website statistics Here Be Monsters - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Here Be Monsters

Availability: Ready to download

Fans of Carl Hiaasen, Lawrence Block, and John Sandford will enjoy Tyler Cunningham's adventure for the tight writing, clever (MacGyver-esque) approach to problem-solving, and the chance to explore the Adirondacks with this quirky and unique protagonist. "Here Be Monsters" is Jamie Sheffield's first novel. Tyler Cunningham is a detective like no other. He can mimic humanity Fans of Carl Hiaasen, Lawrence Block, and John Sandford will enjoy Tyler Cunningham's adventure for the tight writing, clever (MacGyver-esque) approach to problem-solving, and the chance to explore the Adirondacks with this quirky and unique protagonist. "Here Be Monsters" is Jamie Sheffield's first novel. Tyler Cunningham is a detective like no other. He can mimic humanity, but in most cases fails utterly to understand people, why they do the things they do, or act in the ways that they do. His saving grace is an insatiable hunger for knowledge that combines with an ability to make connections from a series of seemingly unrelated data-points that other people miss; this continually pulls him into other peoples' problems, where his focus and unique perceptual abilities allow him to solve puzzles that others cannot see in ways that nobody else could conceive. In the heart of the Adirondack Park, the Northeast's last great wilderness, Tyler Cunningham, a detective who struggles to understand the human condition, finds himself trapped and powerless in the face of shocking cruelty and violence when the closest thing Tyler has to a friend vanishes as a result of his actions. His unique talents strap readers in for an astonishing thrill-ride, keeping them balanced on a knife's edge of suspense, while Tyler struggles frantically to unlock the secrets to a violent conspiracy that he finds himself swept up in, as the book rushes headlong towards a shocking conclusion deep in the primitive wilderness.


Compare

Fans of Carl Hiaasen, Lawrence Block, and John Sandford will enjoy Tyler Cunningham's adventure for the tight writing, clever (MacGyver-esque) approach to problem-solving, and the chance to explore the Adirondacks with this quirky and unique protagonist. "Here Be Monsters" is Jamie Sheffield's first novel. Tyler Cunningham is a detective like no other. He can mimic humanity Fans of Carl Hiaasen, Lawrence Block, and John Sandford will enjoy Tyler Cunningham's adventure for the tight writing, clever (MacGyver-esque) approach to problem-solving, and the chance to explore the Adirondacks with this quirky and unique protagonist. "Here Be Monsters" is Jamie Sheffield's first novel. Tyler Cunningham is a detective like no other. He can mimic humanity, but in most cases fails utterly to understand people, why they do the things they do, or act in the ways that they do. His saving grace is an insatiable hunger for knowledge that combines with an ability to make connections from a series of seemingly unrelated data-points that other people miss; this continually pulls him into other peoples' problems, where his focus and unique perceptual abilities allow him to solve puzzles that others cannot see in ways that nobody else could conceive. In the heart of the Adirondack Park, the Northeast's last great wilderness, Tyler Cunningham, a detective who struggles to understand the human condition, finds himself trapped and powerless in the face of shocking cruelty and violence when the closest thing Tyler has to a friend vanishes as a result of his actions. His unique talents strap readers in for an astonishing thrill-ride, keeping them balanced on a knife's edge of suspense, while Tyler struggles frantically to unlock the secrets to a violent conspiracy that he finds himself swept up in, as the book rushes headlong towards a shocking conclusion deep in the primitive wilderness.

