the attic, where he only has mice for company. He gets more and more lonely and jaded. He feels very regretful and sorry for himself, as over time his foliage gradually withers and his branches break off. He yearns for the forest, and wonders when he will be taken back there. Eventually, when he is almost unrecognisable, he is taken back outside. He loves to experience the sights and smells of nature he remembers so well. Finally my life is beginning again, he thinks, "'This is the life!' The tree shouted for joy and tried to stretch out its branches. But all its needles were withered and yellow." The only mark of his former glory is the gold tinsel star which glitters in the sunshine. Some children spot the golden star on the "horrid old Christmas tree" and tear it off, and have fun stamping on the tree's branches until they snap. Then a servant comes and chops up the tree for firewood. "It's all over, all over!' said the poor tree. 'I should have have enjoyed myself while I had the chance ... It's all over, over and done with.'" And the tree is thrown on the fire, "As it sighed and groaned, the tree thought of a summer's day in the forest, and a winter's night when the stars are shining. It thought of Christmas Eve and Klumpy-Dumpy, the only story it had ever heard or knew how to tell - and so the tree was burned to ash." "It was all over with the tree and the story too. All stories must come to an end." (hide spoiler)] But what a story. The message is perfectly clear ... I just don't like it. This is my least favourite of all the many stories I know by Hans Christian Andersen. It is sometimes paired as a companion tale with "The Snowman", (link here for my review) a story which I find more successful. I am not suggesting sanitising fairy tales for children. There have probably been far too many hatchet jobs of that type already (if you will excuse the pun). However, some are weaker tales to start with. "The Snowman" has a similarly downbeat message, but is poignant rather than so unremittingly dour. Yes, there is one positive message in The Fir Tree. It is to live in the moment and appreciate what you already have. But I would never read this story to children. It teaches them not be optimistic, not to ever look forward to anything. It teaches that the world is always cruel, that there is no point in trying to do anything or be anything. That ultimately there is no hope. One critic has said, "a new note was struck with "The Fir-Tree"—a note of deeply ingrained pessimism, suggesting not only the mercilessness of fate but the pointlessness of life itself, that only the moment is worthwhile. For the first time in his fairy tales, Andersen expressed an existential doubt that his religious beliefs could not allay." Hans Christian Andersen's biographer suggested that the fir tree, like his creator, is "a fantasist, vain, fearful, restless, afflicted with the trembling sensitivity of the neurotic, manically swinging from hope to misery." Perhaps this story was written, then, as a catharsis; purely an expression of the author's thoughts. But we know that he promoted the tale by reading it aloud at social gatherings. And since Hans Christian Andersen was a well-known figure, telling stories to children and writing specifically for them, this one has to be seen in that light. So, shame on you Mr Andersen! Is this a story to present to impressionable young minds? You have successfully managed to make me empathise with the fir tree. I feel his pain and desolation completely. Well done for making me believe for a while that there is no joy in living. I would give you an extra star for your expertise at this - but you have made me feel too apathetic and despondent to care or bother. For a far better feel-good fantasy tale with a traditional feel, about a fir tree, I would suggest "The Good Little Christmas Tree" by Ursula Moray Williams. Link here for my review. As for The Fir Tree ... well unless very young children are made of sterner stuff than I am, I just wouldn't go there.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    I like to read lots of Christmas-y things during the Advent so I perused the internet to find „new“ things and discovered this special edition of Hans Christian Andersen’s tale. The tale itself, which I had known already but still enjoyed greatly this time around, centers around the titular tree who is so anxious to grow up, so anxious for greater things (like ending up as the mast of a great ship), that he cannot appreciate living in the moment and when he finally is used for „something great“, I like to read lots of Christmas-y things during the Advent so I perused the internet to find „new“ things and discovered this special edition of Hans Christian Andersen’s tale. The tale itself, which I had known already but still enjoyed greatly this time around, centers around the titular tree who is so anxious to grow up, so anxious for greater things (like ending up as the mast of a great ship), that he cannot appreciate living in the moment and when he finally is used for „something great“, it is short-lived (yes, the tale ends sadly). What makes this edition so special are Sanna Annukka’s illustrations: While the art style is very … modern … I found I enjoyed a fresh look and, strangely, it still fit nicely with the tale itself and invoked the right kind of atmosphere. Apparently, the illustrator has worked on at least three classic Christmas-y fairy tales in this very unique style - you’ll see another one reviewed today, here in fact, and the third one that I know of I'll read next December. ;) A sad but very important/poignant tale that deserved a make-over.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ines

