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Indivisible: Poems for Social Justice

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"Anthology including over 50 works of poetry by 20th century writers on issues related to social justice in American society." "Anthology including over 50 works of poetry by 20th century writers on issues related to social justice in American society."


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"Anthology including over 50 works of poetry by 20th century writers on issues related to social justice in American society." "Anthology including over 50 works of poetry by 20th century writers on issues related to social justice in American society."

30 review for Indivisible: Poems for Social Justice

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cecily

    Today is Wendell Berry's 84th birthday, and a friend circulated a poem from this anthology: Enemies by Wendell Berry (1994) If you are not to become a monster, you must care what they think. If you care what they think, how will you not hate them, and so become a monster of the opposite kind? From where then is love to come—love for your enemy that is the way of liberty? From forgiveness. Forgiven, they go free of you, and you of them; they are to you as sunlight on a green branch. You must not think of them Today is Wendell Berry's 84th birthday, and a friend circulated a poem from this anthology: Enemies by Wendell Berry (1994) If you are not to become a monster, you must care what they think. If you care what they think, how will you not hate them, and so become a monster of the opposite kind? From where then is love to come—love for your enemy that is the way of liberty? From forgiveness. Forgiven, they go free of you, and you of them; they are to you as sunlight on a green branch. You must not think of them again, except as monsters like yourself, pitiable because unforgiving. So far, the only Berry I've read is the beautiful novel, Jayber Crow (which I reviewed HERE). That has a strong undercurrent of fair play and honour, but it's not explicit. This poem is a whole new angle of his work, and pertinent in troubled times, when hatred is increasingly visible, and "social justice" often used as a term of abuse.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    “With all thy wide geographies, manifold, different, distant, Rounding by thee in One---one common orbic language, One common indivisible destiny and Union.” -Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass This anthology of 54 poems is more about personhood from the point of view of America’s many rich diverse populations---which does not make the poems less good, or the collection less satisfying as a whole. It feels more conservative than what I was expecting---less of a “clarion call” of overt, badass voices u “With all thy wide geographies, manifold, different, distant, Rounding by thee in One---one common orbic language, One common indivisible destiny and Union.” -Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass This anthology of 54 poems is more about personhood from the point of view of America’s many rich diverse populations---which does not make the poems less good, or the collection less satisfying as a whole. It feels more conservative than what I was expecting---less of a “clarion call” of overt, badass voices unmasking social injustices and imagining visions of radical change. These poems could introduce the topic of social justice to young people in a low-and-slow-burning way. While published in 2013, Indivisible’s poems are supposedly from and of the 20th century. I kept wanting to turn the pages and read more poems of the late 20th century by poets such as June Jordan, Jessica Hagedorn, Victor Hernandez Cruz, Pedro Pietri, and Jayne Cortez---among others. Some of my favorites included in Indivisible: “Perhaps the World Ends Here” by Joy Harjo, “The Last Word” by Amina Baraka, “A Ritual to Read to Each Other” by William Stafford, “Sure You Can Ask Me A Personal Question” by Diane Burns, “Picasso” by Ellyn Maybe, “Mexico is Sinking” by Guillermo Gomez-Pena, and “Prayer” by Louis Untermeyer.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    This is a wonderful collection of poetry from writers of vast backgrounds. It would serve as a great introduction to anyone looking to branch out into reading poetry and/or about topics of social justice. The poems have been carefully curated to cover a broad cross section of topics - from race, gender, immigration, assimilation , and more. I really can't recommend it enough. Even if you don't believe you're a "poetry person," this collection may prove you wrong. From Tupac to Langston Hughes to This is a wonderful collection of poetry from writers of vast backgrounds. It would serve as a great introduction to anyone looking to branch out into reading poetry and/or about topics of social justice. The poems have been carefully curated to cover a broad cross section of topics - from race, gender, immigration, assimilation , and more. I really can't recommend it enough. Even if you don't believe you're a "poetry person," this collection may prove you wrong. From Tupac to Langston Hughes to Dorothy Parker to Assotto Saint, including a foreword written by Common, it's extremely accessible poetry and one that should find a home on everyone's bookshelves. required disclaimer: I received an e-galley for free in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    I enjoyed the collection, but like with any collection, there were some that spoke to me more than others. Liberty Needs Glasses by Tupac, Misery by Langston Hughes, Perhaps the World Ends Here by Joy Harjo, and Other People's Lives by Alice Mishkin were some of my favorites. I enjoyed the collection, but like with any collection, there were some that spoke to me more than others. Liberty Needs Glasses by Tupac, Misery by Langston Hughes, Perhaps the World Ends Here by Joy Harjo, and Other People's Lives by Alice Mishkin were some of my favorites.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Riley

