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The bold voice behind the popular Man Repeller blog shares humorous and deeply personal essays demonstrating that what we choose to wear may hold our dearest memories. Engage using #manrepeller. Silk parachute pants. A gold lamé jumpsuit. Ankle boots with fringe. Were these fashion-forward items sending men running in the opposite direction? Maybe, but Leandra Medine never c The bold voice behind the popular Man Repeller blog shares humorous and deeply personal essays demonstrating that what we choose to wear may hold our dearest memories. Engage using #manrepeller. Silk parachute pants. A gold lamé jumpsuit. Ankle boots with fringe. Were these fashion-forward items sending men running in the opposite direction? Maybe, but Leandra Medine never cared. Slipping into drop-crotch shorts and a boxed sequin blazer in the dressing room of Topshop in downtown Manhattan, a brokenhearted Leandra had an epiphany. Looking in the mirror, she suddenly realized she didn't have a boyfriend because of the way she dressed. And the more she thought about it, the more she realized that such outfits said a lot about her life-romantic and otherwise. Now, in her first book, the acclaimed blogger and fashion darling recounts her most significant memories through the lens of her sartorial choices. With her signature sass, blunt honesty, and some personal photos, Leandra shares details of the night she lost her virginity right down to the pair of white tube socks she forgot to take off, as well as when and why she realized her grandma's vintage Hermès ostrich skin clutch could hold much more than just keys and a cell phone. Through it all, she proves you don't need to compromise even your most repellent qualities to find your way into that big white dress (and an organza moto jacket). See? You can have your yeti and wear it, too. Showcasing the singular voice that has won Leandra millions of fans, this book is a collection of awkwardly funny experiences, a sweet love story, and above all, a reminder to celebrate and embrace a world made for women, by women.


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The bold voice behind the popular Man Repeller blog shares humorous and deeply personal essays demonstrating that what we choose to wear may hold our dearest memories. Engage using #manrepeller. Silk parachute pants. A gold lamé jumpsuit. Ankle boots with fringe. Were these fashion-forward items sending men running in the opposite direction? Maybe, but Leandra Medine never c The bold voice behind the popular Man Repeller blog shares humorous and deeply personal essays demonstrating that what we choose to wear may hold our dearest memories. Engage using #manrepeller. Silk parachute pants. A gold lamé jumpsuit. Ankle boots with fringe. Were these fashion-forward items sending men running in the opposite direction? Maybe, but Leandra Medine never cared. Slipping into drop-crotch shorts and a boxed sequin blazer in the dressing room of Topshop in downtown Manhattan, a brokenhearted Leandra had an epiphany. Looking in the mirror, she suddenly realized she didn't have a boyfriend because of the way she dressed. And the more she thought about it, the more she realized that such outfits said a lot about her life-romantic and otherwise. Now, in her first book, the acclaimed blogger and fashion darling recounts her most significant memories through the lens of her sartorial choices. With her signature sass, blunt honesty, and some personal photos, Leandra shares details of the night she lost her virginity right down to the pair of white tube socks she forgot to take off, as well as when and why she realized her grandma's vintage Hermès ostrich skin clutch could hold much more than just keys and a cell phone. Through it all, she proves you don't need to compromise even your most repellent qualities to find your way into that big white dress (and an organza moto jacket). See? You can have your yeti and wear it, too. Showcasing the singular voice that has won Leandra millions of fans, this book is a collection of awkwardly funny experiences, a sweet love story, and above all, a reminder to celebrate and embrace a world made for women, by women.

30 review for Man Repeller: Seeking Love. Finding Overalls.