    Sorry, but this story is terrible😐, poor tree!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Candace Robinson

    First, the edition that I received has a spectacular cover! I have never read anything by Hans Cristian Andersen! I loved the illustrations, and wow the story itself was a depressing one. It had me feeling pretty sorry for the tree! Full review on my blog https://literarydust.wordpress.com/20... First, the edition that I received has a spectacular cover! I have never read anything by Hans Cristian Andersen! I loved the illustrations, and wow the story itself was a depressing one. It had me feeling pretty sorry for the tree! Full review on my blog https://literarydust.wordpress.com/20...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    What a great reminder to appreciate and enjoy each stage of life! This is a short story & a must read!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Annamaria

    Lovely read about our need to be able to appreciate things as long as we have them. Also very, very sad. Plus, the cover for this edition is stunning!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Out in the woods amongst his many large companions, a little fir tree is keen to grow up. Listen here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/... 2* A Country Christmas 3* A Killer's Christmas in Wales 5* A Child's Christmas in Wales (re-visit for nth time) 3* The Fir Tree Out in the woods amongst his many large companions, a little fir tree is keen to grow up. Listen here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/... 2* A Country Christmas 3* A Killer's Christmas in Wales 5* A Child's Christmas in Wales (re-visit for nth time) 3* The Fir Tree

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lara Maynard

    "Out in the forest stood a pretty little fir tree." This story is more disconcerting that cozy, so if you're looking for a sweet Christmas tale, then don't look to The Fire Tree. It was one of my favourite Christmas reads this holiday season, and one that I'd pick up again. I found this vintage 1970s Harper & Row edition at a local library and enjoyed the book design and illustrations, along with the story first published in the 1840s. "Out in the forest stood a pretty little fir tree." This story is more disconcerting that cozy, so if you're looking for a sweet Christmas tale, then don't look to The Fire Tree. It was one of my favourite Christmas reads this holiday season, and one that I'd pick up again. I found this vintage 1970s Harper & Row edition at a local library and enjoyed the book design and illustrations, along with the story first published in the 1840s.

  9. 5 out of 5

    SwedishGeekGirl

    Sad but still a beautiful little tale fitting for the winter times. The fir tree by Hans Christian Andersen get a 8/10 stars.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Fern Adams

    This is the sort of story that while read often to children, I feel you get more out of as an adult. A little fir tree full of hope and optimism leaves its forest and becomes a Christmas tree- but what happens once Christmas is over? There are a number of messages in this; don’t take anything for granted, learn to appreciate each stage of life you are in and quite possibly don’t have a real tree for Christmas!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Coller

    Besides Wuthering Heights, this has to be the absolute most depressing book I've ever read. As soon as I realized where this story was going, my heart began to beat faster with dread and fear. Warning: it ends badly. I hope someone else can find some redemption in this pitiful tale. As for me and my house, we shall purge the book. Besides Wuthering Heights, this has to be the absolute most depressing book I've ever read. As soon as I realized where this story was going, my heart began to beat faster with dread and fear. Warning: it ends badly. I hope someone else can find some redemption in this pitiful tale. As for me and my house, we shall purge the book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    From BBC Radio 4 Extra: Out in the woods amongst his many large companions, a nice little fir tree is keen to grow up. Read by Paul Copley.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pratyasha

    A beautiful (a bit gloomy) story that gives a moral that we hear almost every day, but mostly don't give much thought to. Stop for a moment and enjoy the rustling sound of tree leaves or the sound of the rain, the sight of the plain blue sky or that of dark grey clouds above your head. Be grateful for what you have at this moment because you never know if the future will be better or worse. Having high expectations of what the future holds for you might only upset you eventually. I need to start A beautiful (a bit gloomy) story that gives a moral that we hear almost every day, but mostly don't give much thought to. Stop for a moment and enjoy the rustling sound of tree leaves or the sound of the rain, the sight of the plain blue sky or that of dark grey clouds above your head. Be grateful for what you have at this moment because you never know if the future will be better or worse. Having high expectations of what the future holds for you might only upset you eventually. I need to start reading more of H.C. Andersen. Strangely, I sympathised with the trees to a high extent. I wish humans bought Christmas trees that could be planted again later; the end of the story literally broke my heart.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dela Knight