    This book was amazing!!! I have said before that I am not a fan of poetry, but that perspective has changed! I may not be a fan of certain types of poetry, but when it was in this type of concept, I LOVED IT! I have to admit, I didn't understand the meaning of some of the poems at first, but when I read the poems a second time, I immediately got it. Some of the meanings behind this book really stood out to me. It made me think about certain topics in another perspective. I highly recommend this This book was amazing!!! I have said before that I am not a fan of poetry, but that perspective has changed! I may not be a fan of certain types of poetry, but when it was in this type of concept, I LOVED IT! I have to admit, I didn't understand the meaning of some of the poems at first, but when I read the poems a second time, I immediately got it. Some of the meanings behind this book really stood out to me. It made me think about certain topics in another perspective. I highly recommend this book!!! :)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    The diversity of America is well represented in this anthology. Each poem drew me into a separate existence, and evoked a personal response. The poem that called my name and caused me to be still is: Prayer by Louis Untermeyer.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    "America is not easy." Those are the words the editors use to open their introduction to this stunning, brilliantly crafted collection of poetry. The poems in this anthology grapple with the failed promise of the American democratic project and what that has meant for various communities. A wonderful mix of writers from Tupac Shakur to Toi Derricotte, Assotto Saint, and Pat Mora are featured. The writers boldly critique ableism, sexism, racism, queer antagonism, class-based discrimination, and o "America is not easy." Those are the words the editors use to open their introduction to this stunning, brilliantly crafted collection of poetry. The poems in this anthology grapple with the failed promise of the American democratic project and what that has meant for various communities. A wonderful mix of writers from Tupac Shakur to Toi Derricotte, Assotto Saint, and Pat Mora are featured. The writers boldly critique ableism, sexism, racism, queer antagonism, class-based discrimination, and other forms of marginalization and exclusion that have marked (and continued to mark) American political and social life. That this collection was assembled especially for children in middle school and high school is very important. To be honest, I see no reason why elementary school children should be excluded from the target audience; we know that children not only comprehend but also reproduce behaviors that perpetuate inequality at an early age. All too often primary and secondary education curricula approach American history and literature with reverence and limitless praise. There is very little recognition of the glaring contradictions that marked the nation's founding and shaped its present. There is very little of the erasure and marginalization that has disenfranchised some communities for centuries. As such, we need collections like these. They are deeply instructive for people of all ages, but especially necessary for young minds. The earlier we work to decolonize education and encourage critical reflectiveness, the better. I strongly recommend this anthology. I received an e-galley of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tommy

    A breathtaking collection of poems that address social justice in America, touching on challenges faced by a tapestry of oppressed cultures in our nation. Many familiar names are here: Maya Angelou, Kenneth Rexroth, Wendell Berry, Mary Oliver, Amiri Baraka - but I was equally if not more so taken by the poets whose names were not familiar. The poems are chaptered by loose subject matter (We Are All Getting Burned, The Secrets We Give, The Next Thing To Happen, etc) that give some thematic contex A breathtaking collection of poems that address social justice in America, touching on challenges faced by a tapestry of oppressed cultures in our nation. Many familiar names are here: Maya Angelou, Kenneth Rexroth, Wendell Berry, Mary Oliver, Amiri Baraka - but I was equally if not more so taken by the poets whose names were not familiar. The poems are chaptered by loose subject matter (We Are All Getting Burned, The Secrets We Give, The Next Thing To Happen, etc) that give some thematic context, but truly, one could pick this book up, read any two or three random pages/poems and have some mighty fuel for the next leg of the journey. There are a lot of truths here - some ugly, some inspiring. All necessary for us to embrace if we are to progress as a people and a nation. It may be naive to believe that poetry will somehow provide a path out of the miasmatic tumult we find ourselves in, but I do believe it can shine a light, both on our feet and in our hearts. And that gives strength for the journey, both in our bones and in our souls.