30 review for Here Be Monsters

  1. 5 out of 5

    Niamh225

    I really like the concept and the protagonist, but, at 24 pages in, find myself wishing Sheffield's editor had told him to ease up on the use of the forward slash (/). Leashes/leads - pick one! In places it's effective but it's seriously over-used. I'm really hoping he eases up as I want to immerse myself in this book and enjoy the story but his stylistic choice is seriously getting in the way. *update* Having finished this book I can honestly say I found it entertaining and interesting. The devic I really like the concept and the protagonist, but, at 24 pages in, find myself wishing Sheffield's editor had told him to ease up on the use of the forward slash (/). Leashes/leads - pick one! In places it's effective but it's seriously over-used. I'm really hoping he eases up as I want to immerse myself in this book and enjoy the story but his stylistic choice is seriously getting in the way. *update* Having finished this book I can honestly say I found it entertaining and interesting. The device that so frustrated me in the beginning was less frequent throughout the rest of the book. Tyler is an interesting protagonist and I liked that the book continued past the event that in other novels would be the culmination of events. I look forward to the next book featuring this character.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John

    Good should be rewarded, or at the very least, embraced. Bad, however, must be destroyed. And if doing so sometimes means tip-toeing along the outer boundaries of the law, or in some cases, racking up a series of felonies, so be it. This pretty much sums up the uncomplicated moral philosophy of Tyler Cunningham, the protagonist created by Jamie Sheffield in his debut novel, Here Be Monsters. While Tyler’s philosophy may be uncomplicated, he most certainly is not. It’s a delight to follow this gi Good should be rewarded, or at the very least, embraced. Bad, however, must be destroyed. And if doing so sometimes means tip-toeing along the outer boundaries of the law, or in some cases, racking up a series of felonies, so be it. This pretty much sums up the uncomplicated moral philosophy of Tyler Cunningham, the protagonist created by Jamie Sheffield in his debut novel, Here Be Monsters. While Tyler’s philosophy may be uncomplicated, he most certainly is not. It’s a delight to follow this gifted and child-like character through New York State’s Adirondack Park as he rights perceived wrongs all the while loading up on carbs and swilling Coke. The Park, in all its beauty and quirkiness, plays a role as important as Tyler himself. Readers living inside the blue line are sure to recognize many familiar landmarks, while those on the outside may shake their heads and wonder if such a place truly exists in the 21st century. This is a fun, entertaining read, and I hope Tyler continues to follow his inner map setting the world right in many more adventures.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ray Palen