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Not really sure what I think of this book. I’m not a regular reader of Medine’s blog; I tried it but found her fashion sense to be not my taste. My feelings towards the beginning of this book were of amusement in the stories of her stubborn childhood, and then as the book progressed I started to feel a little bit admiring of her “Eff you, I wear what I want!” attitude. Then my annoyance set in. This woman is young. She has lived on the Upper East side of Manhattan her whole life (except for coll Not really sure what I think of this book. I’m not a regular reader of Medine’s blog; I tried it but found her fashion sense to be not my taste. My feelings towards the beginning of this book were of amusement in the stories of her stubborn childhood, and then as the book progressed I started to feel a little bit admiring of her “Eff you, I wear what I want!” attitude. Then my annoyance set in. This woman is young. She has lived on the Upper East side of Manhattan her whole life (except for college when she was in downtown Manhattan). She constantly embarks on extremely glamorous, international family vacations, usually with lots of family and friends along. She regularly inherits couture from her relatives (or has them buy her $300 shoes at a ridiculously young age), and seems to have a shopping addiction at Zara and Forever 21 that borders on pathetic. It was slightly interesting to read about how she has no interest in investment pieces that will last forever- she loves trends too much- but this nonconventional attitude just came across as wasteful, especially coming from someone at her level of wealth. Other things of note: She had a brief weight problem, which was quickly solved and every subsequent photo of her in the book makes her look extremely thin in a socialite-with-anorexia kind of way; not really sure what I was supposed to take away from that. She writes in great detail about things like period accidents, and losing her virginity, and I feel like they were just for shock value. She mentions her “allowance” several times and the ridiculous things she spends it on; I guess I just don’t have patience or interest for that kind of thing. The whole second half of the book seems to portray someone who fell into her chosen career (even though she spends most of her days watching TV in bed), and agonizes over whether or not she should go through with her wedding. The best thing about this book is that the author advocates having confidence in yourself. She illustrates time after time that this confidence is extremely valuable and worth cultivating (and, incidentally, attractive to the opposite sex). Medine often chooses clothes that other people don’t like, but as long as she thinks she looks cool she’s happy. This is a good thing, even if she doesn’t necessarily illustrate the same confidence in her romantic relationships. In some chapters, she comes across as fairly smart and self-aware, but I couldn’t escape the nagging feeling that she’s still a sheltered, extremely privileged girl in her early 20s who lived with her parents until moving in with her banker husband. That doesn’t exactly make a great memoir, in my opinion.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andee Marley