  9. 4 out of 5

    S'hi

    Incredibly powerful and diverse poetry to make people think, feel and act differently. Even the biographical notes at the end of the book are inspiring for their diversity and commitment of so many to their writing despite the challenges of their lives. Much more than a textbook, although it has been focused for an audience of students and their teachers, these poems are a stirring reminder of the responsibility that goes hand-in-hand with the various Rights movements over the past century and m Incredibly powerful and diverse poetry to make people think, feel and act differently. Even the biographical notes at the end of the book are inspiring for their diversity and commitment of so many to their writing despite the challenges of their lives. Much more than a textbook, although it has been focused for an audience of students and their teachers, these poems are a stirring reminder of the responsibility that goes hand-in-hand with the various Rights movements over the past century and more.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kaydence Sanville

    If you are one of those who like poems and historical fiction , I would definitely recommend this book. It includes over 50 poems of work that were made during the time period in the 20th century due to issues that were related in social justice in the American society. I personally chose this book because I love historical backgrounds that actually happened in the past and I really enjoy reading poems that are written by famous authors.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Diana Gagliardi

    Such an amazing collection of words and thoughts. It is one that I would read over and over, hoping for a rainy day excuse to sit and bathe in it. I have put it on my wish list, my wish is for it to be on my shelf so that someday in the future my self that has forgotten will find it again And drink. Enjoy!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Nice collection of poems from mostly well known writers about big umbrella social justice issues: race, sexuality, poverty, immigration and more. As a librarian, I am troubled that the biographical information about the poets was "found online and not verified by authenticated sources nor attributed to original authors." For real? Low bar Norwood House Press. Nice collection of poems from mostly well known writers about big umbrella social justice issues: race, sexuality, poverty, immigration and more. As a librarian, I am troubled that the biographical information about the poets was "found online and not verified by authenticated sources nor attributed to original authors." For real? Low bar Norwood House Press.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    Indivisible: Poems for Social Justice by Gail Bush collection of historic and culturally diverse group of poems. showing the lives, not only of immigrants, but diverse groups that have been regulated to the sides of society. From native Americans, to blacks, to Jews, and all other who have been miss understood. A lot of political and public opinion can cause so much hurt.

  14. 4 out of 5

    kerry ♥️

    My favorites... Immigrants - Nancy Byrd Turner The Handicapped - Philip Dacey Man In Space - Billy Collins Indian Movie, New Jersey - Chitra Baner jee Divakaruni Sunrise - Mary Oliver A Ritual to Read to Each Other - William Stafford Prayer - Louis Untermeyer

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This started off SO strong, and I felt like it lost momentum at the end. But man, those first 50 or so pages really took my breath away. My personal favorite was "Man in Space" by Billy Collins. Chills. This started off SO strong, and I felt like it lost momentum at the end. But man, those first 50 or so pages really took my breath away. My personal favorite was "Man in Space" by Billy Collins. Chills.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    A well curated collection of poems that make you think. I read most of them more than once and could read them all over and learn more each time.