    If you were to ask most people what they think of when they hear the word – New York – what they will immediately call to mind is NYC and its’ many landmarks. Regrettably, these people are doing themselves a disservice by not recognizing the beauty and mystery of New York State outside of Manhattan. One of the most beautiful, historical and mysterious parts of New York State is the Adirondack Mountains region that has been made most famous by the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics held in Lake Placid. If you were to ask most people what they think of when they hear the word – New York – what they will immediately call to mind is NYC and its’ many landmarks. Regrettably, these people are doing themselves a disservice by not recognizing the beauty and mystery of New York State outside of Manhattan. One of the most beautiful, historical and mysterious parts of New York State is the Adirondack Mountains region that has been made most famous by the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics held in Lake Placid. Who will ever forget the Gold Medal won by the U.S. Olympic Hockey squad over arch-rival Russia!? This area has also spawned many literary works from Theodore Dreiser’s AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY (made into the classic film “A Place In the Sun” featuring Montgomery Clift); to tales of the Lady In the Lake murder in Lake Placid, and, most recently the mystery series written by Julia Spencer-Fleming who lives in nearby Plattsburgh in Northern New York. Debut author Jamie Sheffield now presents his own entry into the sub-genre that can be entitled Adirondack fiction with his release of HERE BE MONSTERS. This novel is the result of thirty years of research and personal experience that Sheffield was able to fit into this first effort in the Tyler Cunningham Adirondack Mystery series. The term ‘here be monsters’ refers to the language often found on old maps when map-makers and sea travelers could not describe unchartered territory and relegated the unknown region that possibly houses monsters and mysteries yet to be seen by man. Tyler Cunningham is a highly unique protagonist and has a personal obsession with maps which the title of this novel draws obvious reference from. To put it succinctly, Tyler is technically homeless with no one he can really call a friend. He has issues with social interaction and prefers to live off the land in the manner of a survivalist. He likes to do research and help people out. Legally, he is not a private investigator, but that does not stop him from getting involved in situations where his particular expertise and knowledge of the Adirondacks terrain is needed. HERE BE MONSTERS opens with Tyler rescuing a young Amish girl from some bad guys and safely returning her to her family. This is only the beginning for Tyler Cunningham. A much larger problem --- and the one that drives the plot of this novel --- is when Cynthia Windmere (the closest thing to a girlfriend Tyler has ever had) --- goes missing. She works at the local library in Saranac Lake and also is a fan of research. Cynthia had mentioned to Tyler her desire to track down a local businessman named George Roebuck who she thinks is a major league drug dealer. Tyler also has similar suspicions and it turns out they were both right. George is a drug kingpin, specializing in meth (Breaking Bad anyone?) and his network spans well beyond the Adirondack Park. When Tyler attempts to confront George on his own and demand Cynthia’s safe return he underestimates the crime lord and is nearly killed in the process. He also learns that Roebuck’s goons claim to have dumped Cynthia in the nearby lake. For once in his life, Tyler Cunningham may truly have bitten off more than he can chew and it will take every ounce of his creativity and vast knowledge of the surrounding area to get his revenge on the bad guys. Like Arnold Schwarzenegger in “Predator”, Tyler must use his knowledge of the terrain and become one with it in order to battle evil. Tyler Cunningham is one of the more unique protagonists you will ever meet. He is clearly damaged goods having lost both of his parents in the 9/11 tragedy and now forced to deal with the loss of Cynthia. His inner monologue is covered on every page and makes up for the lack of dialogue that results from Tyler being a true lone wolf. He is also a fan of classic crime noir --- Spenser, Parker, Travis --- and HERE BE MONSTERS is a clever homage to that great genre. A fine debut and I eagerly await what comes next for Mr. Cunningham. Reviewed by Ray Palen for New Mystery Reader

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I wanted to give this 4 ½ stars but Goodreads doesn’t allow that level of exactitude. The only reason I docked it half a point from a perfect 5 was that you have to be patient with Tyler Cunningham. By his own words he’s socially retarded (in the descriptive term not the offensive meaning of the word) who even admits early on that his nigh obsessive compulsive attention to detail is something that people don’t need or want – including perhaps the reader. I initially had to resist the urge to ski I wanted to give this 4 ½ stars but Goodreads doesn’t allow that level of exactitude. The only reason I docked it half a point from a perfect 5 was that you have to be patient with Tyler Cunningham. By his own words he’s socially retarded (in the descriptive term not the offensive meaning of the word) who even admits early on that his nigh obsessive compulsive attention to detail is something that people don’t need or want – including perhaps the reader. I initially had to resist the urge to skip ahead because I was getting as tired and irritated with Tyler as other characters in the book did. When I stopped to think about it though, I have a sneaky suspicion that was the whole point and that I was caught in the author’s subtle plan all along. Tyler is a character of incredible depth, eliciting the same reactions “normal” people commonly might have when they encounter socially awkward, compulsive, or “weird” individuals who just don’t fit in our neat little mental schemas. But when Tyler’s world is thrust into chaos, I was riveted and unable to put my Kindle down. Like Frodo Baggins, he’s the last person you expect to face monsters, and I had to know how it was going to turn out with this very unlikely hero. In short, be patient with Tyler as you follow him around drinking God knows how many Cokes along the way. In the end, it’s definitely worth the story he will tell you.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I have read many of the same authors as the protagonist of this book, and I think he has done them proud. (Block, Sandford, Child...he doesn't mention him, but I think of C.J Box...) I enjoyed turning every page. There are clever plot turns mixed in with true gems in turns of phrase. There's darkness, underbelly, dosed with coke (the soda) and social awkwardness, and kindness, in just the right proportions. Sheffield has a real way with language. This will my go to gift for the next year - for anyo I have read many of the same authors as the protagonist of this book, and I think he has done them proud. (Block, Sandford, Child...he doesn't mention him, but I think of C.J Box...) I enjoyed turning every page. There are clever plot turns mixed in with true gems in turns of phrase. There's darkness, underbelly, dosed with coke (the soda) and social awkwardness, and kindness, in just the right proportions. Sheffield has a real way with language. This will my go to gift for the next year - for anyone who doesn't discover it on their own. This is a find. Yay to the reader!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Sofferman