    Leandra is a privileged upper east-sider who has never had to look farther than Neiman Marcus for a KOOKY OUTFIT!! oh my god, she's so kooky! UGh, I finished this book out of boredom. Leandra is a privileged upper east-sider who has never had to look farther than Neiman Marcus for a KOOKY OUTFIT!! oh my god, she's so kooky! UGh, I finished this book out of boredom.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    She's a fashion blogger who reads DFW, so I was looking forward to this. However the qualities that made her blog such a success, a forget-you aesthetic attitude, blunt humor, and a willingness to humiliate herself, is what made this book so unbearable. She managed to make extremely personal stories overly sappy. She fancies herself an independent spirit but she doesn't recognize her own entitlement. Also she was fat-shamed by her older brother as a kid. Not cool, Haim. She's a fashion blogger who reads DFW, so I was looking forward to this. However the qualities that made her blog such a success, a forget-you aesthetic attitude, blunt humor, and a willingness to humiliate herself, is what made this book so unbearable. She managed to make extremely personal stories overly sappy. She fancies herself an independent spirit but she doesn't recognize her own entitlement. Also she was fat-shamed by her older brother as a kid. Not cool, Haim.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Not every blog needs to be a book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    This book should be called "Upper Class Non-Problems." I'm sure I'd get more out of it if I knew who this person was or anything about her. Who the fuck actually calls it Aunt Flow? This book should be called "Upper Class Non-Problems." I'm sure I'd get more out of it if I knew who this person was or anything about her. Who the fuck actually calls it Aunt Flow?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    How I Came To Read This Book: I got a review copy from the publisher. I picked it because I liked the idea of a nonfiction fashion memoir from a young & buzzy writer – great pick for your sartorial-addicted best friend. The Plot: Truth be told I wasn’t really familiar with Leandra Medine or her blog, Man Repeller, prior to reading this book. I only obliquely knew who she was through an appearance on Project Runway / checking out her blog once shortly after that. But as it turns out, based on the How I Came To Read This Book: I got a review copy from the publisher. I picked it because I liked the idea of a nonfiction fashion memoir from a young & buzzy writer – great pick for your sartorial-addicted best friend. The Plot: Truth be told I wasn’t really familiar with Leandra Medine or her blog, Man Repeller, prior to reading this book. I only obliquely knew who she was through an appearance on Project Runway / checking out her blog once shortly after that. But as it turns out, based on the fact she WAS on PR and has a book, she’s obviously ‘kind of a big deal.’ The gist of the book takes pieces from Leandra’s wardrobe – from her childhood to adulthood – and ties them into specific personal and sartorial memories, many of which are cringe-worthy but humanizing. The essays are very chronological and while they often spend the first half delving deep into a fashion moment, by the second half of each essay we are propelled into a dissection of Leandra’s friends, family and love life. The Good & The Bad: Another book I struggle with rating. I feel like if I was already a diehard Man Repeller fan I would have been a lot more involved and interested. As it was, I polished off the book in pretty short order – in part because it’s fluffy, but also because it is pretty digestible, fun, and thoughtful. I was a little frustrated that each essay meandered so far from the source topic – to the point where I kept on flipping to the front of the chapter to remind myself what we were discussing – but she ultimately (usually) brought the topic back by the end of the essay. Beyond that, I liked that the story was chronological, and the essays were ultimately linked, tying in repeated elements that made for an almost novel-like read. While I was pleasantly amused for the first three quarters of the book, I didn’t entirely know where the story was going until we got to the Canadian Tuxedo chapter, which highlights how Man Repeller came to be – the idea being that Leandra’s love for fashion (and off-kilter sense of style) was ultimately conflicting with her love life and ability to ‘attract a man’. From there, the book takes a sort of serious turn. In general, I was surprised how much the book focused – quite candidly – on her love life. I thought she was kind of psychotic for spending so much time focused on her ex Abie, although by the end of the story, it all made sense (spoiler alert: they get married). While I personally quite enjoyed the Hermes clutch story, I thought the final chapters were some of the most insightful, as Leandra explores what marriage means to a young, modern woman that also holds traditional Jewish beliefs quite dearly. The chapter she wrote where she reveals what it was like to reveal her big engagement was also interesting – although rang a little false or irritated at the same time. There’s no problem with that though. As Leandra points out in a memorable passage, the internet is a voyeuristic place, and giving people some insight to your life can make you a star – while I get she was sorta apologetic about the engagement running converse to her blog’s ‘fashion over dudes’ persona, I actually kind of appreciated that I personally felt like I could see through it and that she really (understandably) feels like it ain’t no thang to get all worked up about. So while there were a lot of enjoyable things to the book, as someone that doesn’t regularly read Man Repeller, I have to say there were some other things I didn’t like. Leandra strikes me as sort of a fashion blogger version of Lena Dunham; someone that grew up in a rather privileged, wealthy home and was able to use that as a springboard to make waves in the fashion industry. She honestly seems to take for granted how lucky she is (particularly in her flippant breakdown of her wedding in the final chapter). Not too many people get hand-me-down Chanel, or interview for a Valentino internship at eighteen, nor do they have Rebecca Minkoff custom-designing a leather moto jacket for a grand New York wedding. It seriously made my eyes roll that she was so glib about her wedding yet bought a friggin’ Marchesa gown. I mean really? I definitely don’t want to discredit her as I respect she made a name for herself in the industry with nary a fashion design credit to her name – but something about her persona just felt entitled and pretentious, and the anecdotes bordered this strange line between being really showy (some of the hipper-than-thou writing was a little icky, although in line with her blog’s voice) and really humanizing. I’m not sure where I land on it. Do I think Leandra is the most relatable person on the planet? No, not by a mile. She is not the free spirited girl she likes to paint herself as - not with the upper crusty background and support network she's got. But I’d hesitate to call her a snob either: it takes quite a woman to speak about three deadly period experiences to the intimate degree she does here. And yet...I wonder. Why write the book at all, aside from money to buy more fabulous clothes? To present yourself as an everygirl? To give fans some bonus content? To justify your marriage? It’s a weird thing to be an outsider reading this book, and I wonder whether this is what Man Repeller fans will really be looking for. I liked the book, but I’m not so sure about what Leandra was trying to accomplish for herself. The Bottom Line: Witty and fluffy, yet grounded with some genuine (at times pretentious) insights, the book charms more than the author. Anything Memorable?: Truthfully, this book made me want to go shopping. Or at the very least, play around in my wardrobe a bit more. I have a new obsession with purchasing some booties. 60-Book Challenge?: Book #53 in 2013