  17. 4 out of 5

    vanessa

    This was a lovely collection of poems that made me think. I especially enjoyed that they focused on a variety of experiences - I'm going to need to look into more anthologies like this. This was a lovely collection of poems that made me think. I especially enjoyed that they focused on a variety of experiences - I'm going to need to look into more anthologies like this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Child960801

    I pick this one up at the library and I really liked it. A wide selection of authors and poems about the experience of living and being an outsider in society. I recommend.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    A must read. Great anthology of poems. This contains over 50 poems. Written by many poets, including Maya Angelou, Jimmie Durham, and Langston Hughes. This anthology will have you thinking.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie Simmons

    When I think of Norwood House Press, I think about Dear Dragon or other books for preschool aged children. This is what was in my mind when I started reading this book. I soon realized that this was not the case. This book is geared more toward late middle school and high school, but I think that adults should read it too. This is an anthology of 50 or so poems based on social injustices in the United States. These injustices include discrimination based on color, sex, sexual orientation, ethnic When I think of Norwood House Press, I think about Dear Dragon or other books for preschool aged children. This is what was in my mind when I started reading this book. I soon realized that this was not the case. This book is geared more toward late middle school and high school, but I think that adults should read it too. This is an anthology of 50 or so poems based on social injustices in the United States. These injustices include discrimination based on color, sex, sexual orientation, ethnicity, as well as the struggle for equality and justice. In school, I struggled through all poetry sections in English classes, and I'm pretty sure I made a joke out of them. While reading this book, I loved the free form of most of the poems, which made it a bit easier to read. Some of them, I am still not sure what I was supposed to get out of them, but others made me look inside myself, to see what I could be doing better. Everyone could do better! Thank you Norwood House Press and NetGalley for the digital ARC of this book, which made this honest review possible.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Mar

    “Indivisible Proems for Social Justice” is a collection of poems related to social justice issues from the 20th century, appropriate for upper middle school. The poets are a delightful mixture of current and past, including individuals such as Tupac Shakur to Langston Hughes. The book’s poems progress through five phases: liberty was misquoted, we are all getting burned, giving secrets away, the signals we give and the next thing to happen. The aim is to start with a broad view of social justice “Indivisible Proems for Social Justice” is a collection of poems related to social justice issues from the 20th century, appropriate for upper middle school. The poets are a delightful mixture of current and past, including individuals such as Tupac Shakur to Langston Hughes. The book’s poems progress through five phases: liberty was misquoted, we are all getting burned, giving secrets away, the signals we give and the next thing to happen. The aim is to start with a broad view of social justice and hone it into a personal conviction for social change. Personally, I enjoyed that the poems were honest and thought prokoving to the reader. Additionally, the forms of each of the poems varied giving the reader a diverse and rich reading experience. It’s important to note that the topics discussed are indeed raw and powerful, perhaps not directly addressed in the classroom. However, using the medium of poems in the classroom, the book lends itself to being a great starter for meaningful discussions. Additionally, the poems can be dissected for deeper meaning and literary techniques. The topics covered are also broad but offer students insight into different social justice issues in America.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Gail Bush is a member of the selection committee for the Suburban Mosaic Book of the Year Program. http://www.suburbanmosaicbooks.org Suburban Mosaic’s purpose is to foster cultural understanding and promote social justice. Indivisible is an anthology of poems that illustrate the journey we, as humans, experience and the issues we deal with in American society. This anthology has been a work in progress for years, as permission was granted from each 20th century poet, before the poem could be in Gail Bush is a member of the selection committee for the Suburban Mosaic Book of the Year Program. http://www.suburbanmosaicbooks.org Suburban Mosaic’s purpose is to foster cultural understanding and promote social justice. Indivisible is an anthology of poems that illustrate the journey we, as humans, experience and the issues we deal with in American society. This anthology has been a work in progress for years, as permission was granted from each 20th century poet, before the poem could be included. The poems are divided into five categories. My personal favorite is “Perhaps the World Ends Here” by Joy Harjo. Metaphorically, the kitchen table is the place where the world begins and ends. The heart of a family’s life, joys, sorrows, and celebrations, often occur while we are gathered around the kitchen table.