    This self-published first novel by Jamie Sheffield is a treat for anyone who loves the Adirondacks. This is the first time I've read a book written by a good friend, and it was a very interesting experience to see so much of the author's experiences come into the characters and the story! Although the book does a great job of describing many of the places in the Adirondacks that I experience on a daily basis, the true treasure is the focus on the many quirky characters that live among us here wi This self-published first novel by Jamie Sheffield is a treat for anyone who loves the Adirondacks. This is the first time I've read a book written by a good friend, and it was a very interesting experience to see so much of the author's experiences come into the characters and the story! Although the book does a great job of describing many of the places in the Adirondacks that I experience on a daily basis, the true treasure is the focus on the many quirky characters that live among us here within the blue line. I always say that I came to the Adirondacks for the scenery but stayed for the people - Sheffield highlights this sentiment masterfully. I always enjoy reading novels written by authors that are head over heels in love with their location, and that sense of place is prominent in Here Be Monsters. Tyler Cunningham, the book's protagonist, is a quirky character in and of himself. Socially distant, addicted to coca-cola, and more comfortable with dogs than people, he fancies himself an undercover detective and sometime vigilante. When his closest friend (a research librarian at the local public library) goes missing, he is determined to not only discover what happened to her, but to also avenge any wrongdoing. (An aside: it bothered me that Sheffield has his librarian character exhibit extremely uncharacteristic behavior by spying on her library patrons, since normally librarians are champions of patron privacy, but he and I have already had words about that!) My favorite part of mystery titles is usually the "mystery," where the characters and the reader analyze clues and try to find out what happened; I would have liked to see that part fleshed out a bit more in this book, but I believe the author preferred to focus on the action scenes. It was interesting how the pace of the book reflected the action - the intense scenes moved very quickly and the reflective camping scenes much more slowly. An effective plot device. Some readers may be bothered by the very casual writing style of the author, including excessive use of parentheses and slashes (and a few typos), but these writing mannerisms were included intentionally as a means of providing the reader with insight into Tyler's unusual mind and understanding his sometimes interesting choices. I enjoyed this book, especially the sections where Tyler describes his experiences with walking and choosing dogs from the animal shelter, and camping in the Adirondack woods (frequent peeing descriptions notwithstanding). The book is as much a crime drama as a mystery, and several scenes were fairly intense. The violence and some swearing put this title into the YA and above reading level. Sheffield is an entertaining writer, with many fun asides that at times made me laugh out loud. I look forward to reading more Tyler Cunningham mysteries!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    What an amazing book! Jamie Sheffield's main character Tyler Cunningham is unlike any person I've ever read about before. Shy, introverted, possibly a bit autistic, missing the emotional firmware that most humans come with that help them understand the behavior of people around them but intelligent, a reader and researcher who seeks to expand his personal map of the world around him. I identified with his suppressing his attention to detail when dealing with others. I like the (personal comments What an amazing book! Jamie Sheffield's main character Tyler Cunningham is unlike any person I've ever read about before. Shy, introverted, possibly a bit autistic, missing the emotional firmware that most humans come with that help them understand the behavior of people around them but intelligent, a reader and researcher who seeks to expand his personal map of the world around him. I identified with his suppressing his attention to detail when dealing with others. I like the (personal comments and asides) scattered through his thoughts and dialog. Tyler is a lover of the outdoors (camping, hiking, and fishing) and what a setting to put him in: Adirondack Park and the wilderness surrounding the Lower, Middle, and Upper Saranac Lakes. It made me want to live there and expand my personal map. Tyler is a lover of dogs, especially ones that find themselves in the Tri-Lakes Animal Shelter through no fault of their own. It did seem like the main climax of the book (the "boss battle") happened about two-thirds of the way through the book; this kept feeling early to me (subjective). I kept expecting one of the henchmen to climb back out of the mine and renew the conflict. His "Grandma's" recipe for tiramisu is included at the back of the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Zartman