    Original Review on: http://pastriesandnovelthoughts.weebl... So, let's start with the outside of this book-it is stunning. The book itself, The Fir Tree, is a lesson on appreciation. Appreciation of what we have, who we are and the things we are surrounded with. It's a beautifully sad story but an important one. In this book we learn to enjoy life and the little things in it. You learn to understand that taking your days for granted can make life pass you by without you even noticing. Even though Original Review on: http://pastriesandnovelthoughts.weebl... So, let's start with the outside of this book-it is stunning. The book itself, The Fir Tree, is a lesson on appreciation. Appreciation of what we have, who we are and the things we are surrounded with. It's a beautifully sad story but an important one. In this book we learn to enjoy life and the little things in it. You learn to understand that taking your days for granted can make life pass you by without you even noticing. Even though the story is one that is sad, I think Sanna Annukka brought this book to life with her art. The colors in this book are vibrant, the pictures abstract and the overall feel Annukka gave this book was gorgeous. I think her illustrations are important to the novel because they help to form the words into something more than they are. The pictures help to show you the beautiful things that the Fir Tree was surrounded by but couldn't see because it was blind-blind to the fact it had an endless beauty surrounding it. The Fir Tree teaches us that life shouldn't be spent being jealous of other people or completely oblivious to what we have and should be grateful for. It teaches us to enjoy life for what it is. This story is important because now in days people feel entitled to everything they want and never stop to think about how appreciative they should be for the people and things they already have. ​​ This story has a great message that is still very relevant. Never having read a Hans Christian Andersen novel before, I am very happy for this to have been the first. I recommend people read this book so that they can reevaluate how they think and look at life and the things in it. My hats off to Sanna Annukka. You made this book all the more gorgeous. P.s. this book would make a fantastic Christmas present haha. I received a free copy of the novel from the publishing company, through ​bloggingforbooks.com, in exchange for a honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine from How Useful It Is

    About: The Fir Tree is a fiction picture children’s book written by Hans Christian Andersen, translated by Tiina Nunnally, and illustrated by Sanna Annukka. This book is the First American Edition, published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Crown Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House in 2004, hardcover, 42 pages. This title was originally published in 10/28/1970 titled Grantraeet. Summary from the book: A little fir tree realizes too late that it did not appreciate the grand momen About: The Fir Tree is a fiction picture children’s book written by Hans Christian Andersen, translated by Tiina Nunnally, and illustrated by Sanna Annukka. This book is the First American Edition, published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Crown Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House in 2004, hardcover, 42 pages. This title was originally published in 10/28/1970 titled Grantraeet. Summary from the book: A little fir tree realizes too late that it did not appreciate the grand moments of life, such as being a Christmas tree, while they were happening. My Experience: I started reading The Fir Tree for my 5-year-old son on 11/15/16 and finished it on 11/20/16. This book sends a good message to all readers that we should cherish and live each day as if it’s our last day on earth. What the little fir tree did in this book was only looking forward to what will happen next that he did not pay attention to what is currently happening. When he looks back, he realizes that life was actually great. Readers follow the point of view of the little fir tree, from beginning until the end of its life journey. This book is great for teens and adult readers because of the meaning on life. It’s not a positive read for kids because of it not loving itself for being small, of it being locked up in the attic in the dark with only mice as friends, of it being stepped on by kids, and of being burned alive. “Take pleasure in us!” said the air and the sunlight. “Take pleasure in your fresh youth out in the open!” p.14 Pro: each day to live life to the fullest Con: self-conscious, looking forward for something better, not accepting for what is in front, no family or friends I rate it 4 stars! ***Disclaimer: I received this book via BloggingforBooks.com and my opinions are honest. Many thanks to the author & publisher for the opportunity to read and review. xoxo, Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com