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    Damn it, Leandra. You've grown on me like harem pants. I expected to hate this collection of essays--what could be dumber than a memoir by a 23-year-old? Who can afford $1,500 shoes? But she won me over. Her memories focus on what she was wearing at the time, but go on from there to show you something sad and funny that seems horribly familiar. Thank God she had a good editor, though. I've stopped reading her blog because she uses SAT words (usually not in the normal way...I need her to explain w Damn it, Leandra. You've grown on me like harem pants. I expected to hate this collection of essays--what could be dumber than a memoir by a 23-year-old? Who can afford $1,500 shoes? But she won me over. Her memories focus on what she was wearing at the time, but go on from there to show you something sad and funny that seems horribly familiar. Thank God she had a good editor, though. I've stopped reading her blog because she uses SAT words (usually not in the normal way...I need her to explain why she uses "render" so much and so weirdly) and a mishmash of stream-of-consciousness and snark. But the weird style was reined in for the full-length book, and I enjoyed her voice. I can't imagine getting married as young as she did, but the message of finding someone who loves you and your style because it's YOURS, not because it's fashionable, is a delight.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Gerstein

    I wish I could give this book 3.5 stars - it's not a 3 nor is it a 4, it's clearly a 3.5. Honestly, I wanted to not like this book, because I'm always jealous of 20-something Millennial babes who have more going on than I do. But that was hard - Medine writes in an engaging everywoman style (ok if everywoman is a native NYer - I'm biased) that makes it easy to relate to her. She really throws it out there. Everything, nothing held back, and that's impressive bravado for someone so young. If you'r I wish I could give this book 3.5 stars - it's not a 3 nor is it a 4, it's clearly a 3.5. Honestly, I wanted to not like this book, because I'm always jealous of 20-something Millennial babes who have more going on than I do. But that was hard - Medine writes in an engaging everywoman style (ok if everywoman is a native NYer - I'm biased) that makes it easy to relate to her. She really throws it out there. Everything, nothing held back, and that's impressive bravado for someone so young. If you're the type of person who thinks an item of clothing has a fascinating backstory, this is the book for you. Plus, it's a quick read, another reason why it's not a 3.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fashion+Serendipity

    As early as I can remember I found solace in books and music. Many days of my awkward teen years, one might argue those years have yet to end, were spent locked up in my shared bedroom with my nose in a book and the music blaring to drown out my companions noise. You see as the eldest of seven children solace was actually quite rare. Fast forward to many many years later and I sit atop my bed where I have spent the whole day accompanied by tea or coffee (don't judge I am nursing a week long cold As early as I can remember I found solace in books and music. Many days of my awkward teen years, one might argue those years have yet to end, were spent locked up in my shared bedroom with my nose in a book and the music blaring to drown out my companions noise. You see as the eldest of seven children solace was actually quite rare. Fast forward to many many years later and I sit atop my bed where I have spent the whole day accompanied by tea or coffee (don't judge I am nursing a week long cold) inhaling Leandra Medine's aka The Man Repeller's account of her journey thus far in Man Repeller: Seeking Love, Finding Overalls. In her book Medine is honest, raw and quite witty. Not only does she let us into many an embarrassing moment of her life but she also conveys the feeling of "hey we are alright in our eccentric and unique way". Ultimately, there is no greater inspiration than the camaraderie discovered in reading someone's true story and recognizing slivers of one's own nuisances and hopes. Upon its release for sale I encourage many a mother, sister, and friend to purchase for those cool and special women in your life: trust me on this one! -FashSerendipity