    I almost put down this book several times. The chunky writing style, the frequent italicized comments in parenthesis, and being stuck in someone's head that I couldn't relate to all combined to make it difficult to get into the book. I pushed through my confusion because I am a rather new author myself, so I wanted to give the book a fair shot. I'm glad I kept going. Tyler Cunningham certainly makes the most unique "detective" in my reading history. I disagree with his moral choices, but as I ca I almost put down this book several times. The chunky writing style, the frequent italicized comments in parenthesis, and being stuck in someone's head that I couldn't relate to all combined to make it difficult to get into the book. I pushed through my confusion because I am a rather new author myself, so I wanted to give the book a fair shot. I'm glad I kept going. Tyler Cunningham certainly makes the most unique "detective" in my reading history. I disagree with his moral choices, but as I came to understand his character I found it increasingly difficult to put the book down. The layout of the story follows its own course, like the thought life of the main character, with the mystery solved early in the book, and the height of tension coming just before the halfway point. It pulls you on, nevertheless, and takes you on a journey with a different look at life. I hope to see more of this author's work.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Jamie Sheffield has written a wondrous novel. It is on of the more interesting, unusual books I've read in many years. We retired and moved to the Adirondacks about 7 years ago and I look for books with this setting. I read the reviews of this novel and was undecided if my husband would like it or not but when I ran across the title again a few weeks later, I ordered it. My husband was soon mentioning places in the Saranac Lake area that we had visited this past summer. He enjoyed the book for b Jamie Sheffield has written a wondrous novel. It is on of the more interesting, unusual books I've read in many years. We retired and moved to the Adirondacks about 7 years ago and I look for books with this setting. I read the reviews of this novel and was undecided if my husband would like it or not but when I ran across the title again a few weeks later, I ordered it. My husband was soon mentioning places in the Saranac Lake area that we had visited this past summer. He enjoyed the book for both its uniqueness and settings. I picked it up not expecting to do more than skim it as the reviews hadn't inspired me to read it. I was almost immediately engrossed in the book. The author nailed the main character whom one expects has a form of Asperger's. Tyler shines with authenticity. I am awed by this novel and am anxious to share it with friends. I hope we will soon be gifted with another novel by Mr. Sheffield with further Adirondack adventures of Tyler Cunningham.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    Tyler Cunningham is not your typical, hard boiled private detective; he's mostly a loner all right, but (due perhaps to Asperger's?) relates to and interacts differently with the world than most of us. Even with his quirks he's still an immensely likable character; the author doesn't drown the reader in Tyler's quirks, just enough to explain the way he is. A great story full of interesting, believable characters, and the descriptions of the Adirondacks area where it takes place were beautiful. I Tyler Cunningham is not your typical, hard boiled private detective; he's mostly a loner all right, but (due perhaps to Asperger's?) relates to and interacts differently with the world than most of us. Even with his quirks he's still an immensely likable character; the author doesn't drown the reader in Tyler's quirks, just enough to explain the way he is. A great story full of interesting, believable characters, and the descriptions of the Adirondacks area where it takes place were beautiful. I can't wait for the next in the series; I hope there are a lot more to come! (P.S. Mr. Sheffield, do you know where I can get the cane-sugar Cokes that Tyler drinks? I'm a Coca-Colaholic too! :D)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    Wonderful book, pertaining to the setting of this story. I especially liked the main charater in this story and made me think of some very unique people I have known. Very good story that clearly held my interest.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amy Cronin