  16. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    The Fir Tree, illustrated by Bernadette Watts. Bernadette Watts - who has also illustrated Hans Christian Andersen's The Ugly Duckling and The Snow Queen - turns her attention to his melancholy arboreal "biography" in this lovely picture-book. Never content with his present lot, always looking ahead and wanting more, the titular fir tree is unable to appreciate the true meaning of the events of his life, from being made into a Christmas decoration, to being stored in the attic. After finding Watts The Fir Tree, illustrated by Bernadette Watts. Bernadette Watts - who has also illustrated Hans Christian Andersen's The Ugly Duckling and The Snow Queen - turns her attention to his melancholy arboreal "biography" in this lovely picture-book. Never content with his present lot, always looking ahead and wanting more, the titular fir tree is unable to appreciate the true meaning of the events of his life, from being made into a Christmas decoration, to being stored in the attic. After finding Watts' interpretation of The Snow Queen rather lackluster, I wasn't sure I would care for her rendition of The Fir Tree. I am happy to report, however, that I really enjoyed her illustrations here, finding them quite well-suited to the tale. From the exuberant hare jumping over the tiny snow-bound fir, to the bedraggled, dried-out tree stacked in the corner of an attic, Watts' pictures capture the emotions of the tale: its sense of beauty, sadness, and most of all, regret. I'm glad I gave her work a second chance, and am even wondering if I was too hard on her efforts for The Snow Queen: it's possible her edition simply suffered in comparison to the Vladyslav Yerko edition...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    The Fir Tree, illustrated by Nancy Ekholm Burkert. Originally published in 1844, as part of Hans Christian Andersen's New Fairy Tales, The Fir Tree - like The Little Mermaid and The Snow Queen - is one of the author's original creations. The story of a young tree who is unable to appreciate present blessings, because he is always looking forward to future glories, it displays that unmistakable melancholy found in so many of Andersen's creations, and concludes with the little fir's sad dem The Fir Tree, illustrated by Nancy Ekholm Burkert. Originally published in 1844, as part of Hans Christian Andersen's New Fairy Tales, The Fir Tree - like The Little Mermaid and The Snow Queen - is one of the author's original creations. The story of a young tree who is unable to appreciate present blessings, because he is always looking forward to future glories, it displays that unmistakable melancholy found in so many of Andersen's creations, and concludes with the little fir's sad demise. Nancy Ekholm Burkert's gorgeous full-color brush and ink paintings, and black and white drawings in pencil, add to the emotional weight of this retelling, emphasizing the beauty of the forest, the magic of Christmas night, and the loneliness of the tree's final days. Visually appealing, this is one I would recommend to all Hans Christian Andersen readers...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bice

    A lovely short tale... glad I read it in audio.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    First and foremost, the story itself isn't anything particularly grand. It has a moral and I can view how, at the time of it being written, it was a wonderful and perhaps innovative. There's an imagination here that you don't always get in stories (even those that are deemed successful or popular). Having said that, there's really nothing splendid about the story and any kind of magic that one may expect from a Christmas story just seeps away after the first few words. However, I will include pr First and foremost, the story itself isn't anything particularly grand. It has a moral and I can view how, at the time of it being written, it was a wonderful and perhaps innovative. There's an imagination here that you don't always get in stories (even those that are deemed successful or popular). Having said that, there's really nothing splendid about the story and any kind of magic that one may expect from a Christmas story just seeps away after the first few words. However, I will include praise for the beautiful geometric illustrations that adorned my personal copy of this book. They capture the essence of the story in a very unique way and give you a glimpse at what the story is trying to do (but failing). Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest | Shop | Etsy

  20. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    i love the moral lesson of it. it is ,maybe, very sad to many, but isnt it just life telling us to never rush things and appreciate every minute we have? if i were to tell it to a child i think i will choose a perfect timing to it.....it maybe too depressed for his/her personality.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lesle

    The Fir Tree is about a tree that starts out as a little sprout. All the action that takes place around him he thinks he wants to grow up and leave the forest like all the other trees. When finally he is chosen and his limbs stay intact, he is so excited about being a loved and decorated tree with a gold gilded star made of paper is placed at the top. The servants carry him up to the attic to be left, but in the end the Tree dries up, is sawed into pieces and is set on fire. Sad little Fir Tree :(

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy

    Moving fable by Hans Christian Andersen which illustrates the old adage, "be careful what you wish for…" Reading it in the 21st century, it takes on ecological and environmental themes as well. Thanks, NetGalley, for introducing me to Sanna Annukka's stunning artwork! This one will also make its way to both my personal and classroom libraries. Moving fable by Hans Christian Andersen which illustrates the old adage, "be careful what you wish for…" Reading it in the 21st century, it takes on ecological and environmental themes as well. Thanks, NetGalley, for introducing me to Sanna Annukka's stunning artwork! This one will also make its way to both my personal and classroom libraries.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mira | I Read Like Phoebe Runs