  10. 5 out of 5

    PurpleTeapot

    This book mostly felt very unedited and sporadic. Some of the anecdotes were amusing or interesting I suppose, but nothing connected or flowed together. It was never clear what the timeline of everything was, as her writing jumped around so much and the tense changed. Many girls everywhere can relate to the heartache and anxiety of finding love/ not finding love/ being heartbroken but I wish she’d been able to tie it all together- the stories all feel like a bunch of loose threads. But the worst This book mostly felt very unedited and sporadic. Some of the anecdotes were amusing or interesting I suppose, but nothing connected or flowed together. It was never clear what the timeline of everything was, as her writing jumped around so much and the tense changed. Many girls everywhere can relate to the heartache and anxiety of finding love/ not finding love/ being heartbroken but I wish she’d been able to tie it all together- the stories all feel like a bunch of loose threads. But the worst part of this memoir is how painfully uncomfortable it is to observe her naïveté. As we repeatedly observe her New York- centered universe and nonissue with spending incredible amounts of money on clothes, nice apartments, going to restaurants regularly, living lavishly in Paris, going on exotic vacations, AND feeling comfortable asking relatives to spend copious amounts of money on clothes, it makes the average reader very uncomfortable and makes Leandra less relatable unfortunately.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    I love Medine's style and I follow her man repeller instagram account because it's heavy NYC and funky fashion pics, which I love. But wow, this book is so shallow. Also, she sort of brushes over the fact that she had an eating disorder and made herself ridiculously thin, but then doesn't actually admit that. And it's clear that she is really really thin now and I just wish the book was a bit more honest about that and other things. It just felt like a chat with a really scattered friend who tel I love Medine's style and I follow her man repeller instagram account because it's heavy NYC and funky fashion pics, which I love. But wow, this book is so shallow. Also, she sort of brushes over the fact that she had an eating disorder and made herself ridiculously thin, but then doesn't actually admit that. And it's clear that she is really really thin now and I just wish the book was a bit more honest about that and other things. It just felt like a chat with a really scattered friend who tells you random stories that have no link to eachother.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Beckett

    Void of unique sass.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gwendolyn

    Disappointing. I love the Man Repeller blog/website and was hoping to find the same clever, self-deprecating essays on clothes, style and modern life I enjoy there in this book. Instead it is an autobiography, something which is simply coming too soon, from an under 25-year-old. You have to have had a bit more life before it's interesting to other people. It mostly contains a rather dull love story, where she meets her great love very young, in her late teens, breaks up with him for no understan Disappointing. I love the Man Repeller blog/website and was hoping to find the same clever, self-deprecating essays on clothes, style and modern life I enjoy there in this book. Instead it is an autobiography, something which is simply coming too soon, from an under 25-year-old. You have to have had a bit more life before it's interesting to other people. It mostly contains a rather dull love story, where she meets her great love very young, in her late teens, breaks up with him for no understandable reason, pines for him for 3 years, somehow gets him back and marries him. Good for her, but a decidely dull read. It does have its funny moments, but I would have preferred to read much less about her private life and much more about her fashion choices. I maintain it's not her fault she's born into an upper east side family, but a rags-to-riches story would at least have been interesting. Instead we get a pampered girl who moves from her mother's care straight into the safe haven of marriage, with a few descriptions of clothes and the story of how she started her blog on the side. Nope, sorry. Stick to blogging.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    Loved, loved, loved this! I've always enjoyed everything Leandra has ever had to say. Man Repeller is one of few fashion blogs I follow constantly. I love everything about the woman, I genuinely think she is fantastic and I can't get enough of her groovy outfits (and lack of everyday makeup!) This was really well composed, each chapter focusing on a wardrobe item and how it related to significant moments in her life. She is incredibly hilarious and whilst reading, it feels like you're chatting wit Loved, loved, loved this! I've always enjoyed everything Leandra has ever had to say. Man Repeller is one of few fashion blogs I follow constantly. I love everything about the woman, I genuinely think she is fantastic and I can't get enough of her groovy outfits (and lack of everyday makeup!) This was really well composed, each chapter focusing on a wardrobe item and how it related to significant moments in her life. She is incredibly hilarious and whilst reading, it feels like you're chatting with a friend. I don't read non-fiction very often. It has to be about someone I find a genuine interest in and there is no doubt that after reading this I'll read everything Leandra will ever publish. Thumbs up for spewing in Hermès clutches and tripping Manolos through dog poo, here are five stars from me!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Satchwell