    Excellent story-telling in this first novel by Jamie Sheffield, who by day is a special ed teacher in Lake Placid. Captivating story and characters. And the fact that its setting is the region of the Adirondacks in which I grew up was an added bonus. I could place Tyler Cunningham's every move! Excellent story-telling in this first novel by Jamie Sheffield, who by day is a special ed teacher in Lake Placid. Captivating story and characters. And the fact that its setting is the region of the Adirondacks in which I grew up was an added bonus. I could place Tyler Cunningham's every move!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    More thriller than mystery If I weren't expecting a mystery, I'd likely have rated this higher. The voice is unusual but interesting. I felt like the story was reaching a natural conclusion around 80 percent but the rest worked and fit also, although it ends on a hook. Annoying. But biggest issue is that it isn't a mystery in the usual sense. More someone getting into trouble trying to help someone else then struggling to get out of it. More suspense of if he will make it, etc, than the puzzle I More thriller than mystery If I weren't expecting a mystery, I'd likely have rated this higher. The voice is unusual but interesting. I felt like the story was reaching a natural conclusion around 80 percent but the rest worked and fit also, although it ends on a hook. Annoying. But biggest issue is that it isn't a mystery in the usual sense. More someone getting into trouble trying to help someone else then struggling to get out of it. More suspense of if he will make it, etc, than the puzzle I expect from a mystery.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tisha

    A strong 4.5! HBM is the story of a socially awkward, neuro-different young man, Tyler, who has a flair for solving mysteries, if not for figuring out what is most obvious to the rest of us about human nature. The plot was strong, and if traditional, and the characters (especially the rescue animals!) were likable. The amount of time dedicated to the minutiae of Tyler's thoughts felt a bit over done, but overall a good book and looking forward to the next one in the series! A strong 4.5! HBM is the story of a socially awkward, neuro-different young man, Tyler, who has a flair for solving mysteries, if not for figuring out what is most obvious to the rest of us about human nature. The plot was strong, and if traditional, and the characters (especially the rescue animals!) were likable. The amount of time dedicated to the minutiae of Tyler's thoughts felt a bit over done, but overall a good book and looking forward to the next one in the series!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Switzer

    Great Book I really enjoyed this book. The main character, Tyler, is unique and interesting. The end of the book was fast paced. I could not put it down. I definitely recommend this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Robinson

    I didn’t finish it. This is probably the worst book I ever read. The writing is horrible. The story was vague. I can’t believe someone published such utter garbage and that I paid 13$ for it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Genna

    This was pretty good!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Allen

    "Here Be Monsters" is the debut novel of Jamie Sheffield, an author who resides in the Adirondack Park in upstate NY, and his intimate knowledge of that great wilderness rings through with loud & clear accuracy as well as an accute attention to detail when describing the local haunts & habitats. That accute attention to detail is also put to good use when describing Tyler Cunningham, the Coke-swigging, back-packing, hammock-camping, dog-loving, mystery-solving, law-bending (and sometimes breakin "Here Be Monsters" is the debut novel of Jamie Sheffield, an author who resides in the Adirondack Park in upstate NY, and his intimate knowledge of that great wilderness rings through with loud & clear accuracy as well as an accute attention to detail when describing the local haunts & habitats. That accute attention to detail is also put to good use when describing Tyler Cunningham, the Coke-swigging, back-packing, hammock-camping, dog-loving, mystery-solving, law-bending (and sometimes breaking) protagonist/hero. I'm not generally a fan of murder-mysteries, preferring the action/horror genres, but Sheffield reeled me in like a rainbow trout on a treble hook by making Tyler Cunningham one of the most unusual characters I have ever read. Tyler doesn't see the world as most people do; as he describes himself in the book, he is "socially retarded, in the descriptive, not the offensive, sense of the word." He is technically homeless (preferring to hammock-camp out in the woods), socially-inept (even when his "friend" disappears, Tyler only goes looking for her in order to restore balance to his life, not out of any sense of loyalty), has no interest in sex, has to practice how to smile...and the list of social "weirdness" continues. Sure, one can argue that Tyler is off-putting and hard to relate to...and I would argue back that Tyler's uniqueness is what makes him so interesting to read. Even with a couple minor distractions (such as Tyler's tendency to think in parenthetical asides and a climax that comes--no pun intended--too early), I found myself eagerly turning pages to see what this unusual outcast would do next, how he would put that brilliantly off-kilter mind of his to work to solve the problems he faced. Bottom line, any fan of soft-boiled detective fiction, any fan of the Adirondacks or the great outdoors in general, any fan of unique characters, or any fan of murder mysteries in general should check out this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lena