  23. 4 out of 5

    S

    Some people love poetry. They like the rhythm, the flow of the words, the musicality of the art. If you love poetry, you don't need me to tell you to check it out. If you don't like poetry - if you've never really gotten it - try reading Indivisible: Poems for Social Justice. This book is for poetry lovers and haters alike. America is founded on big dreams and high ideals but the reality sometimes is stark and harsh. Take a journey through what it means to be American with this beautifully select Some people love poetry. They like the rhythm, the flow of the words, the musicality of the art. If you love poetry, you don't need me to tell you to check it out. If you don't like poetry - if you've never really gotten it - try reading Indivisible: Poems for Social Justice. This book is for poetry lovers and haters alike. America is founded on big dreams and high ideals but the reality sometimes is stark and harsh. Take a journey through what it means to be American with this beautifully selected compilation. Whether you're drawn to Wendell Berry's provocative "Enemies" or Tupac Shakur's "Liberty needs glasses", Indivisible will draw you into an America where conflict and resolution come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and races.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Toby

    Rather than 'a dead thing on a page', poetry can be a mirror, a window or a sliding glass door, inviting readers to experience the range of American diversity. Carefully selected for excellence, the poems collected in Indivisible shine the light on all forms of cultural injustice, but in the end, offer hope for the future. Here is Edwin Markham's poem Outwitted: He drew a circle that shut me out - / Heretic, a rebel, a thing to flout. / But Love and I had the wit to win: / We drew a circle that Rather than 'a dead thing on a page', poetry can be a mirror, a window or a sliding glass door, inviting readers to experience the range of American diversity. Carefully selected for excellence, the poems collected in Indivisible shine the light on all forms of cultural injustice, but in the end, offer hope for the future. Here is Edwin Markham's poem Outwitted: He drew a circle that shut me out - / Heretic, a rebel, a thing to flout. / But Love and I had the wit to win: / We drew a circle that took him in! Happy Poetry Month, everyone!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dina

    This book is a collection of poems dealing with all kinds of issues related to inequality and social injustice. There are poems about racism, sexism, etc. Though I am not a "poetry person", I do think that readers at high school level or above who like poetry would find this volume interesting and though-provoking, especially since it deals with sensitive issues in a bold manner. This book is a collection of poems dealing with all kinds of issues related to inequality and social injustice. There are poems about racism, sexism, etc. Though I am not a "poetry person", I do think that readers at high school level or above who like poetry would find this volume interesting and though-provoking, especially since it deals with sensitive issues in a bold manner.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lane

    This was a good collection of poems that could easily be a catalyst for several discussion points on social justice. I could not pick one that spoke to me the most. Several of the poems gave a new perspective of how to look at events that have occurred in history. I thought this collection was worth the read. I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Hawley

    I'm not really a poetry person, but I loved this book of poetry. It moved me to thought and emotion. It angered and inspired me. I am actually teaching it in my Introduction to Literature class (college), and many of my students have responded positively to it, stating that it has opened their eyes to the lives of others (the vast majority of my students are white, middle class). I'm not really a poetry person, but I loved this book of poetry. It moved me to thought and emotion. It angered and inspired me. I am actually teaching it in my Introduction to Literature class (college), and many of my students have responded positively to it, stating that it has opened their eyes to the lives of others (the vast majority of my students are white, middle class).

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary Beth

    I don't consider myself a poetry person, but much of this resonated with me. Some I didn't "get" at all. So there you have it. Do NOT skip the Biographical Notes: ". . . While undeniably fascinating, please note that these notes are certifiably uncertified." Ha! I don't consider myself a poetry person, but much of this resonated with me. Some I didn't "get" at all. So there you have it. Do NOT skip the Biographical Notes: ". . . While undeniably fascinating, please note that these notes are certifiably uncertified." Ha!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mayra

    From the Foreword: [these poems] "have something to teach us all regardless of our stage of life, where we might reside now or where we are headed". This is true, but this thin blue book packs so much more, especially for the people whose voices are represented. It is a must in any school library. From the Foreword: [these poems] "have something to teach us all regardless of our stage of life, where we might reside now or where we are headed". This is true, but this thin blue book packs so much more, especially for the people whose voices are represented. It is a must in any school library.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    Wy

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