    5-stars, but would only recommend to a very select few of my friends. Like Leandra, I grew up "in-between" the ever-present "artistic-career" lifestyle and conservative-Religious lifestyle. Instead of exchanging one for the other once I hit that "coming of age" time of life, I enthusiastically said BOTH, PLEASE! (with a shit-eating grin, much to everyone's confusion, with diction ripe to make someone equally puke/cry-inspired.) This book gave me the much-wanted meat between finding Leandra's "Ma 5-stars, but would only recommend to a very select few of my friends. Like Leandra, I grew up "in-between" the ever-present "artistic-career" lifestyle and conservative-Religious lifestyle. Instead of exchanging one for the other once I hit that "coming of age" time of life, I enthusiastically said BOTH, PLEASE! (with a shit-eating grin, much to everyone's confusion, with diction ripe to make someone equally puke/cry-inspired.) This book gave me the much-wanted meat between finding Leandra's "Man-Repeller" blog in late 2010, saying 'OMG, that's me'... and STILL actively reading it since then, and dealing with my own complex life full of big decisions.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Brown

    I've been a casual reader of ManRepeller over the past few years, and I'm going to have to upgrade that adjective to 'avid'. Leandra entertains you through every chapter and conjures up such vivid imagery when simply describing a pair of shoes. Her witty, self-deprecating humor makes her surprisingly relatable, because lord knows I can't relate to her closet and lifestyle. So yes, while she grew up New York affluent, you can't fault her for that. Leandra wins your over with her ultimate message: I've been a casual reader of ManRepeller over the past few years, and I'm going to have to upgrade that adjective to 'avid'. Leandra entertains you through every chapter and conjures up such vivid imagery when simply describing a pair of shoes. Her witty, self-deprecating humor makes her surprisingly relatable, because lord knows I can't relate to her closet and lifestyle. So yes, while she grew up New York affluent, you can't fault her for that. Leandra wins your over with her ultimate message: cultivate your own style and be unabashedly yourself. Overalls and all.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan Taylor

    I love Leandra Medine and Man Repeller, having been a daily reader for at least 7 years now. However, I think it's unfortunate that Leandra wrote this book when she was so young because it's so.... out of touch? Unrelatable? Tone deaf? Having grown up super privileged, it's hard to relate these short essays with the insightful, funny and brilliant woman I know Leandra as now. I hope she writes another memoir one day. I love Leandra Medine and Man Repeller, having been a daily reader for at least 7 years now. However, I think it's unfortunate that Leandra wrote this book when she was so young because it's so.... out of touch? Unrelatable? Tone deaf? Having grown up super privileged, it's hard to relate these short essays with the insightful, funny and brilliant woman I know Leandra as now. I hope she writes another memoir one day.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Mitchell

    Remind me never to read a book by a blogger or basically anyone Twitter famous again. All of the fun, quippy things MR says in her blog become totally contrived after 50 pages. Also-- poor life choices, shitty role modeling, etc. YUK.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rain

    I really need to stop reading memoirs by people young enough to be my children.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eliza