    "Here Be Monsters" is Jamie Sheffield's first novel set in the Adirondack Park of Northern NY. Jamie Sheffield is a great story teller, and he creates a world based in the beautiful place he calls home. The title of the novel may conjure up a story about a sasquatch type creature, or even man eating fresh water lake monsters. Instead, we are introduced to Tyler Cunningham, and a small group of unique characters that will stay with you long after finishing this book. Tyler is a bit of a social mi "Here Be Monsters" is Jamie Sheffield's first novel set in the Adirondack Park of Northern NY. Jamie Sheffield is a great story teller, and he creates a world based in the beautiful place he calls home. The title of the novel may conjure up a story about a sasquatch type creature, or even man eating fresh water lake monsters. Instead, we are introduced to Tyler Cunningham, and a small group of unique characters that will stay with you long after finishing this book. Tyler is a bit of a social misfit that enjoys sleeping in his hammock at random campsites in seclusion, is a big fan of ice cold Canadian Coca-Cola, GORP, jelly filled donuts and is also an unorthodox crime investigator. The story begins with Tyler playing rescuer to a girl involved in a shady situation and transporting her back to her family’s home. It makes the reader wonder, who is this guy? From there, you are drawn into Tyler’s strange life, quirky way of thinking, and the mysterious disappearance of a character that he considers to be one of his few friends. He begins to get in over his head as the plot builds, and turns to another memorable character for help; Dorothy, the local Animal Shelter manager. The social interactions between the main character add to the complexity of the main character as the reader gets pulled into this crime solving adventure. There are twists and turns along the way that will keep you guessing what Tyler will do or think of next. Once you start reading this book you won’t want to put it down. I’m so glad I grabbed a copy from the local Community Store in Saranac Lake. I am eagerly looking forward to the next Tyler Cunningham novel.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    So, I hate to be a downer but I'm somewhat convinced that all of the 4 and 5 star ratings are by friends of the author. To call this a mystery (as proclaimed in the sub-title "A Tyler Cunningham Adirondack Mystery) is a mockery to the genre. There is no mystery here since we find out what happened to Cynthia the librarian and novel's victim within the first few chapters. There is no whodunit and no build up of clues leading the reader to unravel any actual mystery. The story then becomes nothing So, I hate to be a downer but I'm somewhat convinced that all of the 4 and 5 star ratings are by friends of the author. To call this a mystery (as proclaimed in the sub-title "A Tyler Cunningham Adirondack Mystery) is a mockery to the genre. There is no mystery here since we find out what happened to Cynthia the librarian and novel's victim within the first few chapters. There is no whodunit and no build up of clues leading the reader to unravel any actual mystery. The story then becomes nothing but a tale of a forest-dwelling MacGyver type who spends 10 days tracking the "bad guys" (as he so descriptively refers to the drug dealing killers). After he manages to deal with Cynthia's perps halfway through the book, we are left with about 100 pages of his boring pursuit of drug camps throughout the north country backwoods. It was impossible to care about Cynthia or what happened to her since we never actually met her and knew nothing about her except Tyler's brief description. For that matter, none of the characters were particularly likable or developed in any way. Finally, the description on the back of the book indicates there will be a "shocking conclusion deep in the primitive wilderness." Seriously? I'm not saying the final scenes are something I'd want to partake in, but I'd hardly call anything about the ending a "shocking conclusion." Having Frank be the real puppeteer behind the meth labs...now that would've been shocking!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    This is a page turning fun read that is part nature writing and part mystery. Tyler Cunningham is unlike any other detective. He lives in the woods of the Adirondack Park and runs a business called Smart Pig, a "thneedery" that optimizes the 'Jack of All Trades' spirit of people who live in the the Park. He is challenged by an almost sociopathic lack of understanding of the human condition which allows us, the reader, to view the world through his lens as he problem solves his way into more and This is a page turning fun read that is part nature writing and part mystery. Tyler Cunningham is unlike any other detective. He lives in the woods of the Adirondack Park and runs a business called Smart Pig, a "thneedery" that optimizes the 'Jack of All Trades' spirit of people who live in the the Park. He is challenged by an almost sociopathic lack of understanding of the human condition which allows us, the reader, to view the world through his lens as he problem solves his way into more and more danger. Camping enthusiasts will love the descriptions of some great backwoods locations, the rest of us will just love it!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Fischler