    Always loved Andersen's tales, and the illustrations by Sanna Annukka make this edition so freaking gorgeous! Always loved Andersen's tales, and the illustrations by Sanna Annukka make this edition so freaking gorgeous!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anna of Mleczna River

    How I'd summarize this short story is to seize the day! Live in the moment. It's a sad story (mind for kids!) about a fir tree that wants to grow taller and older to achieve great things. The young fir tree lives in the future - thinks that his happinness is to come with age. However, little does he know that with growing older,come different responsibilities and danger, in his case, being chopped down and taken to a mansion to dress as a chiristams tree. He enjoys being dressed up in sweets and How I'd summarize this short story is to seize the day! Live in the moment. It's a sad story (mind for kids!) about a fir tree that wants to grow taller and older to achieve great things. The young fir tree lives in the future - thinks that his happinness is to come with age. However, little does he know that with growing older,come different responsibilities and danger, in his case, being chopped down and taken to a mansion to dress as a chiristams tree. He enjoys being dressed up in sweets and decoration, but he learns soon that his joy is short-lived as his destiny is to be eventually chopped down into logs after the christmas celebrations. it's a sad story with a powerful conclusion: you gotta be happy with now and not be too much about how wonderful your life will be in 2-5 years. Beautiful yet challenging thought :)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I cannot rate this tale because I am torn between giving it five stars for being such a meaningful, emotional little story, and one star because it breaks my heart everytime. The Fir Tree, The Little Matchgirl and Snow White are the stories that haunted me to the point of melancholy and nightmares as a young child, but I actually quite forgot The Fir Tree until a couple of years ago when by chance I read it to my daughter. Each sentence I read aloud came with a deep sense of foreboding. We got t I cannot rate this tale because I am torn between giving it five stars for being such a meaningful, emotional little story, and one star because it breaks my heart everytime. The Fir Tree, The Little Matchgirl and Snow White are the stories that haunted me to the point of melancholy and nightmares as a young child, but I actually quite forgot The Fir Tree until a couple of years ago when by chance I read it to my daughter. Each sentence I read aloud came with a deep sense of foreboding. We got to the end, exchanged pained looks, and she exclaimed, "That was really sad!" I suspect this story may be behind my dislike of real christmas trees and I think it made my daughter (who rates it 5 stars by the way) glad we have never had one. Yes, I understand it's allegory but still ...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This is why I don’t do “live” trees for Christmas. I pull the same little fakeness out of its box, plug it in, and feel no remorse! A little fir tree is growing up in a forest, observing and aspiring. Envious of the bigger trees, wanting more. Curious as to where some go when taken away. One holiday, he is big enough to be a family Christmas tree. Off he goes and enjoys the bedazzled night of adoration. But soon enough, he is stowed away until spring where he is taken back outside, and... well, i This is why I don’t do “live” trees for Christmas. I pull the same little fakeness out of its box, plug it in, and feel no remorse! A little fir tree is growing up in a forest, observing and aspiring. Envious of the bigger trees, wanting more. Curious as to where some go when taken away. One holiday, he is big enough to be a family Christmas tree. Off he goes and enjoys the bedazzled night of adoration. But soon enough, he is stowed away until spring where he is taken back outside, and... well, it’s horrible! The edition I read is beautifully illustrated by Sanna Annukka and has a lovely cloth cover via Ten Speed Press.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephan

    One of Andersen's best stories I really loved the message It is so much true and relevant for people who wish to achieve something in life. It was a Carpe Diem message, enjoy life, live the moment I also enjoy the melancholic style Andersen used. Brilliant Story. One of Andersen's best stories I really loved the message It is so much true and relevant for people who wish to achieve something in life. It was a Carpe Diem message, enjoy life, live the moment I also enjoy the melancholic style Andersen used. Brilliant Story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    “Oh, had I but enjoyed myself while I could have done so!” A well done tale about why you should take the time to live in the moment, rather than looking to bigger and better things at the expense of what you already have. Short but sweet, with a good takeaway message. 3.5 / 5

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tarissa

    I thought this would be a cute little story -- but it turned out to be exceptionally sad. Oh dear! Still is a good story for its literary merit. I listened to the audio version narrated by David Tennant, which is done very well.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Leaflet

    The story's a downer but the illustrations are wonderful. The story's a downer but the illustrations are wonderful.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.