    I love Leandra's blog, Man Repeller, and I love her unusual take on fashion and trends. I think her voice has grown exponentially since she wrote this book, and so (being late to the game and reading this 2013 memoir in 2019) I was surprised by how young and entitled she seemed. She is funny, and heartfelt in places, and the book was an enjoyable read. But some things didn't add up - in one passage, she talks about her mother being shocked she asked about Dolce & Gabbana, and in another, she's a I love Leandra's blog, Man Repeller, and I love her unusual take on fashion and trends. I think her voice has grown exponentially since she wrote this book, and so (being late to the game and reading this 2013 memoir in 2019) I was surprised by how young and entitled she seemed. She is funny, and heartfelt in places, and the book was an enjoyable read. But some things didn't add up - in one passage, she talks about her mother being shocked she asked about Dolce & Gabbana, and in another, she's a teenager in Chanel flats. There's a funny anecdote about a grandmother's knock-off heirloom, but then the same grandmother buys her a luxury handbag. There's also lots of talk of muffin tops and love handles and scoffing at girls who don't eat, but Leandra herself is emaciated in every photo (and by her own admission, it's not natural; there's a whole chapter on her crash-dieting to lose baby fat and impress her older brother). All in all, it feels like the memoir of someone smart, funny, and rich, who's on the cusp of self-awareness but hasn't quite grasped it. There's little-to-no self-reflection amidst lavish teenage parties, luxury brands bought before Leandra was old enough to drink, and internships scored with little effort. I'd be much more interested in a memoir written now, with the growth and awareness that time brings.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Georgina Wilmer

    I read this my last year of university because a friend recommended it, and I was going through a phase of reading a lot of 'coming of age' sort of books. Ultimately Leandra writes about her own personal experiences - and how she has tried to stay true to herself and her style growing up. One image particularly sticks out in that she wanted to wear a party dress all the time as a young girl and of course the overalls as mentioned in the sub-title. It battles with perception and anxiety over what I read this my last year of university because a friend recommended it, and I was going through a phase of reading a lot of 'coming of age' sort of books. Ultimately Leandra writes about her own personal experiences - and how she has tried to stay true to herself and her style growing up. One image particularly sticks out in that she wanted to wear a party dress all the time as a young girl and of course the overalls as mentioned in the sub-title. It battles with perception and anxiety over what people think of you - and whilst I'm sure she may not have fully intended this; it made me (at the time) scrutinise my life and choices that I was making for other people rather than myself, and that became really powerful for me as I was coming to the end of university. I still think about this book now when I pick out outfits to wear!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kissy

    Not sure what to make of Medine; she's obnoxious but interesting. Maybe she's interesting *because* she's obnoxious? Her raw openness and will to totally humiliate herself for a laugh appeal to me and I do think she has interesting opinions on fashion. I wouldn't necessarily take her advice on love or life but then again, she published these essays when she was in her early to mid-twenties – and from her later writing and Instagram, I know that she has matured out of most of the strange opinions Not sure what to make of Medine; she's obnoxious but interesting. Maybe she's interesting *because* she's obnoxious? Her raw openness and will to totally humiliate herself for a laugh appeal to me and I do think she has interesting opinions on fashion. I wouldn't necessarily take her advice on love or life but then again, she published these essays when she was in her early to mid-twenties – and from her later writing and Instagram, I know that she has matured out of most of the strange opinions she voices here. Her fashion sense has also greatly matured, which is interesting to observe... overall, an enjoyable read. Clever enough but not too deep. TRIGGER WARNING: one chapter is about anorexia even though the author claims she didn't have anorexia. (Reader: she had anorexia. She starved herself until she lost her period, so...yeah. Textbook.)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Izzy

    Is it a perfect book? No. Have some parts aged poorly? You bet. But it kept me engaged and entertained enough that I went to bed smiling every night after having read it. The chapter on Paris with the ostrich Hermes clutch is a hoot (and having a twist ending in a memoir is delightfully unexpected). Ditto the chapters on harem pants and “gory details”. I like who Leandra sees herself as. Though her mission for MR comes off as a bit contrived, everything else about her personality is so “I don’t t Is it a perfect book? No. Have some parts aged poorly? You bet. But it kept me engaged and entertained enough that I went to bed smiling every night after having read it. The chapter on Paris with the ostrich Hermes clutch is a hoot (and having a twist ending in a memoir is delightfully unexpected). Ditto the chapters on harem pants and “gory details”. I like who Leandra sees herself as. Though her mission for MR comes off as a bit contrived, everything else about her personality is so “I don’t take myself seriously” that you just can’t help but laugh along with her.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Ball