    My favorite Tyler story After reading all of the Tyler stories (twice now), this one tops my list. It's the type of book you can so easily relate to that you find yourself pausing to daydream. As someone who lives in the Adirondacks, I often find myself daydreaming about what Tyler would do as I pass landmarks particular to this story. A fun, easy, suspenseful read. Kuddos! My favorite Tyler story After reading all of the Tyler stories (twice now), this one tops my list. It's the type of book you can so easily relate to that you find yourself pausing to daydream. As someone who lives in the Adirondacks, I often find myself daydreaming about what Tyler would do as I pass landmarks particular to this story. A fun, easy, suspenseful read. Kuddos!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This took me far too long to read, owing to the fact that I moved in the middle of reading it, BUT it was quite a fun adventure and I enjoyed the ride it took me on. Always fun to read about my home town and the surrounding areas!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leanne Frazee

    Local mentions good book. free borrow from Amazon. Will look for others. gave me some ideas for camping and places to check out in the Adirondacks. he did a nice job describing the feeling of the woods.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jon Cunningham

    Good but not great! Good but not great! For a first novel, I think that Mr. Sheffield did a good job. The book definitely held my attention and I enjoyed the author's unique style. I felt that there were some holes in the plot but overall, I liked the book. Good but not great! Good but not great! For a first novel, I think that Mr. Sheffield did a good job. The book definitely held my attention and I enjoyed the author's unique style. I felt that there were some holes in the plot but overall, I liked the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    JoHannah Reardon

    I really enjoyed the quirkiness of the main character and thought the storyline was compelling. It kept me reading until the end. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is that it could use a good edit - I found quite a few mistakes. But I liked it enough to read another Tyler Cunningham story! I really enjoyed the quirkiness of the main character and thought the storyline was compelling. It kept me reading until the end. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is that it could use a good edit - I found quite a few mistakes. But I liked it enough to read another Tyler Cunningham story!

  27. 5 out of 5

    James R. Stenhouse spark

    Enjoyed Tyler was devastated by the terrible, sudden loss of his parents. He loved them, he shut his emotions down, isolated himself, used his gift, skirted the law and was awkward with friendships. Loving. Friendships. At the ending, opening up.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Goodwin

    I am fascinated with Tyler and love reading about places in the Adirondacks that I am so familiar with! I read the first two books and am reading "The Weaving" now. More please! I am fascinated with Tyler and love reading about places in the Adirondacks that I am so familiar with! I read the first two books and am reading "The Weaving" now. More please!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Enjoyable! If you love the Adirondacks, you'll appreciate this read. Enjoyable! If you love the Adirondacks, you'll appreciate this read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Potsdam Public Library

    Quite good. Particularly interesting because the setting is totally familiar.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.