    I enjoyed reading this book but it wasn't what I expected. I was hoping to read about how Leandra started Man Repeller and how she grew the business but instead read about her fashion mishaps and successes. I did enjoy her sense of humour but at times her narrative was a tad confusing. I loved how she broke down the chapters by articles of clothing. She pieced together stories related to one top or one pair of pants. It was unique and engaging. I enjoyed reading this book but it wasn't what I expected. I was hoping to read about how Leandra started Man Repeller and how she grew the business but instead read about her fashion mishaps and successes. I did enjoy her sense of humour but at times her narrative was a tad confusing. I loved how she broke down the chapters by articles of clothing. She pieced together stories related to one top or one pair of pants. It was unique and engaging.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Han

    Leandra Medine's 'memoir' was a mindless and often times gruelling read about a privileged woman's love for fashion and her quest to find love, as the title suggests. In an attempt to be funny, Medine does not manage to find much depth in most of the topics she writes about, with the exception of her Jewish background and briefly her fight with her brother which brought about (view spoiler)[an eating disorder (hide spoiler)] . Even these heavy topics were not given the time or writing prowess to Leandra Medine's 'memoir' was a mindless and often times gruelling read about a privileged woman's love for fashion and her quest to find love, as the title suggests. In an attempt to be funny, Medine does not manage to find much depth in most of the topics she writes about, with the exception of her Jewish background and briefly her fight with her brother which brought about (view spoiler)[an eating disorder (hide spoiler)] . Even these heavy topics were not given the time or writing prowess to make it memorable, which is an ironic shame because her ambitions to become a writer in her late-teens early-2os were in a way successful in that she got a job at a fashion magazine and was able to capitalise on her eponymous blog 'Man Repeller', but in the end did not help her become a better writer. Nuance is missed even in the biggest topic: fashion. Instead of writing about the deep impact and connection she had with fashion and clothes, Medine repeatedly provided us with ridiculous episodes of retail therapy, spontaneous purchases and unaffordable purchases. Even when she wrote about how the clothes made her feel, it seems to be overshadowed by a silly writer voice. I do commend her on being honest about her vulnerabilities throughout life and even acknowledging and analysing the controversy surrounding her (view spoiler)[wedding (hide spoiler)] Overall, a very unpleasant read, a wasted 2 weeks of uncommitted reading. I can imagine some people liking it for the humour (I didn't find her funny) and vicariously living through a privileged and rich young woman.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Camila

    I don’t particularly remember how I found the Man Repeller Blog but I do remember I was fascinated by the articles and the concept. Last year I found out she had a book and I had to read it! Now that I did all I can say is the same I can say about the blog, funny, witty but all I all it has a bit of seriousness to it. P.S: if only I could be as sure of myself as Leandra!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Robinson

    Leandra is my best girl who can do no wrong, with this exception that I wanted to love so much. Unfortunately her token self-deprecation rang hollow, giving some of her humor a meaner edge, and overall it didn’t seem representative of the person we got to know via the blog. I wonder if she reads this like I read old journals, embarrassed and very fond of my naive young self.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Knapp

    I think Leandra could be my spirit animal. So many laugh out loud moments. Man Repelling is at its heart, the freedom to be who we are and express that through the art of dressing however we want. Also I would love to meet her parents, I think they definitely deserve a special mention. Now where are my MC Hammer pants...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Imogen

    As an avid follower of Leandra and Man Repeller, it's been really interesting to look back and delve into her world at age 25. Perhaps less pithy and a little more self-indulgent than her current incarnation, but a thoroughly enjoyable and pace-y read nonetheless. As an avid follower of Leandra and Man Repeller, it's been really interesting to look back and delve into her world at age 25. Perhaps less pithy and a little more self-indulgent than her current incarnation, but a thoroughly enjoyable and pace-y read nonetheless.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    Love this, love her!

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